Spectraview Calibration Target

Started Jan 3, 2008 | Discussions
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Paul R NJ Regular Member • Posts: 284
Spectraview Calibration Target

I got an NEC 2490 a couple of weeks ago.

I just received the Spectraview software yesterday, and calibrated the monitor for the first time.

I set the intensity to 120 cd/m2, which brought the brightness of the monitor way down.

I picked the 'Monitor Standard' calibration target, because I figured that was closest to the type of work that I do.

When the monitor was calibrated, the software set the white point to 9300k and the gamma to 2.2. The gamma seems right, but the white point temp seems rather high - the screen seems to have a very blue tint to it.

Does this seem correct to you, or did I do something wrong here?

Thanks,

Paul
--
http://www.PaulRosenbaumPhotography.com

Robert Strom Senior Member • Posts: 2,982
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

If you are really serious about correct calibration, go ahead and spring for a hardware puck.

I got the Monaco Optix xr Pro for my NEC monitor and it really did the job and made a distinct difference in what I thought was a good calibration using only the Adobe Gamma program.

There is much debate on the best brand of puck. But, I think any of them are better than not having one.

MTW, Rob
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Paul R NJ OP Regular Member • Posts: 284
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

Sorry, I wasn't clear in my question - yes, I did use a hardware puck - I used the Spyder 2.

Actually, I currently have 2 different pucks - a Spyder 2 and a Monaco Optix. I have not yet decided which one I want to use long term here, but the initial calibration was done with the Spyder 2 puck.

Thx,

Paul
--
http://www.PaulRosenbaumPhotography.com

Tamlin_WSGF Forum Member • Posts: 83
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

9300K is way too high. Most people don't use above 6500K (standard daylight). White point is to reflect how white looks in the ambient lightning you use. If you need spesific temperature, you adjust lightning in the room according to your calibration settings. Since you use 120cd/m2, I recon you don't have a full office brightness in your enviroment. Try with 6500K and turn up lightning if it becomes too blue. Don't use direct light that hits the screen, but rather let it bounce off from walls. Having a lamp behind screen facing the wall could be a good option. For print, many uses a lower color temperatur, but they also turn down light in the room to compensate. As for tint in white, 5000K (yellow), 6500K (red) and 9300K (blue). If correctly calibrated to the ambient lightning in your room ,white looks ... white.

Paul R NJ OP Regular Member • Posts: 284
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

Tamlin_WSGF wrote:

9300K is way too high. Most people don't use above 6500K (standard
daylight). White point is to reflect how white looks in the ambient
lightning you use. If you need spesific temperature, you adjust
lightning in the room according to your calibration settings. Since
you use 120cd/m2, I recon you don't have a full office brightness in
your enviroment. Try with 6500K and turn up lightning if it becomes
too blue. Don't use direct light that hits the screen, but rather let
it bounce off from walls. Having a lamp behind screen facing the wall
could be a good option. For print, many uses a lower color
temperatur, but they also turn down light in the room to compensate.
As for tint in white, 5000K (yellow), 6500K (red) and 9300K (blue).
If correctly calibrated to the ambient lightning in your room ,white
looks ... white.

Yes, that is what I thought - on my old CRT, I had it calibrated to 6500K.

What isn't clear to me is the fact that the software seems to have defaulted to the 9300K temperature, which seems very strange to me. I get the feeling that I may not have my default settings on the software setup correctly, which caused me to default to 9300K. If that is wrong, then I wonder what else is wrong too??

I'm not at the monitor now, but when I get home tonight then I will try manually setting the temperature to 6500k, and see what happens.

Thanks,

Paul
--
http://www.PaulRosenbaumPhotography.com

Tamlin_WSGF Forum Member • Posts: 83
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

On Spectraview profiler (EU version of spectraview), there is a toggle of LCD/CRT. Perhaps its the same on Spectraview 2? That would explain it then why it defaults to 9300K. LCD's defaults usually to 6500K.

Paul R NJ OP Regular Member • Posts: 284
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

Tamlin_WSGF wrote:

On Spectraview profiler (EU version of spectraview), there is a
toggle of LCD/CRT. Perhaps its the same on Spectraview 2? That would
explain it then why it defaults to 9300K. LCD's defaults usually to
6500K.

I believe that the US version of the software (SV2) only supports LCD monitors (so there is no toggle), but I will check when I get home.

Thx,

Paul

Mitrajoon Senior Member • Posts: 1,725
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

There are several threads that discuss calibration settings for Spectraview. Main thing in your case is that you can edit any of the settings. So pick anyone, input the cdm you want (I use 110) and the White Point (I use D65). Other settings I use include: maximize contrast ratio, average low light measurements, 52 steps, and factory measurement. Not saying theses are correct, just what I use. As someone already mentioned, the lighting conditons in your computer room will have an impact. You can then rename the setting (e.g. My Monitor) or just leave as is, e.g., Monitor Standard or whatever.

Also you can uncheck automatically save profile. I do this so that after the icc profile is created I can rename it to include specific settings and date, then save that. I originally did this when I was experimenting with different settings. Now I just write over the existing profile unless I change something.

Don't forget to make sure your OS is using the profile you created as the default. This is another good reason to rename your new icc profile. Should happen automatically, but your OS might defer to the generic NEC profile (assumes you've installed the NEC install program for your monitor).

Good luck.
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Paul R NJ OP Regular Member • Posts: 284
Thanks! - Very helpful information (nt)
SamMurray New Member • Posts: 10
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

I calibrated my 2490 for the first time this morning, using the SVII software that NEC sent me. Like you, I also opted for the standard monitor setting, and was given a similar target of 9300K. I haven't changed any of the other targets. If I change the WP target to 6500K, all else equal, will I then have a correctly calibrated monitor? (Same Gamma, 2.2, etc.) Thanks for any help, totally overwhelmed by all this.
-Sam.

Paul R NJ OP Regular Member • Posts: 284
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

Hi Sam,

Same problem that I had -

Under the target settings line on the SV2 window, click on the first square icon on the left "Edit the Target Settings"

At the White Point drop down box, select D65. Set the brightness level as appropriate for you (I settled on 150 cd/m2, but your correct brightness will depend upon the ambient lighting). Set the Gamma Curve Value at 2.2, if it is not already there. Leave everything else as default.

Click 'OK', and then click Calibrate. Just follow the instructions on the screen. Everything should be fine from there on in - It really is very easy to use, once you get the default set right, and the colors are spot on.

Let me know if you need more clarification.

Paul
--
http://www.PaulRosenbaumPhotography.com

Ben_Egbert Forum Pro • Posts: 20,228
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

Just ordered Spectraview today, so I will need to refer to this post when it arrives and I install it on the puter that is also in shipping.

Paul R NJ wrote:

Hi Sam,

Same problem that I had -

Under the target settings line on the SV2 window, click on the first
square icon on the left "Edit the Target Settings"

At the White Point drop down box, select D65. Set the brightness
level as appropriate for you (I settled on 150 cd/m2, but your
correct brightness will depend upon the ambient lighting). Set the
Gamma Curve Value at 2.2, if it is not already there. Leave
everything else as default.

Click 'OK', and then click Calibrate. Just follow the instructions on
the screen. Everything should be fine from there on in - It really is
very easy to use, once you get the default set right, and the colors
are spot on.

Let me know if you need more clarification.

Paul
--
http://www.PaulRosenbaumPhotography.com

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SamMurray New Member • Posts: 10
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

Thanks so much Paul. Just curious, what's the difference between d65 and 6500k?
-Sam.

Paul R NJ OP Regular Member • Posts: 284
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

I know that the D65 maps to the CIE standard 6500K.

I can't tell you what the difference is between the 6500 and the D65, except to tell you that. Perhaps someone else can chime in with more information.

Paul
--
http://www.PaulRosenbaumPhotography.com

SamMurray New Member • Posts: 10
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

As far as intensity goes, I left mine on the default (maximum intensity), but can't figure out what the number is that correlates with this. When you changed yours to 130 was that to brighten or darken the screen? Thanks.
-Sam.

Mitrajoon Senior Member • Posts: 1,725
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

150 cdm seems high based on what others tend to use (I'm not an expert). Some of the folks who do this more for a living seem to choose a value between, 100 and 120. I picked 110 (remember, I just going on what the forum experts say). To answer someone else's question, the lower numbers make your screen darker. If your screen is too bright when you adjust your photos you will tend to get overly dark prints. One variable on this is the brightness or darkness of the room you are in when viewing and editing your photos. A higher cdm may be more appropriate if your room is very bright. Bottom line is if the prints you get match what you see on your screen and your happy with that, then you're OK.
--
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Ben_Egbert Forum Pro • Posts: 20,228
Some brightness values

I have used 110/CD/MM^3 in the past. I don't have Spectraview yet (on order). I use Monaco OprixXR and it sets the brightness as part of the calibration.

As I go through the process, it measures brightness and contrast and then has you set the screen to a target value depending on room darkness. I set mine to dim and need to go to 50% on the brightness control.

When the calibration is all done, I get a screen that says the brightness is around 186 CD/MM^3. Going by memory here, as I need to do a calibration to see this screen.

I have had it as high as 210CD/MM^3. which is too bright. I like it where it is currently set.

When I print to my Epson Pro3800, I need to lighten the image a bit for good results. The way I am doing this now is to add a levels layer and set the mid value to 1.10. This works pretty good.

Color matches are excellent between screen and printer.

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Ben_Egbert Forum Pro • Posts: 20,228
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

Just got Spectraview running on my new computer with the NEC2690. I have been using this monitor for several months on another computer and using Monaco to calibrate. It does look different.

The hardest part is choosing a brightness level. I started with 100CD/MM^3 and it seemed too light. I had been using 180 on my old computer. Then I tried the standard D65 and got around 300, way too bright. So I just did another at 150. I can see this will be a fine tuning deal.

Someday we ought to do a poll of Spectraview users on just that one setting. I have a fairly dim room, but the light is from 15W flourescent bulbs, the new energy saving types.

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Tamlin_WSGF Forum Member • Posts: 83
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

SamMurray wrote:

Thanks so much Paul. Just curious, what's the difference between d65
and 6500k?
-Sam.

D65 is always the same color regardless of context. Its a standard illuminant and the D stands for daylight. Its mapped on the daylight curve in the CIE chart.

6500K can be different colors or one spesific color depending on context. On the (Planckian) black body radiator curve on the CIE chart, 6500K is a spesific color. Its a spesific theoretical black body color temperature. As a correlated color temperature (CCT) in general, it can be many colors.

The planckian locus curve you see, represents spesific colors. In this context, 6500K is a spesific color on that line. The lines crossing the PL curve is the correlated color temperatures. 6500K can be any color mapped on that line when you speak of 6500K (CCT).

When you calibrate an LCD however, its a spesific color again with a set coordinate in the CIE chart:

D65 will target the color coordinates of CIE xy where x = 0.3127 and y = 0.3290

6506K will target the color coordinates of CIE xy where x = 0.3127 and y = 0.3290

6500K will target the color coordinates of CIE xy where x = 0.3128 and y = 0.3292

D65 and 6500 will be close when used as target with your calibrator.
D65 and 6506K will be the same target.

RJSPhotography Senior Member • Posts: 1,680
Re: Spectraview Calibration Target

my nec 2690 is set at 85cd/m2 and from memory at around 6200K - gives me great prints. Some of your monitor settings are too bright.

Cheers

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