D80 Overexposure

Started Dec 5, 2007 | Discussions
Steven Crow Regular Member • Posts: 128
D80 Overexposure

After searching for this subject, I have not found a solution for D80 overexposure. Has Nikon dealt with this, or does anyone have a solution?

Retailer in Dallas said he's never heard of this problem.

I had no similar problems with D70.

tinrobot Regular Member • Posts: 241
Re: D80 Overexposure

Exposure compensation -0.7 does the trick.

OP Steven Crow Regular Member • Posts: 128
Re: D80 Overexposure

Thanks......I will try that.

If not all of the shots are overexposed, will this be problematic with the shots that would have otherwise been OK?

Kim Letkeman
Kim Letkeman Forum Pro • Posts: 33,435
the issue is well understood ... read this ...

Thom Hogan discussed the issue in some depth in his review. You can always set -.7 compensation as the other poster suggested, but then you'll get some images that are really underexposed and noisy.

Better to learn what the camera is doing and compensate appropriately.

http://www.bythom.com/d80review.htm

Scroll down to exposure ...

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Tianium Veteran Member • Posts: 4,280
Re: Learn how it works for different scenes....

Learn how the camera exposes certain scenes. Then you will know when to dial in -ve exposure comp.

Take a test shot if you can first.

I believe the D80 is similar to the D40 exposure wise. Most scenes it meters very well. In contrasty scenes (consisting of bright sunlight and shadows) the cam tends to expose more for the shadows. Particulaly when the shadows are near the center of the pic ( or under the active AF sensor).

It's not faulty...Its just exposing for what it THINKS you are trying to take the picture of. Its clever but it can't read your mind

Canon seem to take the opposite approuch to Nikon. The Xti protects the highlights at all cost (they complain about underexposure over there). So you take a picture with someone sitting in the shade of the tree and the Nikon will expose for that person (the highlights will be blown but hey). The Canon will probably underexpose the scene trying to protect the highlights (so the sky will be good but the person is sitting in the dark). The trouble begins when the person sitting under the tree is not your subject...well it can't read your mind....

Cheers Darin

AlvinL Senior Member • Posts: 1,231
Re: Learn how it works for different scenes....

Yeah the D80 overexposes a lot. Seems like you have to check the histogram most of the time for critical shots. I have gotten used to it though but I still get some overexposed shots like this one:

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Tianium Veteran Member • Posts: 4,280
Re: Learn how it works for different scenes....

AlvinL wrote:

Yeah the D80 overexposes a lot. Seems like you have to check the
histogram most of the time for critical shots. I have gotten used to
it though but I still get some overexposed shots like this one:

Yeah thats a clasic isn't it....

The scene is backlit to a certain degree. What is right smack bang in the middle of the photo???? The shady side of the tree. Exposed for the shade.

Darin

Arrowman Senior Member • Posts: 1,727
Where's the problem?

It's interesting when people exhibit a high DR scene, with well exposed shadow areas and blown highlights (sky), as an example of "overexposure" or as though it illustrates some sort of problem with the camera.

Exactly what would you have called a "correct" exposure on that scene? A muddy foreground?

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Arrowman Senior Member • Posts: 1,727
You are being seriously misled and Dallas Retailer is right

Steven Crow wrote:

OK, I’ll apologise in advance - this post is a bit sarcastic and rude. I do not direct that sarcasm and rudeness at you personally, but at the attitudes and misinformation out there on the net that seem to have led you in the wrong direction. Please don’t take offence...

After searching for this subject, I have not found a solution for D80
overexposure.

Easy.

Learn about exposure and metering. Understand that no system, especially a matrix/average system, can read your mind or get every scene right under all conditions.

Understand that there is no such thing as “D80 overexposure”. There is such a thing as “the D80 meter behaves slightly differently from some other Nikon DSLRs in terms of the weight it gives to highlights etc)".

This in turn has led some people, for whom the D80 was the second camera they've ever used, to believe that (whatever camera they used before) was the one that gave "correct" exposure.

It also helps if you take the camera out of Auto/P mode now and then, and take some responsibility for exposure.

Has Nikon dealt with this, or does anyone have a
solution?

Retailer in Dallas said he's never heard of this problem.

That’s possibly because he’s never visited this forum. : ) I didn’t know there was a “problem” myself until I came here. Silly me, I spent all my time refining my skills instead of wondering whether the equipment was at fault.

I had no similar problems with D70.

No, apparently the D70 is different. I’m sure a D80 user would have to adjust to using a D70. Etc.

Steven Crow wrote:

Thanks......I will try that. [exposure comp -0.7]
If not all of the shots are overexposed, will this be problematic
with the shots that would have otherwise been OK?

Just think that one through for a minute.

What do you think?!?!

This “just dial in -0.7” is ridiculous. It would only work if the camera consistently overexposed every shot, under all conditions, to the same extent. It does not.

You use exposure compensation to suit the conditions, where your judgement (and test shots) tell you that this will produce the right result under the particular conditions.

Frankly anyone who thinks that “-0.7” is some sort of universal solution to a “problem with overexposure” is exposing just how little they understand cameras and metering.

If I had dialled in -0.7 from the day I started using my D80, about 80% of my shots would have been underexposed.

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Tianium Veteran Member • Posts: 4,280
Re: Where's the problem?

Arrowman wrote:

It's interesting when people exhibit a high DR scene, with well
exposed shadow areas and blown highlights (sky), as an example of
"overexposure" or as though it illustrates some sort of problem with
the camera.

Exactly what would you have called a "correct" exposure on that
scene? A muddy foreground?

I agree entirely... Thats my point. The camera has exposed for the shadows in the middle of the pic, under the active AF sensor.
What else should it expose for?

Darin

Yhbv24 Regular Member • Posts: 213
Re: D80 Overexposure

The best thing to do would be to buy a grey card (18%), which is what the meter "sets" itself as if it can't actually find it in the scene. So, if you are taking a scene with mostly bright green and blue (grass and sky, for example), it will assume either the sky or the grass is 18% grey, which is obviously not the case.

If you spot meter using the grey card as the subject, you can hold in that value (lock the meter) and then take the picture now that the camera has an appropriate item off of which to meter -- obviously, you remove the grey card from the scene once you have the meter set!

At least, I think that's how it works!

However, for daily use when I don't feel like using the card, I usually have to set the camera between 0 and -0.7 EV. It varies though.
--
http://web.mac.com/everash/

Chandrahadi Junarto
Chandrahadi Junarto Regular Member • Posts: 340
Re: D80 Overexposure

Agree with other poster, you just simply dial the EV to get desired lighting exposure, or Try to use spot meter in drastic light condition.
It will be more reliable in several condition
--
'See with your eyes - Shoot with your heart..'
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uncleskull Senior Member • Posts: 2,307
Re: D80 Overexposure

I don't have a problem.

If I don't like the settings the camera chooses, I simply dial in some compensation. One of us is always right.

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unc

~ The only things stopping us from reaching our goals are the limitations we place on ourselves ~

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genece Forum Pro • Posts: 15,438
please read Arrowman's answer

Because he is right on........the D80 does not overexpose or at least mine does not......and IMHO, dialing in a minus comp for all your shots would be a poor solution
--
Gene from Western Pa

http://imageevent.com/grc6
http://grc225.zenfolio.com/
FZ10....20 and 30 and FZ18

D50 ....D80 - 18 to 200VR- 50mm 1.8 - 80 to 400 OS

Just trying to learn and it's slow going!

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Taallyn Contributing Member • Posts: 712
Re: please read Arrowman's answer

Yeah. I've found that the worst part of my D80's meter is the fleshy bit behind the viewfinder. I'll have to upgrade that part of it someday.

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Craig
Nikon D80, 18-135mm, 50mm 1.8, SB600
Manfrotto 190XDB tripod
Kenko 12/20/36mm Ext. Tubes
http://taallyn.zenfolio.com

genece Forum Pro • Posts: 15,438
Re: please read Arrowman's answer

Craig....Maybe Nikon will release a firmware that will help us both

Taallyn wrote:

Yeah. I've found that the worst part of my D80's meter is the fleshy
bit behind the viewfinder. I'll have to upgrade that part of it
someday.

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Gene from Western Pa

http://imageevent.com/grc6
http://grc225.zenfolio.com/
FZ10....20 and 30 and FZ18

D50 ....D80 - 18 to 200VR- 50mm 1.8 - 80 to 400 OS

Just trying to learn and it's slow going!

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ30 Nikon D50 Nikon D7000 Nikon D7100
DezM
DezM Forum Pro • Posts: 34,987
I agree with Arrowman & Uncleskull

The D80's matrix metering exposes for dark areas. You need to learn about exposure. This guy Scott Kelby has an excellent book regarding exposure: http://www.scottkelby.com

What I do is expose for the bright areas in my frame and lock the exposure, than take the shot. You can post-process later and adjust the darker areas in your scene.

.....or you can use the compensation button and take several photos to match what you're looking at in the scene. As Arrowman said, there is no universal number of -0.07 to fix exposure.
--
Dez

http://www.dezmix.com/photography

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rafzyh Forum Member • Posts: 86
Re: D80 Overexposure

Change Martix metering to Central weighted.
I don't use Matrix on D80 at all.
Regards
Rafal
http://www.zych.republika.pl

Taallyn Contributing Member • Posts: 712
Re: please read Arrowman's answer

Gene, I think Nikon already did ... http://www.nikonschool.com/

genece wrote:
Craig....Maybe Nikon will release a firmware that will help us both

Taallyn wrote:

Yeah. I've found that the worst part of my D80's meter is the fleshy
bit behind the viewfinder. I'll have to upgrade that part of it
someday.

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Craig
Nikon D80, 18-135mm, 50mm 1.8, SB600
Manfrotto 190XDB tripod
Kenko 12/20/36mm Ext. Tubes
http://taallyn.zenfolio.com

hokieian New Member • Posts: 24
Re: please read Arrowman's answer

Also, when in doubt...bracket.

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