S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

Started Nov 2, 2006 | Discussions
OP Paulsen Junior Member • Posts: 25
Re: Flash range....

Okay then. I assume you calculated thes from Fujis flash range
quotes. If that is the case what will be the theoretical range at
iso200 and iso400. ie.. what is the formula for flash range verses
iso?

The range doubles when you increase ISO by two full stops.

I have been wondering this for a while
thanks Darin

To learn things you would like to know, try your favourite search engine and Wikipedia :-).
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Paulsen

mhensche Regular Member • Posts: 195
Re: S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

Maybe I should do both? Let's see how my time will be spent.

I was hoping to have the english site done via a link to the forum, but as you say, you cannot edit and by that the page will be hard to read in the future.
--
Kind regards
Michael Hensche

Tianium Veteran Member • Posts: 4,280
Re: Flash range....

Paulsen wrote:

Okay then. I assume you calculated thes from Fujis flash range
quotes. If that is the case what will be the theoretical range at
iso200 and iso400. ie.. what is the formula for flash range verses
iso?

The range doubles when you increase ISO by two full stops.

Thanks

digraph Regular Member • Posts: 312
Re: S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

I really appreciate this thread. Thanks guys. Can someone comment on the following:

1) I'm confused if you're suggesting that for indoor people-pictures I use portrait mode or P S A or M mode?

2) What and where in the menus is "negative flash compensation?"

3) Do you guys ever use ISO 100? What are good situations for it?

Videoguy Senior Member • Posts: 2,671
Re: S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

digraph wrote:

I really appreciate this thread. Thanks guys. Can someone comment
on the following:

1) I'm confused if you're suggesting that for indoor
people-pictures I use portrait mode or P S A or M mode?

It depends. If you dont want to worry about setting your ISO manually, then portrait mode will handle the ISO for you. It is more conservate with the ISO than full auto mode, which is good. As stated already, it limits ISO to 800, and on flash shots,portrait mode will often use ISO400 where full auto mode would use ISO800 for the same shot. But if you were to use one of the other modes you mentioned, you might be able to take the shot at a manual ISO100 or ISO200, but you need to heed our warnings about flash range. Lower ISOs also mix in less ambient light. I suggest trying both methods out if you have any doubt.

2) What and where in the menus is "negative flash compensation?"

Shooting menu. It's flash compensation, and you can adjust up or down about 2/3ev. Just look where it says "flash" in the menu. Also, as I stated, read the manual and test the different settings. There is also a downloadable manual if you dont own the camera.

3) Do you guys ever use ISO 100? What are good situations for it?

Absolutely. It gives the absolute least possible noise on the camera. ISO200 is very close, and the camera will use it sometimes in auto mode even in very bright light. Manually, I'll use ISO100 in bright sunlight of course, but there are other times depending on the acceptable shutter speed, aperture, focal length, distance, etc whether ISO100 is the best option. When manually selecting ISO, it's really best to understand how all these factors correlate.

If you already own the camera, I recommend taking shots at some different ISOs and see what you think, make some prints, and see how it really affects things in your preferred output.

mhensche Regular Member • Posts: 195
Re: S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

digraph wrote:

I really appreciate this thread. Thanks guys. Can someone comment
on the following:

1) I'm confused if you're suggesting that for indoor
people-pictures I use portrait mode or P S A or M mode?

I've added some new pictures to my site meinekamera.00hensche.de where you can see the difference between indoor flash shots with ISO 100 which ist to be set manually by using one of the above modes and ISO 400 which may often be used by the camera itself in portrait mode.

You will well notice how the ambient light caught in ISO 400 pics is much more realistic for the evening mood with a lamp. The ISO 100 pic could have been made at any time of the day. On the other hand there is more noise in the ISO 400 shot, but as was mentioned before, its not bad at all.

3) Do you guys ever use ISO 100? What are good situations for it?

I also added some new bright daylight shots that were made at ISO 100. Another example with ISO 100 is the night shot of the building (last picture on the second side). You obviously have to use a tripod but light is caught via long term exposure and not with noisy highest ISO.

So there are lots of situations for ISO 100
--
Kind regards
Michael Hensche

mhensche Regular Member • Posts: 195
Re: S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

Sorry, I forgot to mention it's in the drawer "fotos".
--
Kind regards
Michael Hensche

mhensche Regular Member • Posts: 195
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

Paulsen wrote:

"In P mode, it appears that the minimum shutter speed is 1/45th sec when flash is enabled, and it goes up with a greater focal length."

Is that correct? I would belive shutter speed had to go down with greater focal length to let more light in because of the lense getting slower?

-- hide signature --

Kind regards
Michael Hensche

Videoguy Senior Member • Posts: 2,671
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

mhensche wrote:

Paulsen wrote:
"In P mode, it appears that the minimum shutter speed is 1/45th sec
when flash is enabled, and it goes up with a greater focal length."
Is that correct?

Yes, it's correct. However, you are quoting me, not Paulsen. It can be easily verified if you own the camera. Simply put the camera into P mode in an area where flash is required, make sure flash is on auto or forced, and zoom in. The shutter speed will increase as you increase focal length.

I would belive shutter speed had to go down with
greater focal length to let more light in because of the lense
getting slower?

Two things. First, to quote myself from the same post in which you just quoted:

"Since the actual flash duration is so short, a longer shutter duration doesn't help the light from the flash expose the shot, and is only good for mixing in ambient light, which can help on the overall exposure depending on the amount of ambient light & ISO setting"

To elaborate a bit more on that, when I say flash duration is "short", I'm talking sometimes being faster than 1/10,000th of a second. So using a slow shutter (slower than 1/45 sec for example) only allows additional ambient light to expose the CCD, and it doesn't help at all for the exposure of the flash itself.

Secondly, if the shutter speed were to get slower than 1/45th sec as your focal length increased, this would be a problem with blurring noticable due to ambient light exposure during this extended duration. So even when using flash, shutter speeds need to be fast enough, like the rule-of-thumb 1/focal-length speeds, to prevent ambient light from giving your shots a blurred look due to camera shake, as well as subject movement.

mhensche Regular Member • Posts: 195
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

Videoguy wrote:

Yes, it's correct. However, you are quoting me, not Paulsen.

I apologize for that, I was getting a little confused since I just finished sorting the different posts for a collecting them on my site.

I partially understood before, now I completely do, thanks again

I would like to add your explanation and hope, you have no complaints finding your tips on my site.
Paulsen already agreed, please let me know if you don't.

I find this thread too helpful to get lost sometime.

-- hide signature --

Kind regards
Michael Hensche

Sample pics, tips and tricks to S6x00fd on meinekamera.00hensche.de

Tianium Veteran Member • Posts: 4,280
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

mhensche wrote:

Paulsen wrote:
"In P mode, it appears that the minimum shutter speed is 1/45th sec
when flash is enabled, and it goes up with a greater focal length."

Is that correct? I would belive shutter speed had to go down with
greater focal length to let more light in because of the lense
getting slower?

All auto modes will do this. It is to help prevent camera shake. It will increase up to 1/125sec at full zoom.

You may find Antiblur mode uses higher defaults above about 3/4 zoom. The S5600 does...it increases to 1/300 at full zoom

Darin

Videoguy Senior Member • Posts: 2,671
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

mhensche wrote:

I partially understood before, now I completely do, thanks again

I would like to add your explanation and hope, you have no
complaints finding your tips on my site.
Paulsen already agreed, please let me know if you don't.

I find this thread too helpful to get lost sometime.

Sure, I have no complaints at all.

mhensche Regular Member • Posts: 195
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

Videoguy wrote:

Sure, I have no complaints at all.

Thank you, in the meantime I got german feedback of people not reading english fluently, they appreciate it.

So, thank you (all)

--
Kind regards
Michael Hensche

Sample pics, tips and tricks at meinekamera.00hensche.de

Videoguy Senior Member • Posts: 2,671
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

Tip - When using JPEG, you can reduce the effect of noise on high ISO shots by reducing the over-sharpening of the S6000/S6500 by setting it to "soft" in the menu. It appears this camera uses more agressive sharpening than the F30. By using soft, it also gives you more to work with when using PP, where you can have more control and be selective in what you sharpen. RAW does not do any sharpening in camera. This is discussed more in this thread:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1012&thread=20748551

Chris Regular Member • Posts: 118
Re: S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

Hey Paulsen:

Thanks for some of the great tips. Very helpful for me and my new sd6000

Chris

Rui Manuel Junior Member • Posts: 26
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

Videoguy wrote:

The Finepix software, s7raw, and Adobe Camera RAW
(ACR) all support S6000FD raw conversion (ACR doesn't support
S6500FD without hacking a file.)

This hack of the ACR file to make it support S6500fd:

Has anyone done it?
If yes, it worked ok?

Could you post here where to get such file, or post some instructions on how to do it?

Hope it isn't illegal or something against forum rules to ask for this. It's just that this would be extremely helpful for me to process raw files in Photoshop, until Adobe releases a ACR that supports S6500fd.
--
Rui

starlite2 Regular Member • Posts: 115
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

I recall reading somewhere that said the in-camera sharpening is set too high. Is it something adjustable to make it sharpen less?

mhensche Regular Member • Posts: 195
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks

You can set it to soft - normal - hard.
I put some examples here: http://meinekamera.00hensche.de/sharf/index.html
--
Kind regards
Michael Hensche

Pictures and tips to S6500fd on meinekamera.00hensche.de

clivef Junior Member • Posts: 40
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks (ACR with 6500)

Download XVI32 (a free hex-editor)
open the ACR 3.6 Plugin within XVI32 & search for 2 s6000fd entries
change these to s6500fd & save the modified file
then follow the adobe plug in instructions.

you can achieve much better quality images using ACR & applying third party noise reduction (I use noiseware) than with finepix studio (which tends to produce fractal artifacts)

Rui Manuel Junior Member • Posts: 26
Re: More S6000fd/S6500fd tips & tricks (ACR with 6500)

Thank you Sir! It worked!

Thanks also to Michael Hensche for all his help
--
Rui

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