Do you use colour meter's ?

Started Apr 28, 2008 | Discussions
peterjohn36 Regular Member • Posts: 462
Do you use colour meter's ?

Just thought out of interest how many use this meter to get the kelvin correct, rather than using the card. I am not including PP on this thread as we all know the answer to PP.

Pete

Lighthog Contributing Member • Posts: 572
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

I am experimenting with a '70 Gossen Sixticolor. It seems to be closer than AWB. The current digital Gossen is over $1300. I notice the Sixticolor on e-Bay for about $50.

Lighthog

OP peterjohn36 Regular Member • Posts: 462
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

Lighthog wrote:

I am experimenting with a '70 Gossen Sixticolor. It seems to be
closer than AWB. The current digital Gossen is over $1300. I notice
the Sixticolor on e-Bay for about $50.

Lighthog

Hi have also noticed a sixticolor in the uk, might be worth going for, to play around with.

Pete

Lighthog Contributing Member • Posts: 572
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

The Gossen Sixticolor is German made. Very high quality plastic body. The meter is very simple with a dial to set film types and calculate the color correction and color compensation filter needed. In digital age, it reads out color temperature in K, which can then be set to the D300 directly. BTW, the meter does not need battery.

Full sun with white cloud (not blocking the sun) reads 5400K
Full sun with clear blue skies reads 7000K
Overcast reads 7000 to 9000K
5000K curly flu bulbs reads 5200K
3500 curly flu bulbs reads 3200K
2700 curly flu bulbs reads 2500K

I also have a similar age Gossen LunaPro lightmeter. In 35 years, I never have to change the battery (No need for Deoxit when it is built right : )

Lighthog

OP peterjohn36 Regular Member • Posts: 462
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

Lighthog wrote:

The Gossen Sixticolor is German made. Very high quality plastic body.
The meter is very simple with a dial to set film types and calculate
the color correction and color compensation filter needed. In digital
age, it reads out color temperature in K, which can then be set to
the D300 directly. BTW, the meter does not need battery.

Full sun with white cloud (not blocking the sun) reads 5400K
Full sun with clear blue skies reads 7000K
Overcast reads 7000 to 9000K
5000K curly flu bulbs reads 5200K
3500 curly flu bulbs reads 3200K
2700 curly flu bulbs reads 2500K

I also have a similar age Gossen LunaPro lightmeter. In 35 years, I
never have to change the battery (No need for Deoxit when it is built
right : )

Lighthog

Thanks for the information, am going to go for one will be interesting in the end results.

Pete

Lighthog Contributing Member • Posts: 572
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

Peter,

When you use it, hold down the switch for a long time (like 10 secs for mine) in particular in low light. Hope you like it.

Lighthog

(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 14,338
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

peterjohn36 wrote:

Just thought out of interest how many use this meter to get the
kelvin correct, rather than using the card. I am not including PP on
this thread as we all know the answer to PP.

I think it's probably not a good idea.

If you look at most RAW converters, you'll see there are TWO sliders associated with white balance. A color temp (more correctly, correlated color temp) and a tint.

Most standalone meters only measure the temp and not the tint. The one's that measure both are very expensive and require frequent calibration.

So unless you're willing to a small fortune on these instruments, you're much better off taking advantage on the WB features that Nikon built into your camera and maybe a grey card or Expodisk when you really need to get it right.

OP peterjohn36 Regular Member • Posts: 462
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

malch wrote:

peterjohn36 wrote:

Just thought out of interest how many use this meter to get the
kelvin correct, rather than using the card. I am not including PP on
this thread as we all know the answer to PP.

I think it's probably not a good idea.

If you look at most RAW converters, you'll see there are TWO sliders
associated with white balance. A color temp (more correctly,
correlated color temp) and a tint.

Most standalone meters only measure the temp and not the tint. The
one's that measure both are very expensive and require frequent
calibration.

So unless you're willing to a small fortune on these instruments,
you're much better off taking advantage on the WB features that Nikon
built into your camera and maybe a grey card or Expodisk when you
really need to get it right.

Many thanks for your reply, you have given me food for thought, I have always shot in raw, just thought I would try Jpegs when going on holiday, I also have lightroom so can change the WB with in it on Jpegs, think I might keep to the same formatt.

Pete

(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 14,338
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

peterjohn36 wrote:

Many thanks for your reply, you have given me food for thought, I
have always shot in raw, just thought I would try Jpegs when going on
holiday,

I considered that too. What I have done (and have been very happy about) is to shoot RAW take an old laptop with me and left in the hotel room or whatever. At the end of the day I can copy all of the images to the hard drive; even burn a DVD.

Now, this laptop is really ancient and underpowered. Capture NX? No way. Ditto for CS3 et al. But it will run IrfanView, and fast. I can view the images, extract or make JPEGs, do simple edits, mail them and more. I've even had prints made while we were travelling. And when I get home, I have a full set of RAW images and all of the processing options that implies.

This strategy has worked well for me and I think it's delivered the best of all worlds. And it works with cheap/ancient/underpowered laptops too!

Lighthog Contributing Member • Posts: 572
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

I only shoot JPEG. What do you think of Expodisc?

Lighthog

Flashlight Veteran Member • Posts: 8,544
Correct

I have one of these expensive meters and the only time I use it is to match the color of my strobes with the color of available light. When I want to set the WB in a non-mixed situation I use a Tempo paper handkerchief over the lens while pointed at the light source and take a Custom WB.

I use the Tempo brand for several years, always a packet on me, and measure them occasionally with my color temperature meter. They have always been (almost) copletely neutral. Probably the same is true for most other brands.

malch wrote:

peterjohn36 wrote:

Just thought out of interest how many use this meter to get the
kelvin correct, rather than using the card. I am not including PP on
this thread as we all know the answer to PP.

I think it's probably not a good idea.

If you look at most RAW converters, you'll see there are TWO sliders
associated with white balance. A color temp (more correctly,
correlated color temp) and a tint.

Most standalone meters only measure the temp and not the tint. The
one's that measure both are very expensive and require frequent
calibration.

So unless you're willing to a small fortune on these instruments,
you're much better off taking advantage on the WB features that Nikon
built into your camera and maybe a grey card or Expodisk when you
really need to get it right.

-- hide signature --

Philip

love_them_all Senior Member • Posts: 2,794
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

Not a believer of expodisc or CBL. Too expensive and you could still get the WB off a lil. Just buy a grey card or a light grey card board. Some are only $2-3 each. Try several different shades until you see one you like the most.

Lighthog wrote:

I only shoot JPEG. What do you think of Expodisc?

Lighthog

-- hide signature --

geo200 Regular Member • Posts: 327
Re: Do you use colour meter's ?

I would get a color meter if they weren't soooo expensive.

(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 14,338
Re: Correct

Flashlight wrote:

I have one of these expensive meters and the only time I use it is to
match the color of my strobes with the color of available light. When
I want to set the WB in a non-mixed situation I use a Tempo paper
handkerchief over the lens while pointed at the light source and take
a Custom WB.

I keep a 3M microfiber cloth in my camera bag and have been using that to shoot a PRE. Since I don't have one of those expensive meters, I have never actually measured it. But this thread prompted me to take some shots of the WhiBal card placed on top of the cleaning cloth. An examination of those shots in Photoshop shows the cloth to be darn close to 18% grey. For all practical purposes, it really is a perfect 18% grey card.

For anyone interested, these cloths are a bit larger than most lens cleaning cloths (12 by 14 inches) and the 3M part number is 9027. They're widely available in retail stores for just a few bucks -- much cheaper than a WhiBal.

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