Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

Started Dec 14, 2006 | Discussions
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SuitePhoto Forum Member • Posts: 72
Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

I'm trying to shoot a ring that has a lot of engraving details on the side of it. And in order to show that along with the large main stone, I would like to make the ring stand-up at an angle (45 degrees or less) on a black reflective stage (black plexi). The idea is that the camera will view the ring at a flattering angle for the main stone and the reflective surface will help show the engraving detail on the sides.

In the past, I've been able to use modeling clay for such jobs, but this ring has a large main stone which puts a lot of weight on the 'floating' end, and is too much for the clay to handle. Does anyone have a suggestion for what other materials might make this work?

Thanks

SCR123 Regular Member • Posts: 293
Re: Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

Is this a wedding ring? If so, have a male subject hold the ring in his index finger and thumb and photograph as if he is presenting it to his bride........a typical wedding photograph. Use a very large, defused light source (softbox works great) and get the light and camera lense close to the ring where you can see the engraging and stone while framed by the fingers and hand of the one holding the ring. Because the lense will be focused on the ring, all else should fall softly out of focus around it (if your lense settings and light intensity is correct) giving emphasis to the ring only.

You may also get a pretty flower (A rose works well) and place the ring inside the pedasl enough so as to show the ring to its greatest effect. Same idea as above as far as focus fall off. You have to get the lense close to the ring.......almost having the ring fill the frame (almost).

Time to get the creative juices working............this can be a fun project for everyone.

benoit Senior Member • Posts: 1,047
Re: Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

My technique consist of pulling the ring from the bottom with the help of a tiny hole. The hole also help seat the ring in place so you have to determine first where to drill according to how much background you have and the angle of the camera.

1. Drill a tiny hole in your plexi and run a vaccum from under. It works but you have to like the noise! Your ring may be too heavy with the angle you are looking for. Try the second more complex but tested with success technique I have

2. Drill a tiny hole in your plexi, cut some fishing wire,that you'll close to make a circle. Loop the wire around the ring so you have it tight and run what's left of the wire throught the hole and run a pen throught that loop under the plexi. What I do then is take one or more rubber band that I loop around the pen and anchor the rubber band somewhere or attach extreme weight to it. If you try to move the rubber band anchor spot at various locations, you will eventually find the best tention for the angle of the ring you are looking for. Eventually, the fishing wire get stressed enough to expand and kind of keep the position. Because of the first loop around the ring, you actually control the tention in a fairly precise manner the only problem is that you get two lines to clone out if the wire shows.

3.The last solution is crazy glue and that works too, but it's more messy and not that precise.

SuitePhoto OP Forum Member • Posts: 72
Re: Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

Thanks for the input - and yes, it's my girlfriend's engagement ring (I'm going to use the picture when I present the ring).

The rose might be the best choice, but the fishing line sounds like the best idea if I want to stick with the plexi...

Has anyone ever used a hot glue gun? I would think that the hot glue would come off easier after I was done (when compared to super glue).

Thanks

Jim Salvas
Jim Salvas Veteran Member • Posts: 4,449
Re: Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

Have you tried wax? Melt a drop of clear wax and place the ring on it before it cools.
--
Jim

 Jim Salvas's gear list:Jim Salvas's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PM2 Olympus E-M1 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 II R Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 R Samyang 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye MFT +9 more
SuitePhoto OP Forum Member • Posts: 72
Re: Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

Jim Salvas wrote:

Have you tried wax? Melt a drop of clear wax and place the ring on
it before it cools.
--
Jim

Not a bad idea... I think I'll try that before I pull-out the hot-glue.

D W Senior Member • Posts: 1,969
I can tell you but I am going to have to kill you .....

Trade secret - Mortician wax. Easier to work with than plain wax.

-- hide signature --

Retired commercial photog - enjoying shooting for myself again.
Hoping to see/shoot as much as I can before the eyes and legs gives way

Bob Stothfang Senior Member • Posts: 1,153
You are going to need a bunch of bullets.....

Because you need to tell all of us where to get the mortician's wax.
--
Bob

Use the preview feature before you post your message to see if you any words or letrs out. You can check your links to see if they work too.

Duncan C Veteran Member • Posts: 7,660
Try "elephant snot"

A pro photographer who used to post here a couple of years ago told me about this concoction. The term is his, not mine. I laughed so hard I had trouble breathing when I read it.

Elephant snot is a 50 50 mixture of modeling clay and gum eraser. It's supposed to hold better than either one alone.

Hot glue should work, but it might leave some residue on the ring that would be hard to remove. I would NOT put super glue on the ring. You'll have a very hard time getting all the glue off the ring afterwards, especially if it has engraving on it.

Duncan C
--
dpreview and PBase supporter.

http://www.pbase.com/duncanc

Barrie Davis
Barrie Davis Forum Pro • Posts: 21,460
Re: Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

benoit wrote:

2. Drill a tiny hole in your plexi, cut some fishing wire,that
you'll close to make a circle. Loop the wire around the ring so you
have it tight and run what's left of the wire throught the hole
and run a pen throught that loop under the plexi. What I do then is
take one or more rubber band that I loop around the pen and anchor
the rubber band somewhere or attach extreme weight to it. If you
try to move the rubber band anchor spot at various locations, you
will eventually find the best tention for the angle of the ring you
are looking for. Eventually, the fishing wire get stressed enough
to expand and kind of keep the position. Because of the first loop
around the ring, you actually control the tention in a fairly
precise manner the only problem is that you get two lines to clone
out if the wire shows.

This is VERY similar to what I do for some items. I too use the finest fishing line as the actual fastener, but I put the tension on differently...

I use a length of nylon cord, (like the sort used as guy ropes in lightweight tents) in combination with a chunky rubber band (like the sort used in those same tent guys as shock absorbers) and then I apply the tension with one of those little "8" shaped sliding things (that I don't know the name of, but you find them holding the tension on guy ropes in lightweight tents!!).

Not surprisingly, I found all this gear at my local camping shop!!

Joking apart, the benefits are two. Because the length is adjustable it is easier to find a convenient anchor point around the set, and when the tension is on the rubber band keeps it good and even.

Note: A small hole in the plexi is not the end of its use for further shooting -- the clone tool hides a multitude of sins!
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Hmmm .. I wonder if I should start a thread on all those little gizmos and gadgets that, whilst not designed for photography, are invaluable in the studio because they are so adaptable and respond well to ingenuity in the user.

Could be interesting to see what you other guys do... [??]
--
Regards,
Baz

SuitePhoto OP Forum Member • Posts: 72
Re: Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

I just tried wax - normal candle wax - and it isn't strong enough...

The gum eraser is interesting... can you get it in black? I got black modeling clay because the stage is black...

benoit Senior Member • Posts: 1,047
Re: Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

All waxes are messy and not sticky enough especially in your case. I rarely use those. An other method if you do a clip and don't worry about the background is to use double sided clear tape. Hot glue is not practical and dirty. Cools off way too fast and the amount is hard to control. Most glues or wax are too thick and raise the product or the ring get dipped into what ever it is like a small volcano. Crazy glue requires very little amount and is easy to brake especially on a brand new polished ring. Like using with wax or any other sticky source ,you may need to get the ring polished after the shoot if you use crazy glue, but I never had a jeweler complain after I return the item.

SuitePhoto wrote:

I just tried wax - normal candle wax - and it isn't strong enough...

The gum eraser is interesting... can you get it in black? I got
black modeling clay because the stage is black...

benoit Senior Member • Posts: 1,047
Re: Jewelry Photography: How to make a ring stand-up

Barrie Davis wrote:

Note: A small hole in the plexi is not the end of its use for
further shooting -- the clone tool hides a multitude of sins!

No glue no wax, no trace to clean (and spread) ... job done, next...

D W Senior Member • Posts: 1,969
Funeral home supplier should have it.

They must buy it from somebody or just buy a pound or two from your local funeral home.

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Retired commercial photog - enjoying shooting for myself again.
Hoping to see/shoot as much as I can before the eyes and legs gives way

Jim Salvas
Jim Salvas Veteran Member • Posts: 4,449
Re: Funeral home supplier should have it.

B&H and Adorama sell wax suited for the purpose. Do a search for "holding wax."
--
Jim

 Jim Salvas's gear list:Jim Salvas's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PM2 Olympus E-M1 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 II R Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 R Samyang 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye MFT +9 more
qcpro Contributing Member • Posts: 987
Broncolor Impact 41 --help, Benoit !

Hi Benoît..

Hope you can help..

I'm being offered a set of 3 Broncolor Impact 41 heads..

The guy doesn't know what the power of these flashes is..

He says probably 400w/s

I've searched all over the net to find the answer without any luck..

Do you have that info ?

Thank you.. much appreciated..
regards
Lionel P

benoit Senior Member • Posts: 1,047
Re: Broncolor Impact 41 --help, Benoit !

I don't use mono but I found this link. It seem the 41 may be 300ws
http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=0071ZO

Good luck
Benoit

qcpro wrote:

Hi Benoît..

Hope you can help..

I'm being offered a set of 3 Broncolor Impact 41 heads..

The guy doesn't know what the power of these flashes is..

He says probably 400w/s

I've searched all over the net to find the answer without any luck..

Do you have that info ?

Thank you.. much appreciated..
regards
Lionel P

David L. Moore
David L. Moore Contributing Member • Posts: 807
Here you go
 David L. Moore's gear list:David L. Moore's gear list
Fujifilm FinePix X100 Nikon D610 Fujifilm X-T1 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 3,5/18 +8 more
bp1 Regular Member • Posts: 413
Re: Funeral home supplier should have it.

I reckon magician's wax (available at magic shops) or even hair wax could do the trick.

Jim Salvas wrote:

B&H and Adorama sell wax suited for the purpose. Do a search for
"holding wax."
--
Jim

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Click on my profile to see my equipment.

Peter Berressem Forum Pro • Posts: 10,647
Re: Broncolor Impact 41 --help, Benoit !

41 = 400 joules, 21 = 200 joules, sync voltage 8.8 V. Hope you don't mind, Benoit

-- hide signature --

cheers, Peter

Germany

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