Isopropanol and ultrasound for cleaning Hoya filters?

Started Nov 22, 2007 | Discussions
Dom Regular Member • Posts: 451
Methanol is toxic

And don't forget that it will turn you blind- its a toxin that kills retinal cells. Wear nitrile gloves, don't breath the fumes. I'd suggest looking for something a little more pleasant if you're not used to handling toxic chemicals.

jpr2 Forum Pro • Posts: 15,554
Re: Methanol toxicity for the last time

DavidSvensson wrote:

I thought that it was the efficient methanol to formaldehyde
metabolism that caused an increased formaldehyde level in the blood,
which in turn damaged the nervous system. As long as the liver can
clean the bloodstream of the formaldehyde long-term effects of small
methanol exposure is very small?

On the other had, smoking used to be safe, and asbestos used to be
safe...

David, sorry if what I wrote sounded if i'm into pontification or worse :),

it is just that DPR is being used in all walks of life (and to my high astonishment
some consider it as an ultimate authority: "it was said on DPR, hence it must
be truth incarnated), esp. by kids. So, better be warned than sorry, thats all.

As to the harm, it is more formic acid than formaldehyde that destroys optic
nerve, and it is not reversible (yet). And you're perfectly right that given
(healthy) liver, the effects are being taken care of just by miracles of Nature.

However, when there are problems with one's liver (sometimes unknown
to their owners) the results might be tragic indeed. My friend used to work
as a physician in an urgent toxic response unit, and while usually the TD of
methanol is about as high as 4g/kg, they got a case where a "mere" 50 ml
was enough to cause total blindness (due to undiagnosed liver cirrhosis).

sorry for the bad news. And yes, isoprop. is also harmful but to much lesser
extent,

jpr2

erpguy Regular Member • Posts: 308
What's wrong with using a LensPen?

If they are safe and effective on the Lens itself, should be OK for the filter.. no?

OP DavidSvensson Senior Member • Posts: 1,374
Ultrasound + isopropanol does not fully remove fresh fingerprints

I just tested an ultrasound cleaner with a small quantity of 99.5% Isopropanol on an old uncoated filter.

I started by checking the cleanness of the filter, and then I deliberately added a fingerprint to the center of the filter.

Then I put it into the ultrasound.

After 90 s I pulled it out and inspected.

The side that was facing down, towards the ultrasound transducer was cleaner. The other side was not noticably better than before.

I flipped the filter over and commenced for another 90 s.

This time the side facing down got cleaner, but the fingerprint remained.

I then let it work for 5 minutes. No improvment. Fingerprint is still there. (I assume it is proteins in the fingerprint that remains, and that the fatty oils are dissolved into the Isopropanol.

I then cleaned the filter manually with a folded Pecpad and methanol, and the fngerprint is gone, and the filter is pretty clean.

Conclusions:

Pec-pads, Methanol and manual labor is faster, cheaper and better than ultrasound.

Forget anout ultrasound cleaning of filters. I t probably requires chemicals more nasty than isopropanol to work.

When the ultrasound is running there is a lot of vapour created, which would condense on the inside of the llid of the ultrasound cleaner. I kept a powder fire-extinguisher at hand, just in case.

David

Voyager13b Veteran Member • Posts: 3,392
Re: Ultrasound + isopropanol does not fully remove fresh fingerprints

Everyone seems to be going a bit overboard on the science of cleaning Hoya filters. Well, Ed might have it right. Most all of my filters are top grade Hoya filters, as I simply think that they are the best. Cleaning them is very easy. I use Zep brand commercial foaming glass cleaner (non ammonia), and a lint free cloth, or clean T shirt to remove prints, oil, and "stuff" from my filters after blowing off gritty contaminants. It takes about 20 seconds to clean a filter to factory new condition, and the same goes for all of my Canon lenses.

It's not a joke at all. I have been doing it for many years, and have never had any trouble. Since the cleaner is foam based, I also never have trouble with liquid seeping into the interior of a lens, or the frame of a filter.

Everyone can search for their own best solution, but the fact is that no form of alcohol is a solvent for everything that sticks to your glass, and neither is pure water, or even a combination of the two. There are far better methods available, but it is up to you to understand them, and to take responsibility for trying them. I am very happy with my method, even though it is not sanctioned by any lens manufacturer. They cannot test everything, so they pretend that glass never gets dirty.

My cleaner works like magic. If I can't get any more, I'll have to find something new, but I'm willing to do the homework needed to avoid the streak stories and cleaning woes that I read here....

-- hide signature --

Voyager

OP DavidSvensson Senior Member • Posts: 1,374
Zap brand foaming glass cleaner

Voyager13b wrote:

Everyone seems to be going a bit overboard on the science of cleaning
Hoya filters. Well, Ed might have it right. Most all of my filters
are top grade Hoya filters, as I simply think that they are the best.
Cleaning them is very easy. I use Zep brand commercial foaming glass
cleaner (non ammonia), and a lint free cloth, or clean T shirt to
remove prints, oil, and "stuff" from my filters after blowing off
gritty contaminants. It takes about 20 seconds to clean a filter to
factory new condition, and the same goes for all of my Canon lenses.

It's not a joke at all. I have been doing it for many years, and have
never had any trouble. Since the cleaner is foam based, I also never
have trouble with liquid seeping into the interior of a lens, or the
frame of a filter.

Everyone can search for their own best solution, but the fact is that
no form of alcohol is a solvent for everything that sticks to your
glass, and neither is pure water, or even a combination of the two.

That´s quite true.

There are far better methods available, but it is up to you to
understand them, and to take responsibility for trying them. I am
very happy with my method, even though it is not sanctioned by any
lens manufacturer. They cannot test everything, so they pretend that
glass never gets dirty.

Probably to avoid customer claims if ever a coating should be damaged from cleaning.

My cleaner works like magic. If I can't get any more, I'll have to
find something new, but I'm willing to do the homework needed to
avoid the streak stories and cleaning woes that I read here....

I don´t doubt your cleaning method works excellently, and I thought my Eclipse + Pecpads worked perfectly too, until I checked lens contrast under strong background light with my old Hoya Pro1 digital UV filter, a brand new Hoya filter and no filter at all, and found that a new Hoya filter was almost as good as no filter, but my seemingly clean old filter was in fact quite bad for contrast.

Did you do any "factory new" vs "cleaned with Zap" comparison in a manner sililar to that, please? (Or "cleaned with Zap" vs "no filter")

David

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