different ac adaptor ?

Started Jul 4, 2006 | Discussions
Huyen Olson
Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,468
different ac adaptor ?

Hello all,

I need some advice to whether I should find an ac adaptor required for my FZ30 or can I use any brand as long as it has the required voltage (in this case is 8.4v ?

thanks

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Nikon D750 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
VPic Regular Member • Posts: 308
Re: different ac adaptor ?

Two more compatibilties.

Charging current, as long as it is not too far from original and right connectors.

Some have temp monitoring and other sensors too.

There are aftermarket chargers available from batteries marketers.
But dont just try to use any 9.4 volt charger.

VPic Regular Member • Posts: 308
Re: different ac adaptor ?

i mean 8.4v.

How do we edit thr posts....

genece Forum Pro • Posts: 15,439
Re: different ac adaptor ?

Many have reported using Walmart adapters.......but I believe a card reader is a much better investment than a AC adapter.
Unless you have some special need for an adapter ....I would not bother.
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Gene
From Western PA.

Panasonic FZ 20 and FZ30

D50 and lenses.

http://imageevent.com/grc6

Just trying to learn and it's slow going!

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ30 Nikon D50 Nikon D7000 Nikon D7100
linuxworks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,937
Re: different ac adaptor ?

closer to 7.2 v the better.

I would not recommend 8.4. fwiw.

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Huyen Olson
OP Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,468
Re: different ac adaptor ?

a card reader would only transfer pictures to the computer. I am looking for the ac dc adaptor so I don't have to use the battery so much when I am indoor. You just plug it into the electric outlet and that's it !

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Nikon D750 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
Huyen Olson
OP Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,468
Re: 7.2v ?

Thanks but 7.2v is for the li-ion battery, I have that. I was talking about the ac adaptor that you can just plug it into the house electric outlet. My camera FZ30 says I could use an ac with 8.4v adaptor if I didn't want to use the battery so much. Reason to my question was because I saw a couple of these adaptors on line under different brands and was wondering if it could be done by using an off brand unit as long as it meets the requirement.

thanks again.

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Nikon D750 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
linuxworks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,937
Re: 7.2v ?

Huyen Olson wrote:

Thanks but 7.2v is for the li-ion battery, I have that. I was
talking about the ac adaptor that you can just plug it into the
house electric outlet.

yes yes, I know.

see here:

http://netstuff.org/battery/graphs/

there's a reason I'm so sure about the 7v figure I graphed it out using a computer and a volt meter with computer control.

you can trust my numbers

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linuxworks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,937
Re: different ac adaptor ?

linuxworks wrote:

closer to 7.2 v the better.

I would not recommend 8.4. fwiw.

and the reason is that 8.4v only BURNS HEAT. which is not your friend

the dropoff voltage is about 6. 6 and a little bit. add some for fudge factor and you get close to 7.

amazing. 7.2v is what the battery is rated for! coincidence?

I have no idea where 8.4v comes from, but empirically, its WAY off. way off.

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Seemolf Senior Member • Posts: 1,243
Re: different ac adaptor ?

linuxworks wrote:

linuxworks wrote:

closer to 7.2 v the better.

I am using stabilized 7V for my FZ5, no problems! My external battery pack consists of 6 AA cells = 7.2V

http://www.geocities.com/seemolf/technique/TripsAndTicks.html

I have no idea where 8.4v comes from, but empirically, its WAY off.
way off.

As far as I know the additional voltage is needed to charge the internal battery. Please remove the internal battery, take stabilized 7.2V and be happy.

Sven

Cpilot Regular Member • Posts: 156
Re: different ac adaptor ?

We keep having this argument. A fully charged battery is 8.4V. This the way lithium-ion batteries work. I've measured it several times and there are several web sites which will confirm this. A half charged battery is around 7.5V. So, a regulated (note this word) supply somewhere between 7.2V and 8.4V will work. I use an 8.4V supply with no problems. Panasonic state this voltage on the camera and in the manual. Their own power supply also develops this voltage. However, treat it as a maximum.

Bryan

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He who laughs and runs away brings the bacon home to roost.

Cpilot Regular Member • Posts: 156
Addendum

All rechargeable batteries have a nominal voltage. That's the operative word, nominal. For instance, a fully charged 1.25V NiCad is around 1.42V and a fully charged 12V lead-acid car battery in new condition is 16.4V. Drops to about 15.2V after some use. Same with the Li-ion battery. 4.2V per cell fully charged down to around 3V when it needs charging. So it might say 7.2V on the FZ30 battery but it only gets to that voltage after some discharge.

Bryan

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He who laughs and runs away brings the bacon home to roost.

linuxworks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,937
Re: different ac adaptor ?

Seemolf wrote:

As far as I know the additional voltage is needed to charge the
internal battery. Please remove the internal battery, take
stabilized 7.2V and be happy.

the be happy part, yes

but I'm not sure that the external dc can charge the battery. its certainly not meant to, I don't think.

otoh, I do remember people saying that if you connected both, one -could- start to discharge the other. but I think that's due to leakage between the 2 supply inputs (dc external and battery cavity) and not really a direct connection.

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linuxworks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,937
Re: different ac adaptor ?

Cpilot wrote:

We keep having this argument. A fully charged battery is 8.4V. This
the way lithium-ion batteries work. I've measured it several times
and there are several web sites which will confirm this. A half
charged battery is around 7.5V. So, a regulated (note this word)
supply somewhere between 7.2V and 8.4V will work. I use an 8.4V
supply with no problems. Panasonic state this voltage on the camera
and in the manual. Their own power supply also develops this
voltage. However, treat it as a maximum.

that is PRECISELY my point - its a maximum.

surely you agree that in an ideal power supply and load, you want to give the MINIMUM needed but not much more, right? since any excess is burned off as heat.

the pany cams have a minor problem with blowing fuses. I suggest running the least amount of voltage a circuit can take and still operation RELIABLY.

I have found that by feeding just about 6v into the unit, it runs -reliably-.

7.2 for a fudge factor but its NOT needed! the internal dc-dc converters in the camera bring up 6v to the right internal voltage rails and so going MUCH over 6v is an exercise in wearing out the internal voltage regulators!

not sure what else I can say about this.

the stated input voltage is a MAX. if you want to create extra heat, more power to you! [grin].

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Seemolf Senior Member • Posts: 1,243
no heat burning

linuxworks wrote:

..

and the reason is that 8.4v only BURNS HEAT. which is not your
friend

Sorry Bryan,

there is no heat problem caused by the external power with the FZ5.

My regulated DC power supply shows a stable power consumption of 2W over the whole range - starting with 6V ending with 8.2 V.
The camera takes what it needs, the current is adapting to that.

Sven

Seemolf Senior Member • Posts: 1,243
Re: no heat burning

Seemolf wrote:

The camera takes what it needs, the current is adapting to that.

You talked about fuses - there is less stress for the fuses with higher voltages in this case. If these fuses control the incomming current!
8V 0,25A
6V 0,34A

Sven

linuxworks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,937
Re: no heat burning

Seemolf wrote:

linuxworks wrote:

..

and the reason is that 8.4v only BURNS HEAT. which is not your
friend

Sorry Bryan,

there is no heat problem caused by the external power with the FZ5.
My regulated DC power supply shows a stable power consumption of 2W
over the whole range - starting with 6V ending with 8.2 V.
The camera takes what it needs, the current is adapting to that.

that goes against all I understand about power regulation.

excess energy (voltage) beyond what a regulator needs IS burned off in heat. why do you say otherwise?

am I missing something here??

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Seemolf Senior Member • Posts: 1,243
Re: no heat burning

linuxworks wrote:

Seemolf wrote:

linuxworks wrote:

..

and the reason is that 8.4v only BURNS HEAT. which is not your
friend

Sorry Bryan,

there is no heat problem caused by the external power with the FZ5.
My regulated DC power supply shows a stable power consumption of 2W
over the whole range - starting with 6V ending with 8.2 V.
The camera takes what it needs, the current is adapting to that.

that goes against all I understand about power regulation.

excess energy (voltage) beyond what a regulator needs IS burned off
in heat. why do you say otherwise?

am I missing something here??

I am measuring ENERGY in WATT and not in Voltage, please correct me if I am wrong!
The power consumption (energy) is stable over the whole voltage range.
This means that the current is rising with lower voltages.

Where does your HEAT come from, if there is a stable power consumption of 2 WATTs ???
I guess Panasonic did not use a simple zener diode, just to burn heat!

Sven

Seemolf Senior Member • Posts: 1,243
Re: no heat burning

Seemolf wrote:

I am measuring ENERGY in WATT ..

Sorry, just to keep the right:

Energy: Watt/h
Power: Watt

linuxworks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,937
Re: no heat burning

I should try to repeat your experiment perhaps I will - because when I did my voltage tests, I did not put an ammeter in series (and I could have, too - damn! I have 2 rs232 meters and I could have logged both datasets in parallel. NOW you tell me this!)

the way I was visualizing this is that a voltage regulator in its simplest terms (ignoring if its linear or switching) takes an input voltage (if its a regulator, that implies the input is higher than the output) and produces an output voltage. the difference between them is the voltage loss.

I do admit I have much more experience with linear (simple 3-terminal regulators like the 340t series) than I do with switching, so maybe things are different for that. but as you increase the input voltage on a linear regulator (which has a fixed output voltage) that extra voltage IS burned up in heat. assuming the load is the same - that to the load side, it gets 5v (say) and 1amp max (say). as long as its drawing the same kind of load (the camera is consistent, for a given test) then as I raise the input voltage, the heat DOES rise.

that's the behavior I was trying to advise people against. you want to supply JUST enough over the minimum input requirements of a voltage regulator. adding more never helps and can only hurt. knowing that 'it works' at 6v and its quite stable at 7, it seems folly, to me, to run it to 8.4!

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