FLW filter for digital SLR?

Started Jun 10, 2006 | Discussions
TigerLi Regular Member • Posts: 233
FLW filter for digital SLR?

In his book "Understanding Digital Photography", Bryan Peterson said he often used a FLW filter to add a magneta color cast to the photos when shooting cityscapes or landscapes at dawn or dusk. The effect was very nice.

As for digital camera users, do you still use a FLW filter when you try to create a warm color cast, or you simply switch your white balance to fluorescent? Which approach gives you a better result.

Regards,
Victor

azguy
azguy Veteran Member • Posts: 7,599
Re: FLW filter for digital SLR?

I don't add any filters to get certain effects at dawn or sunset, because you can do so much in post processing.

I have tried flourescent filters on film cameras in the past with disappointing results. One problem is that there are several types of flourescent bulbs, cool, daylight, warm, etc. When using digital I have tried setting the WB to flourescent, but have had better results creating a custom white balance.
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Chuck Steenburgh
Chuck Steenburgh Senior Member • Posts: 1,982
Re: FLW filter for digital SLR?

I've found that the fine-tuning adjustments for WB works just fine to apply a natural-looking "warm" cast to my photos. Set -1 or -2 with whatever white balance best fits the scene.

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Gabby498 Forum Member • Posts: 75
Re: FLW filter for digital SLR?

Tiger, Bryan is saying that he is adding a FLW filter to sunsets to give him a magenta colorcast, not to correct for fluorescent lighting or to warm the image. Of course, you can add an over all magenta cast in post processing and possibly in a landscape using only natural lighting they would produce identical or at least very similar images. However, in shooting a late evening image in an urban sitting where there is possibly a mixture of lighting, natural, mercury vapor, neon, tungsten and possibly fluorescent the effect might be entirely different from the effect produced by post processing. The image used to illustrate the comment that I saw is an urban sitting. Not trying to out guess Bryan but I would imagine the reason he adds the FLW filter is to make a distinctive image, to take it out of the run of the mill, boy have we seen that done a hundred times before, sunset shot, or sunset shot post processed. He sells a lot of books and articles by creatively doing things that are often considered wrong and unimaginable by most photographers. With film, I occasionally used black and white filters to add colorcasts but never the FLW. Now I can’t wait to give the FLW a try on digital in an urban situation.

Julia Borg Veteran Member • Posts: 7,280
you decide

daylight shot, is it green?

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Julia

OP TigerLi Regular Member • Posts: 233
Re: FLW filter for digital SLR?

Thank you for the responses. I intend to use a FLW for creative purposes, not for color correction because I use a digital camera Nikon D50 and shoot in RAW.

Julia Borg Veteran Member • Posts: 7,280
Re: FLW filter for digital SLR?

TigerLi wrote:

Thank you for the responses. I intend to use a FLW for creative
purposes,

color filter for creative purposes on a digital camera set for RAW output ?

No.

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Julia

Zane Paxton Veteran Member • Posts: 6,947
A word of caution

TigerLi wrote:

In his book "Understanding Digital Photography", Bryan Peterson
said he often used a FLW filter to add a magneta color cast to the
photos when shooting cityscapes or landscapes at dawn or dusk. The
effect was very nice.

In a general sense, colored filters aren't a great idea on a digital camera. The stronger the color, the more some the the RGB photosites are starved for light, which then produces noise....

Within Photoshop there are a host of virtual filters that can be used.

Personally, IMHO, your time is better spent learning Photoshop really well and Lab Color mode processing specifically to get the effects you are describing. Think in terms of finding great light and then processing it really well to achieve your artistic vision.

Hope that helps!

Cheers,

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kobeson Regular Member • Posts: 400
Re: A word of caution

I too read Bryan Peterson's comments about using an FLW filter for sunset shots, so I am still uncertain (after digging up this old thread) whether or not to try an FLW filter on my Digital camera.

Bryan's sunset shots, and a lot I have come across on the net seem to use the FLW filters, and it is a great effect.

Is the filter going to add anything to the shots that altering the WB on the camera would do? Or adding a magenta tinge during PP?

From what I can gather camera store's don't seem to stock the FLW filters much any more, I assume there is a reason for this.

Is there any point me buying that one filter I found in a local camera store for taking nice sunset shots?

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Cheers,
Daniel

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