NEC 2690WUXi - can it handle regular sRGB?

Started Oct 1, 2007 | Discussions
Carl Robitaille New Member • Posts: 20
Re: NEC 2490WUXi rocks! sRGB looks great.

Tom_Bruno wrote:

Last week I took delivery of a NEC 2490WUXi.

Congrats on your purchase. Like you, I was going for a NEC 2690WUXi before reading this thread. So thank you very much for starting the thread and asking all the right questions, and of course thanks to everyone who contributed to this thread.

I now understand that the sRGB mode can't be calibrated and that the only way to use the 12 bits internal LUT is to use aRGB. Since I want to switch between Linux and XP, I want the colors to be accurate when using applications not color management aware. So the NEC 2690WUXi can't be a good option for me.

I read all the posts in this thread, and there is still one thing that isn't 100% clear for me. I think the NEC 2490WUXi makes possible the calibration in sRGB mode using the 12 bits internal LUT. Is it really the case??? It's not obvious from your last post, and I've read conflicting things about that. I just don't want that profile to be stored in the LUT on the graphics card.

In other words, if the standard sRGB profile is used in the by XP, does the calibration give good results? That would ensure that, when switching to Linux, the calibration would remain the same and the colors would be accurate for all applications.

What profile are you using right now in XP?

One last thing way to put it.... I want to calibrate the monitor, then connect it to a different computer and still have a calibrated monitor which is accurate for sRGB. Is it too much to ask?

Carl

Will49 Regular Member • Posts: 225
Re: NEC 2490WUXi rocks! sRGB looks great.

Carl Robitaille wrote:

I read all the posts in this thread, and there is still one thing
that isn't 100% clear for me. I think the NEC 2490WUXi makes possible
the calibration in sRGB mode using the 12 bits internal LUT. Is it
really the case??? It's not obvious from your last post, and I've
read conflicting things about that. I just don't want that profile
to be stored in the LUT on the graphics card.

The sRGB mode is not calibratable on either models (it's a factory preset). However since the 2490 is basically an sRGB gamut monitor, you can calibrate the monitor in it's Programmable mode to sRGB's white point and gamma, and it will result in a "calibrated sRGB monitor".

In other words, if the standard sRGB profile is used in the by XP,
does the calibration give good results? That would ensure that, when
switching to Linux, the calibration would remain the same and the
colors would be accurate for all applications.

If your applications in Linux are all assuming an sRGB monitor, then yes this would pretty much work, even though you aren't able to install a color profile on Linux.

One last thing way to put it.... I want to calibrate the monitor,
then connect it to a different computer and still have a calibrated
monitor which is accurate for sRGB. Is it too much to ask?

As long as you are using DVI (digital) video, then you can do this, since the calibration is stored in the display, not the video card. If you are using analog video you will have less accurate results.

See this thread for what to check:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1004&message=25228409

-- hide signature --

Will Hollingworth
Manager of OEM Product Design & Development Engineering
NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.

Carl Robitaille New Member • Posts: 20
Re: NEC 2490WUXi rocks! sRGB looks great.

Hi Will,

Thanks again for the great info you provide here.

Will49 wrote:

The sRGB mode is not calibratable on either models (it's a factory
preset). However since the 2490 is basically an sRGB gamut monitor,
you can calibrate the monitor in it's Programmable mode to sRGB's
white point and gamma, and it will result in a "calibrated sRGB
monitor".

Cool, that's what I wanted.

If your applications in Linux are all assuming an sRGB monitor, then
yes this would pretty much work, even though you aren't able to
install a color profile on Linux.

My understanding is that, if no profile is used (on Linux or otherwise), sRGB is the prefered choice so that the content is displayed correctly everywhere (w/o profile attached to the file of course).

I know it's not ideal for printing, and I would have gone for a wide gamut monitor if the sRGB mode was better. I'll consider one when color management is used in all the apps and OS I use. Until then, what I need is a calibrated sRGB monitor.

As long as you are using DVI (digital) video, then you can do this,
since the calibration is stored in the display, not the video card.
If you are using analog video you will have less accurate results.

Great!

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1004&message=25228409

Thanks for the link. For whatever reason, it didn't show up in my searches. I'll have one last question that I'll post in the other thread.

(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 21,009
To all the fellows above

Based on this thread, I bought the 2490 today, will hook it up soon.

It better be good, otherwise I have a long list above to complain.
I prefer to keep is as a Thank YOU ALL list.

B.Rgds

wtlloyd Senior Member • Posts: 1,243
Hmmm

guess I'd better read this thread all the way through.....

bionet Senior Member • Posts: 1,072
Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

Sorry for bumping up this old thread, but the 2490 is not available in Europe so I really wonder if the 2690's native mode can be calibrated to display proper sRGB, completely disabling the extended gamut.
I'd appreciate if someone could tell me if this is possible.

RJSPhotography Senior Member • Posts: 1,686
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

great thread!!

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Carl Robitaille New Member • Posts: 20
Re: Just got off the phone with NEC

PicOne wrote:

I don't understand this at all.. sorry for being dense. The
monitor itself has an sRGB setting? And, why exactly can't a
hardware device (eg. EyeOne) run calibration on the monitor when in
this setting to create a profile?

It's a great question that I asked in the past. Will from NEC answered it:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1004&message=25815765

Graystar Veteran Member • Posts: 8,373
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

bionet wrote:

Sorry for bumping up this old thread, but the 2490 is not available
in Europe so I really wonder if the 2690's native mode can be
calibrated to display proper sRGB, completely disabling the extended
gamut.

Of course it can. There's nothing to disable.

This is an sRGB, 8-bit monitor. It can only display 16.7 million colors at any given time. It just so happens that it can select those 16.7 million colors from a palette of 69 billion colors. That selection is done through calibration. You want sRGB calibration? fine. You want some other custom calibration? No problem. You can have different calibrations and use which ever is most suitable for the current task. Most likely, you'll just want to use sRGB all the time.

Good Luck!

UCSB
UCSB Contributing Member • Posts: 993
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

Graystar wrote:

bionet wrote:

Sorry for bumping up this old thread, but the 2490 is not available
in Europe so I really wonder if the 2690's native mode can be
calibrated to display proper sRGB, completely disabling the extended
gamut.

Of course it can. There's nothing to disable.

This is an sRGB, 8-bit monitor. It can only display 16.7 million
colors at any given time. It just so happens that it can select
those 16.7 million colors from a palette of 69 billion colors. That
selection is done through calibration. You want sRGB calibration?
fine. You want some other custom calibration? No problem. You can
have different calibrations and use which ever is most suitable for
the current task. Most likely, you'll just want to use sRGB all the
time.

Good Luck!

I must be missing something in this post because it seems to be saying that the 2690 is a sRGB monitor. It is not, it is 92% of aRGB. It can not be calibrated to serve as a sRGB monitor. You have to calibrate the monitor and then use color managed applications for accurate color when working with sRGB content. But, if you are editing using an sRGB color space in Photoshop (or similar) then you will be seeing sRGB results.

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Bill.

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UCSB
UCSB Contributing Member • Posts: 993
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

bionet wrote:

Sorry for bumping up this old thread, but the 2490 is not available
in Europe so I really wonder if the 2690's native mode can be
calibrated to display proper sRGB, completely disabling the extended
gamut.
I'd appreciate if someone could tell me if this is possible.

No, you can not calibrate it to just work like a sRGB monitor. The monitor does have a sRGB mode that you can not calibrate, but it not very accurate. sRGB content is fine is color managed applications. This is not a problem for me. If you could ask a more specific question, like which software or application areas are you most concerned with.

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Bill.

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Graystar Veteran Member • Posts: 8,373
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

Yes, you’re missing something. You’re missing the spec, which says the monitor is limited to a palette of 16.7 million colors at one time.

"Internal 12-bit Look Up Tables (LUTs) allows the display of 16.7 million colors out of a palette of 69 billion"

“93% Adobe RGB coverage” refers solely to the range of colors that can be potentially displayed. That has nothing to do with the implementation of the Adobe RGB standard in any form within the monitor. A 16.7 million color limitation makes the monitor an 8-bit monitor. Review of the spec and features show that only sRGB is built into the monitor, which would be in line with the 8-bit display. So you’re either in sRGB mode or you’re not (exactly like high end CRTs.) That makes it an sRGB monitor. Which is really all it can be, because unless you have a special video card designed to output 10 bit color, all regular video cards expect to connect to sRGB devices.

High end CRTs were able to surpass the sRGB color space, and as analog devices could display billions of colors. This is no different. Having such a color range and 12-bit LUTs makes it easier to get the 16.7 million colors that matter to you. If that happens to be the colors that perfectly match sRGB, then that’s what you use. If you want to create a palette that matches your printer to get a better match to output, then you use that instead. Or maybe you want to create a palette that matched your camera to get a better idea of what you’re capturing. You can do that as well.

But no matter what, you’re always limited to 16.7 million colors, and color management always sees the monitor as an sRGB device.

I don't know who came up with the idea that a device designed to be calibrated to any desired color set could somehow not be calibrated to a specific set of colors that is clearly within its range...but I would take further advice from such person with a grain of salt.

Will49 Regular Member • Posts: 225
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

There are so many incorrect items in this post I'm not really sure where to begin.

First I would recommend you read the following white paper. While it is intended to be about an LED monitor, the wide gamut explanations are valid for other monitors such as the LCD2690.

http://www.necdisplay.com/cms/documents/TechnologyPapers/LCD2180WG-LEDTechPaper_121605.pdf

Graystar wrote:

Yes, you’re missing something. You’re missing the spec, which says
the monitor is limited to a palette of 16.7 million colors at one
time.

"Internal 12-bit Look Up Tables (LUTs) allows the display of 16.7
million colors out of a palette of 69 billion"

“93% Adobe RGB coverage” refers solely to the range of colors that
can be potentially displayed. That has nothing to do with the
implementation of the Adobe RGB standard in any form within the
monitor.

Totally incorrect. The gamut size has nothing to do with the "bit depth" or LUTs in the monitor.

A 16.7 million color limitation makes the monitor an 8-bit
monitor.

No it doesn't. Using this logic, then there is no such thing as a > 8 bit consumer monitor because currently the maximum bit depth output from a Mac or PC is 8 bits per color per pixel. It's what you do to those 8 bits inside the monitor that makes it a > 8 bit monitor - but again, that has nothing to do with the gamut.

Review of the spec and features show that only sRGB is
built into the monitor, which would be in line with the 8-bit
display.

Again the bit depth has nothing to do with the monitor gamut being sRGB or ARGB. You could make a 4 or 16 bit monitor with ARGB coverage.

So you’re either in sRGB mode or you’re not (exactly like
high end CRTs.) That makes it an sRGB monitor. Which is really all
it can be, because unless you have a special video card designed to
output 10 bit color, all regular video cards expect to connect to
sRGB devices.

Again totally incorrect. The video card has absolutely nothing to do with the gamut of the monitor. Video cards don't "expect" to be connected to any specific gamut of monitor.

Current operating systems (Mac OS and Windows), applications (i.e. Photoshop) color management systems (ColorSync etc), graphics cards and digital video interfaces are currently limited to rendering 8 bit color to the display.

High end CRTs were able to surpass the sRGB color space, and as
analog devices could display billions of colors.

No. Bit depth doesn't increase color gamut. High end CRTs were not able to surpass sRGB because they were analog. It has nothing to do with being analog or digital. There was only one commercially available wide gamut CRT display and that was sold by NEC/Mitsubishi about 5-6 years ago and cost about $5000.

This is no
different. Having such a color range and 12-bit LUTs makes it easier
to get the 16.7 million colors that matter to you. If that happens
to be the colors that perfectly match sRGB, then that’s what you use.

If you want to create a palette that matches your printer to get a
better match to output, then you use that instead. Or maybe you want
to create a palette that matched your camera to get a better idea of
what you’re capturing. You can do that as well.

This is incorrect on so many different levels. You don't create a monitor palette to match your output, or anything else.

But no matter what, you’re always limited to 16.7 million colors, and
color management always sees the monitor as an sRGB device.

Incorrect.

I don't know who came up with the idea that a device designed to be
calibrated to any desired color set could somehow not be calibrated
to a specific set of colors that is clearly within its range...but I
would take further advice from such person with a grain of salt.

I would recommend taking some time to learn the basics of color gamuts, color transforms, color calibration and color management.

Getting a wide gamut monitor to emulate an sRGB monitor in terms of gamut can not be done by calibration alone. There are sophisticated 3D gamut mapping transforms that need to be done. Sure you can calibrate the white point and gamma, but that does absolutely nothing to the color gamut which is the major issue that is being discussed here.

-- hide signature --

Will Hollingworth
Manager of OEM Product Design & Development Engineering
NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.

Brian Miller
Brian Miller Regular Member • Posts: 475
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

Thanks, Will.

Graystar Veteran Member • Posts: 8,373
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

Will49 wrote:

There are so many incorrect items in this post I'm not really sure
where to begin.

Right back at ya.

First I would recommend you read the following white paper.

Thanks but I already read it.

Graystar wrote:

Yes, you’re missing something. You’re missing the spec, which says
the monitor is limited to a palette of 16.7 million colors at one
time.

"Internal 12-bit Look Up Tables (LUTs) allows the display of 16.7
million colors out of a palette of 69 billion"

“93% Adobe RGB coverage” refers solely to the range of colors that
can be potentially displayed. That has nothing to do with the
implementation of the Adobe RGB standard in any form within the
monitor.

Totally incorrect. The gamut size has nothing to do with the "bit
depth" or LUTs in the monitor.

Did you read what I wrote? Where did I ever equated or related the gamut size to the bit depth? And that’s not even the point of the statements you quoted. My statement points out that the monitor in question (which is NOT the LCD2180WG-LED which you linked to) is limited to a palette of 16.7 million colors at any given time. The number of colors that can be displayed is limited to a 24-bit palette, and THAT is correct.

A 16.7 million color limitation makes the monitor an 8-bit
monitor.

No it doesn't. Using this logic, then there is no such thing as a > 8
bit consumer monitor because currently the maximum bit depth output
from a Mac or PC is 8 bits per color per pixel. It's what you do to
those 8 bits inside the monitor that makes it a > 8 bit monitor - but
again, that has nothing to do with the gamut.

Review of the spec and features show that only sRGB is
built into the monitor, which would be in line with the 8-bit
display.

Again the bit depth has nothing to do with the monitor gamut being
sRGB or ARGB. You could make a 4 or 16 bit monitor with ARGB coverage.

And again, where do you see me saying that the bit depth is limiting, or equating, or relating to the gamut??

The problem here is that you’ve taken my comments out of their intended context. You didn’t follow the previous trail of posts that led to these comments, which was as a response to someone who believe that the workings of this monitor is related to the aRGB standard. My point, which you totally missed so I’ll reword, is that the aRGB standard is a 16-bit standard. If you want to work in that standard then you must shuttle around 16-bit color information. However, there is no 16-bit color processing going on, or even any way to get 16-bit color information from an image that Photoshop is trying to display, to the display itself. The set of standards that comprise the Adobe RGB color set isn’t used in any way, shape, or form within this monitor or any of its processing.

This monitor will only accept 8-bit data per color channel as input on the DVI connection, as per the DVI specification. As far as I can tell there is no DVI-dual link mode to get greater color information to this monitor. The bit depth limits the number of colors in the displayable palette. If you want to display a different set of 16.7 million colors from the available 69 billion, then you have to change the palette. But I never said that the monitor doesn’t really have 69 billion colors and that those colors don’t cover 93% of the aRGB gamut...of course it does.

If what I’ve just said is incorrect then I’ll be more than happy to read and accept your explanation of how you can get an LCD2690WUXi to accept 10 or 12 bit color data from the OS, and have an active palette of greater than 16.7 million colors.

So you’re either in sRGB mode or you’re not (exactly like
high end CRTs.) That makes it an sRGB monitor. Which is really all
it can be, because unless you have a special video card designed to
output 10 bit color, all regular video cards expect to connect to
sRGB devices.

Again totally incorrect. The video card has absolutely nothing to do
with the gamut of the monitor. Video cards don't "expect" to be
connected to any specific gamut of monitor.

And again, and again and again where do you see me saying that the gamut is limited by anything?? I don’t even see the word “gamut” in my quote!

Current operating systems (Mac OS and Windows), applications (i.e.
Photoshop) color management systems (ColorSync etc), graphics cards
and digital video interfaces are currently limited to rendering 8 bit
color to the display.

Well at least we agree on something (I’ll just put aside Matrox’s Parhelia Gigacolor technology and their Photoshop plugin for seeing 10-bit since it’s far from the norm.)

High end CRTs were able to surpass the sRGB color space, and as
analog devices could display billions of colors.

No. Bit depth doesn't increase color gamut.

You have GOT to learn how to read!! You’re just filling in all this stuff from your head! First of all, where do I mention bit depth in that quote?? I didn’t say bit depth increased the gamut. CRTs can divide up the gamut they have into more than 16.7 million choices because they’re analog...they simply process the voltage levels that are given to them. That’s what technologies such as Matrox Gigacolor and ATI’s Avivo do. These graphic cards can output 10 bit data on a DVI dual link (which the LCD2180WG-LED would like) or a regular analog signal with more finely divided voltage levels, thus expanding the palette to a billion colors. But palette does not equal gamut, which is something you seem to think I keep saying.

High end CRTs were not
able to surpass sRGB because they were analog.

The Radius Pressview did and the Sony Artisan did as well as the very expensive Barco Reference monitor.

This is too tiring. Thanks for you expertise.

PS: What's OmniColor?

Will49 Regular Member • Posts: 225
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

High end CRTs were not
able to surpass sRGB because they were analog.

The Radius Pressview did and the Sony Artisan did as well as the very
expensive Barco Reference monitor.

Actually they weren't. I was on the design team of the Radius Pressview chassis at Mitsubishi Japan, and know firsthand it used a DiamondTron CRT which had P22/EBU phosphors. The gamut of P22/EBU is actually slightly smaller than sRGB. Sony CRTs were pretty close to P22/EBU with a slightly different red phosphor. If I remember correctly Barco used a Hitachi CRT which was also very close to P22/EBU.

This is too tiring. Thanks for you expertise.

You are welcome. Thanks for you advice on learning to read.

PS: What's OmniColor?

It's the marketing name for the 6 axis color controls that allow you to adjust the hue, saturation and brightness of red, green, blue, cyan, magenta and yellow colors using the display's color processor.

-- hide signature --

Will Hollingworth
Manager of OEM Product Design & Development Engineering
NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.

Will49 Regular Member • Posts: 225
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

Graystar wrote:

Review of the spec and features show that only sRGB is
built into the monitor, which would be in line with the 8-bit
display.

Again the bit depth has nothing to do with the monitor gamut being
sRGB or ARGB. You could make a 4 or 16 bit monitor with ARGB coverage.

And again, where do you see me saying that the bit depth is limiting,
or equating, or relating to the gamut??

Well when you say:

"A 16.7 million color limitation makes the monitor an 8-bit monitor. Review of the spec and features show that only sRGB is built into the monitor, which would be in line with the 8-bit display. So you’re either in sRGB mode or you’re not (exactly like high end CRTs.) That makes it an sRGB monitor."

So my interpretation of what you are saying, and I think that of others reading this is:
a) This is an 8 bit monitor because it only accepts 8 bit video inputs
b) Only having an 8 bit input makes this an "sRGB" monitor.

Apologies if this interpretation is not what you intended.

The problem here is that you’ve taken my comments out of their
intended context. You didn’t follow the previous trail of posts that
led to these comments, which was as a response to someone who believe
that the workings of this monitor is related to the aRGB standard.
My point, which you totally missed so I’ll reword, is that the aRGB
standard is a 16-bit standard.

The only time bit depth appears in the ARGB spec is relating to image encoding which has nothing to do with how many bits are sent to the display (which is not defined as part of the spec). The encoding spec for ARGB allows for 8 and 16 bits.

If you want to work in that standard
then you must shuttle around 16-bit color information. However,
there is no 16-bit color processing going on, or even any way to get
16-bit color information from an image that Photoshop is trying to
display, to the display itself.

So by your logic only a display with a 16 bit input is capable of being an "ARGB" display.

Again there is nothing in the ARGB spec about bit depth other than for encoding.

The set of standards that comprise
the Adobe RGB color set isn’t used in any way, shape, or form within
this monitor or any of its processing.

It is correct to say the display does not do any gamut processing to try and fit it's gamut into that of ARGB (which it can't entirely because it is smaller than that of ARGB in the green).

However, the ARGB spec defines (among other things)
a) White Point of D65
b) Gamma of 2.2
c) Red, Green and Blue color primaries

When a display is calibrated, a) and b) are taken care of using the monitor's processing and LUTs. The display's color primaries form the color gamut which in the case of the LCD2690 is slightly smaller than that of the ARGB spec. This is where the 93% value comes in. The CMS will take care of c), mapping ARGB into the display's actual gamut by the use of the ICC profile.

This monitor will only accept 8-bit data per color channel as input
on the DVI connection, as per the DVI specification. As far as I can
tell there is no DVI-dual link mode to get greater color information
to this monitor. The bit depth limits the number of colors in the
displayable palette. If you want to display a different set of 16.7
million colors from the available 69 billion, then you have to change
the palette. But I never said that the monitor doesn’t really have
69 billion colors and that those colors don’t cover 93% of the aRGB
gamut...of course it does.

If what I’ve just said is incorrect then I’ll be more than happy to
read and accept your explanation of how you can get an LCD2690WUXi to
accept 10 or 12 bit color data from the OS, and have an active
palette of greater than 16.7 million colors.

What you stated above is correct.

It is important for everyone to understand that the "palette of 16.7M out of 69 billion" does not change the range or gamut of the display when using 1D LUTs. The palette and LUTs are used to choose the optimal 16.7M levels when making tone corrections (i.e. white point and gamma corrections) to reduce or eliminate color banding which you would otherwise get in a 8 bit x 8 bit LUT system.

So you’re either in sRGB mode or you’re not (exactly like
high end CRTs.) That makes it an sRGB monitor. Which is really all
it can be, because unless you have a special video card designed to
output 10 bit color, all regular video cards expect to connect to
sRGB devices.

Again totally incorrect. The video card has absolutely nothing to do
with the gamut of the monitor. Video cards don't "expect" to be
connected to any specific gamut of monitor.

And again, and again and again where do you see me saying that the
gamut is limited by anything?? I don’t even see the word “gamut” in
my quote!

Well when someone refers to a monitor as being sRGB, ARGB or whatever, they are referring to the color gamut. OK you didn't use the word "gamut", but that is what is inferred.

You have GOT to learn how to read!! You’re just filling in all this
stuff from your head! First of all, where do I mention bit depth in
that quote?? I didn’t say bit depth increased the gamut. CRTs can
divide up the gamut they have into more than 16.7 million choices
because they’re analog...they simply process the voltage levels that
are given to them. That’s what technologies such as Matrox Gigacolor
and ATI’s Avivo do. These graphic cards can output 10 bit data on a
DVI dual link (which the LCD2180WG-LED would like) or a regular
analog signal with more finely divided voltage levels, thus expanding
the palette to a billion colors. But palette does not equal gamut,
which is something you seem to think I keep saying.

OK thank you for the clarification.

-- hide signature --

Will Hollingworth
Manager of OEM Product Design & Development Engineering
NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.

Graystar Veteran Member • Posts: 8,373
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

Will49 wrote:

So my interpretation of what you are saying, and I think that of
others reading this is:
a) This is an 8 bit monitor because it only accepts 8 bit video inputs
b) Only having an 8 bit input makes this an "sRGB" monitor.

Actually that’s pretty close. Because it’s an 8-bit input I call it an 8-bit monitor in reference to the input. As I’m sure you well know, being a 10-bit input monitor adds thousands of dollars to the price tag, so it’s a significant distinction. In the future I’ll try to spell it out...it’s an 8-bit input monitor.

I refer to the monitor as an sRGB monitor because that is the only color system that is built into the monitor. The monitor can clearly do more, but in terms of operating in concert with a standard, sRGB is the only one.

The only time bit depth appears in the ARGB spec is relating to image
encoding which has nothing to do with how many bits are sent to the
display (which is not defined as part of the spec). The encoding spec
for ARGB allows for 8 and 16 bits.

Yes, correct and that’s a clarification I never made. Again, it was an issue of context. I think people believe that they are going to somehow get 93% of their aRGB, 16-bit color values out of their images and into the monitor somehow to be displayed. As far as I know this is currently impossible.

So by your logic only a display with a 16 bit input is capable of
being an "ARGB" display.
Again there is nothing in the ARGB spec about bit depth other than
for encoding.

As you’ve clarified, aRGB can be specified in 8 bits. Once again it’s a question of context at the time my statement was made in order to address any expectations of silky-smooth 16-bit aRGB gradients being displayed.

the ARGB spec defines ...
When a display is calibrated...

Yes, that’s exactly what I thought and would expect, and would want when working with aRGB images.

It is important for everyone to understand that the "palette of 16.7M
out of 69 billion" does not change the range or gamut of the display

Yes, and if any of my statements were read otherwise then I apologize for that. This monitor kicks butt. As happens so often in these discussions, not enough words were used to completely convey the thought. I’ll make sure my future posts are even more wordy!

HowardC Forum Member • Posts: 66
Re: Hmmm

Just marking this thread. Thanks for the information

Graystar Veteran Member • Posts: 8,373
Re: Calibration to sRGB in aRGB mode possible?

Just noticed that I missed this...

Will49 wrote:

Actually they weren't. I was on the design team of the Radius
Pressview...

Hmmm. Well, the charts I've see have it as slightly larger in most areas and smaller in other areas, but I'll defer to first-hand knowledge and accept what you say. Thanks for clarifying.

PS: What's OmniColor?

It's the marketing name for the 6 axis color controls that allow you
to adjust the hue, saturation and brightness of red, green, blue,
cyan, magenta and yellow colors using the display's color processor.

It's a little bit more than that, isn't it?

"Allows LCD-based monitors to achieve standard sRGB color and create precise color images for still images, moving pictures and, in particular, for real-time videos. It uses 6-axis color data in its calculations, thereby using the color the color reproduction limits of the original devices to their full extent. It also enables the correction of an individual color without affecting the other colors of the image. A range of colors is freely available, so the user can simply, yet precisely, control individual color reproduction."

http://www.necdisplay.com/Products/Product/?product=9bd245b5-7b0f-4f52-9ac3-37506ddc9775

http://www.nec-display-solutions.com/specials/online_englisch/srgb/index_oc.html

Again, the point being that I have a very hard time believing that this monitor, with its color ability and all its technology, can't produce a calibration that matches sRGB when so much effort has been made to ensure that it can.

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