Does this Photographer know some stuff or what?

Started Sep 24, 2007 | Discussions
cspringer Forum Pro • Posts: 19,632
hmmmm....

if you look at the same area on the left of the tree you can tell that he copied the same bush over and over 3 times. I've never really studied his edits this closely and didn't notice the flaws. His pictures are outstanding but at least on this one, he could have done better. It does make you want to find the nearest oak tree or something similar and pose some kids...extract it and add a interesting wooded background (Perhaps if you took some early morning shots in the woods with the fog and light streaming through).

Dave Jaseck wrote:

On this one, and if so, how many others. If you zoom in on the
backside of the boys legs on the right, you'll see a bit of lighter
pixels along his leg which are lighter than the overall background
indicating an extract or selection of sorts. If this is the case,
gives him a lot of latitude with what he does with the background,
blur, color, saturation etc. If he does this on others, this guy
must spend a lot of time on those images which are brilliant non the
less. But I still think the kids are actors for him and well posed.
--
Dave
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http://www.pbase.com/davidjaseck/photoart

chekist
chekist Senior Member • Posts: 2,418
Re: Dramatic lighting...

Could you please tell us how you produce such natural looking haze and light rays?
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(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 10,011
Re: If you think this thread is of interest here check this out!

Dave Jaseck wrote:

From the Canon SLR 20/30/40D forum. Lot of people there want their
pictures perfect, straight out of the camera, no post processing (not
everyone,2 camps here). One comment said the mans work looked like a
Elvis painting on black velvet!

You find the same attitude on the lighting techniques forum -- gear heads who think that if you don't get the lighting right in the studio, you just have to re-shoot. In their cramped view of things, nothing you can do in Photoshop qualifies as a lighting technique. It's just fakery after the real creative work has been done.
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carl english
carl english Veteran Member • Posts: 9,182
Re: Pam r

Very nice.

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cspringer Forum Pro • Posts: 19,632
painterly effect.

If you look at his portfolio the people have a painterly effect which adds to the drama. It no longer looks like a photo but a hybrid with painted people and more natural looking backgrounds.
http://photo.net/photos/rarindra

cspringer wrote:
if you look at the same area on the left of the tree you can tell
that he copied the same bush over and over 3 times. I've never really
studied his edits this closely and didn't notice the flaws. His
pictures are outstanding but at least on this one, he could have done
better. It does make you want to find the nearest oak tree or
something similar and pose some kids...extract it and add a
interesting wooded background (Perhaps if you took some early morning
shots in the woods with the fog and light streaming through).

Dave Jaseck wrote:

On this one, and if so, how many others. If you zoom in on the
backside of the boys legs on the right, you'll see a bit of lighter
pixels along his leg which are lighter than the overall background
indicating an extract or selection of sorts. If this is the case,
gives him a lot of latitude with what he does with the background,
blur, color, saturation etc. If he does this on others, this guy
must spend a lot of time on those images which are brilliant non the
less. But I still think the kids are actors for him and well posed.
--
Dave
http://www.pbase.com/davidjaseck/photographs
http://www.pbase.com/davidjaseck/photorestorations
http://www.pbase.com/davidjaseck/retouching_forum
http://www.pbase.com/davidjaseck/panopictures
http://www.pbase.com/davidjaseck/photoart

ashfaq Forum Member • Posts: 82
Re: Does this Photographer know some stuff or what?

This thread is becoming very interesitng..
Check this out, same kind of work from Andre Arment

http://photo.net/photos/Andre%20Arment

but i can also see few photos similar to that of Rarendra prakarsa.

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chekist
chekist Senior Member • Posts: 2,418
Re: Dramatic lighting...

Thanks a lot, this is a great collection of links! Do you have another collection on creating haze effect? I imagine this is something trivial, but I have been wrong before.
--
Eugene

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Greg Henry Veteran Member • Posts: 3,841
Very different

Very different. While not every single shot is perfect, what in life is? LOL Nice to see something that's not the norm for a change.

Pam R Veteran Member • Posts: 3,421
Rarindra style workflow...
1

There are many things going on in Rarindra's images. It's a lot of labor intensive, detail work. That's probably why you don't see him put out a new work every week : )

There are some noticeable characteristics to his work. He separates the image into foreground/subject/background elements. Almost like a theatrical stage or a diorama. In this particular image, I would guess he has extracted the kids/tree foreground and placed it onto the background image. How do I know? The sun is very bright. It's so bright it's almost blowing out the backs of the boys. Yet the background is receiving a completely different quality of light. If the background light were the same, there would be blown out branches, leaves, and trunks of trees all over the bg.

http://www.fotocommunity.com/pc/pc/mypics/574065/display/6017791

He also uses contrast, sharpness, and color to further separate fg from bg. In the same image, for example, the bg is slightly blurred and lower contrast. This puts the bg on a completely different plane. It looks almost like a theatrical backdrop.

For the backgrounds, he basically uses colored gradients in normal mode and multiply modes and lowers the opacity. These modes are important because they don't affect the contrast, they simply tone down the brightness while keeping the contrast low.

I used some of these techniques on this image to illustrate:

The original image:

After adding a little more drama:

First, start with an image that has strong backlighting or sidelighting. The work will be easier and the result more natural.

Second, masking is very important to separate the foreground from the background. On this image, you really only need to fuss with creating one mask for the little girl:

I think gradients are key to getting the look of Rarindra's images. The gradations in his work are very smooth, they don't have the look of brush work. So I've used only gradients, not brushes on this image, including the masks.

When you use gradients on a mask, be sure to set your colors to the default of black foreground/white background (hit the "D" key to set them). Also, be sure your gradient is set to "foreground to transparent". To set the gradient, click on the gradient in the options bar and choose these settings:

I used linear gradients to work on larger areas:

And radial gradients to work on smaller areas and switched between the 2:

OK, on to the image. First, we'll start adding some "haze" to separate the foreground from the background. Here's the original image as a comparsion:

A little more for depth. This was added in multiply mode at a lower opacity:

Increasing the contrast a little using levels:

Now to construct some rays. I have written a tut on making rays earlier. I tried something new this time because I wanted thicker rays but still have them be somewhat random. Here's how I did these rays:

First, I made a selection of an area of the tree (at full resolution). Then I copied and pasted it as a new image. I converted it to b+w, then ran levels to get some whites and dark grays. Then I ran motion blur on it.

Here's the previous tut that will explain the settings a bit more clearly:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1006&message=24825869

I then pasted the rays image onto a new layer, and transformed them to shape using the transform tool. After you've shaped them and moved them into position, set the blend mode to "Overlay" (or whatever mode you prefer). Now run gaussian blur to taste and adjust the opacity:

I get a more natural result by adding a second rays layer, and moving it slightly out of the previous rays position. Then try different blend modes and blur amounts. Sometimes a soft light ray layer works well with another ray layer in overlay mode. Experiment to get the best results for your image:

The final image:

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Pam
http://www.pbase.com/pam_r
'art is working on something 'til you like it...then leaving it that way'

(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 10,011
Excellent, Pam

Thanks for all the detail. I'm sure you're right about the importance of separating the foregound very carefully. In this image, I feel sure that R painstakingly masked out the leaves, leaving the gaps where the background shows through:
http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=6386450

I also agree that some of the gradients are in normal mode (reduced opacity) to achieve that hazy effect.

Well done. Thanks again.

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Kent C Forum Pro • Posts: 25,803
Re: Rarindra style workflow...

Nice! and thanks. I used photo filter on the 'ray' layer and picked a color for use in that on the example above. I overdid it but that can be effective.
--
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tutorial archive:
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Pam R Veteran Member • Posts: 3,421
Ooops...Rarindra style workflow updated : )
1

I left out one of the steps. Not a big deal but this might make it a bit clearer. Must have been that Peano moonshine in my glass ; )

There are many things going on in Rarindra's images. It's a lot of labor intensive, detail work. That's probably why you don't see him put out a new work every week : )

There are some noticeable characteristics to his work. He separates the image into foreground/subject/background elements. Almost like a theatrical stage or a diorama. In this particular image, I would guess he has extracted the kids/tree foreground and placed it onto the background image. How do I know? The sun is very bright. It's so bright it's almost blowing out the backs of the boys. Yet the background is receiving a completely different quality of light. If the background light were the same, there would be blown out branches, leaves, and trunks of trees all over the bg.

http://www.fotocommunity.com/pc/pc/mypics/574065/display/6017791

He also uses contrast, sharpness, and color to further separate fg from bg. In the same image, for example, the bg is slightly blurred and lower contrast. This puts the bg on a completely different plane. It looks almost like a theatrical backdrop.

For the backgrounds, he basically uses colored gradients in normal mode and multiply modes and lowers the opacity. These modes are important because they don't affect the contrast, they simply tone down the brightness while keeping the contrast low.

I used some of these techniques on this image to illustrate:

Before:

After adding a little more drama:

First, start with an image that has strong backlighting or sidelighting. The work will be easier and the result more natural.

Second, masking is very important to separate the foreground from the background. On this image, you really only need to fuss with creating one mask for the little girl:

I think gradients are key to getting the look of Rarindra's images. The gradations in his work are very smooth, they don't have the look of brush work. So I've used only gradients, not brushes on this image, including the masks.

When you use gradients on a mask, be sure to set your colors to the default of black foreground/white background (hit the "D" key to set them). Also, be sure your gradient is set to "foreground to transparent". To set the gradient, click on the gradient in the options bar and choose these settings:

I used linear gradients to work on larger areas:

And radial gradients to work on smaller areas and switched between the 2:

OK, on to the image. First, we'll start adding some "haze" to separate the foreground from the background. Here's the original image as a comparsion:

A little more for depth. This was added in multiply mode at a lower opacity:

Increasing the contrast a little using levels:

Now to construct some rays. I have written a tut on making rays earlier. I tried something new this time because I wanted thicker rays but still have them be somewhat random. Here's how I did these rays:

First, I made a selection of an area of the tree (at full resolution). Then I copied and pasted it as a new image. I converted it to b+w, then ran levels to get some whites and dark grays. Then I ran motion blur on it.

Here's the previous tut that will explain the settings a bit more clearly:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1006&message=24825869

I then pasted the rays image onto a new layer, and transformed them to shape using the transform tool. After you've shaped them and moved them into position, set the blend mode to "Overlay" (or whatever mode you prefer). Now run gaussian blur to taste and adjust the opacity:

I get a more natural result by adding a second rays layer, and moving it slightly out of the previous rays position. Then try different blend modes and blur amounts. Sometimes a soft light ray layer works well with another ray layer in overlay mode. Experiment to get the best results for your image:

The final image:

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Pam
http://www.pbase.com/pam_r
'art is working on something 'til you like it...then leaving it that way'

Pam R Veteran Member • Posts: 3,421
Re: Excellent, Pam

Peano wrote:

Thanks for all the detail. I'm sure you're right about the importance
of separating the foregound very carefully. In this image, I feel
sure that R painstakingly masked out the leaves, leaving the gaps
where the background shows through:
http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=6386450

Thank you, Peano : )

Yeah. I think there is a lot of work involved in getting his "look", don't you think? I never realized just how much until I took a closer look after reading Dave's post. But what's interesting is going back to his early stuff to see how he's refined his technique. Just like Dragan when he had his old works online.

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Pam
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'art is working on something 'til you like it...then leaving it that way'

Pam R Veteran Member • Posts: 3,421
Re: Rarindra style workflow...

Kent C wrote:

Nice! and thanks. I used photo filter on the 'ray' layer and picked a
color for use in that on the example above. I overdid it but that can
be effective.

Ahhh...that's a great tip, Kent. I just played with it. If you clip the photo filter layer to the ray layer you can make some subtle color changes to the light rays. Thank you! : )

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Pam
http://www.pbase.com/pam_r
'art is working on something 'til you like it...then leaving it that way'

Gediminas 8 Senior Member • Posts: 1,133
Re: Check different sites for method

kbalaz wrote:

When you look at the pictures, the people in them appear in many
different images but they are the exact same picture just pp
differently, I saw at least 4 different images where the boy and girl
in the picture were in the exact same pose just different backgrounds.

Also, the lighting scheme is basically the same in most of his images, as if shot once, coloured in a different tone and added as background to a new subject.

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Gediminas 8 Senior Member • Posts: 1,133
LOL

Peano wrote:

I'm not as thunk as you drink I am.

:))))

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Pictus
Pictus Veteran Member • Posts: 6,371
Thanks for the tutorial Pam R!

Just a quick experiment, I am too tired/lazy right now(2:44am), but
could not resist a try...

RayGuselli
RayGuselli Forum Pro • Posts: 15,897
My favourite photogapher...............

Have said it before but this guy is my favourite photogapher.....

Interesting because some of his images are not taken with expensive kit but just look what he achieves!!!

I made some very humble atempts to try to copy his style and came up with these in another forum.

Pam, great work and a super workflow.....many thanks

Ray

ps...two gifs may take a while to load

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