wide angle lens or stitch?

Started Jun 14, 2006 | Discussions
Roscolo Regular Member • Posts: 349
wide angle lens or stitch?

Looks like I will be buying a 350...really don't want to spend a wad on other cameras that don't offer that much more for what I do.

Question: I have a job to shoot some architecture at a bed & breakfast - interiors. Client wants digital. I have all the equip to shoot this on film (4x5 and medium format), but if I choose to shoot interiors with the 350, can I get a seamless professional result via shooting with a 17mm lens and stitching 2 shots together?

Or am I better off just buying a super wide lens (looking at Sigma 10-20)?

Thanks.

Febs Contributing Member • Posts: 512
Re: wide angle lens or stitch?

Hi, I've made some panoramic shots of interiors with the 350D and found it was a lot of fun. The results were pleasing plus the resolution of the resulting pictures were 15MP and up.

If you intend to shoot interiors rofessionally however I have to give you 2 warnings.

1. Stitching pictures together is a very laborious task. You only want to do that once in a while.

2. A stitched wide angle shot doesn't look the same like the shot of a 12mm WA lens. A 12mm will retain straight lines, a stitched panorama will only keep vertical lines straight, horizontal lines will be bent.

Have fun!

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Stevil Senior Member • Posts: 1,489
Re: wide angle lens or stitch?

That's true if you use a wide-angle lens, but if you use a fairly narrow angle of view (longer focal length), programs like Panorama Tools/PTAssembler will make perfect panos...

Febs wrote:

...a stitched panorama will only keep vertical lines straight, horizontal lines
will be bent.

Have fun!

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Isola Verde
Isola Verde Veteran Member • Posts: 9,458
Re: wide angle lens or stitch?

Roscolo wrote:

Looks like I will be buying a 350...really don't want to spend a
wad on other cameras that don't offer that much more for what I do.

Question: I have a job to shoot some architecture at a bed &
breakfast - interiors. Client wants digital. I have all the equip
to shoot this on film (4x5 and medium format), but if I choose to
shoot interiors with the 350, can I get a seamless professional
result via shooting with a 17mm lens and stitching 2 shots together?

Or am I better off just buying a super wide lens (looking at Sigma
10-20)?

Ah - so things have changed now, have they? Didn't you say, in this thread: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1021&message=17083517

"So far I've lost not a single client to the fact I'm still shooting film"

May I ask - from looking at a few of your posts, I wonder if you've ever used 35mm for your architectural work? Seems like there may be a private and long-running MF vs 35 debate buried away in some of your digital objections ?

Unless the client only wants a shot or two for their website, they're probably wrong to insist that you shoot on digital - as you could show them if you borrow a 350D and shoot with both that and your film equipment.

However, the way the world is, I'll bet their insistence on digital is related to their expectation of what to pay you - and that can be very hard to change!

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Max Lyons Regular Member • Posts: 246
Wide angle stitched images

Febs wrote:

2. A stitched wide angle shot doesn't look the same like the shot
of a 12mm WA lens. A 12mm will retain straight lines, a stitched
panorama will only keep vertical lines straight, horizontal lines
will be bent.

This is only true if you are using mediocre stitching software that doesn't allow you to specify the projection for the final image. Some software, such as my own PTAssembler ( http://www.tawbaware.com/ptasmblr.htm ), allows you to choose rectilinear projection for the final image, as opposed to the more common cylindrical projection typically found in most "beginner" programs. In fact, most other programs don't even make this choice available to the user...they are stuck with cylindrical projection and its curved line output.

Here's an image with a 111 degree field of view (approximately equal to the field of view produced by a 12mm lens on a 35mm camera) stitched using rectilinear projection. All straight lines in the scene (horizontal, veritcal and diagonal) are rendered as straight in the output image.

http://www.tawbaware.com/maxlyons/gigapixel2.htm

Max

http://www.tawbaware.com/maxlyons
http://www.tawbaware.com/ptasmblr.htm

Febs Contributing Member • Posts: 512
Re: Wide angle stitched images

Hello Max,

I haven't tried PTAssembler yet, but looking at your picture it seems to be a pretty sophisticated program. Thanks for telling.

Fabian

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OP Roscolo Regular Member • Posts: 349
Re: nothing has changed

Nope...nothing has changed. Still looking for a reasonably priced digital that will satisfy some of the needs of some of my clients.

For this client, for this job, neither of which are terribly critical (i.e., he won't mind converging lines and nor does he need the hi-res of large format) I'm thinking I can get an acceptable result with a DSLR and a super wide lens. So I have purchased a 350D and a Sigma 10-20 to shoot this job with. The establishment I purchased from knows my situation and I have the option to return the camera and / or the lens if they do not work well for me.

For other work I do for publication, a DSLR will not do the job, just as a film SLR would not do the job.

Regardless, I will probably keep the 350D, because I do have copywork jobs, business portraits and the like for which a borrowed small mp DSLR has proven effective. Whether or not I keep the Sigma 10-20 will depend upon whether it works out on this job or whether I not I like having it around to play with!

By the way, I just raised my day rate by 30% so that will replace any income lost from shooting film plus a bit more, and my post processing fees will still be in effect when I am working on a digital camera file just as they are when I am working on a scan from film. So, actually, the final bill for this client will be a bit higher than if I only shot film. When I invest in new equipment, I have to pass these costs on to the customer, just like I have to pass all the other costs of doing business on to the customer.

And while I appreciate your concern, I have been working with this client for over 5 years, and I don't think they will have any problems paying for my services whether I shoot digital or film.

OP Roscolo Regular Member • Posts: 349
Re: any more "real world" interior examples?

This is only true if you are using mediocre stitching software that
doesn't allow you to specify the projection for the final image.
Some software, such as my own PTAssembler
( http://www.tawbaware.com/ptasmblr.htm ), allows you to choose
rectilinear projection for the final image, as opposed to the more
common cylindrical projection typically found in most "beginner"
programs. In fact, most other programs don't even make this choice
available to the user...they are stuck with cylindrical projection
and its curved line output.

http://www.tawbaware.com/maxlyons
http://www.tawbaware.com/ptasmblr.htm

Thanks. I checked out your link and that is a great image, but it looks like alot of work and time.

Do you have any examples of more typical situations and interiors photographer would face, like a bedroom, bath or kitchen, done by stitching only 1-5 shots together? Not a pano, just a good wide view of the room.

Thanks for the helpful info. I'm looking into the software.

Max Lyons Regular Member • Posts: 246
Re: any more "real world" interior examples?

Roscolo wrote:

Do you have any examples of more typical situations and interiors
photographer would face, like a bedroom, bath or kitchen, done by
stitching only 1-5 shots together?

I've got a few interiors in my gallery of Washington, DC images:

http://www.tawbaware.com/maxlyons/cgi-bin/image.pl?gallery=0&showThumbnails=1

The only complex thing about the image I posted earler was the number of images. The same scene could have been created (albeit with much less detail) with many fewer images if those images were captured with a shorter focal length lens.

Not a pano, just a good wide view of the room.

As far as Panorama Tools/PTAssembler is concerned there isn't a distinction between a "pano" and a "wide view". Panorama Tools/PTAssembler stitches images together.

Max
http://www.tawbaware.com/maxlyons

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