Day to night - a mini tut for beginners on up

Started May 23, 2006 | Discussions
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(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 10,011
Day to night - a mini tut for beginners on up

These are steps to turn day to night and put lights in windows. I’m using Steve's picture here:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1006&thread=18520429&page=1

I will take very short steps so as not to lose people with relatively little experience in PS (this may be a bit tedious for more advanced users). Begin with this portion cropped out of Steve's pic.

Create a new layer (I'll name it "black night"), fill with solid black, leave blending mode as "normal," and reduce opacity to around 78%. Use your eye here. It should look pretty dark, about like this:

On top of that, create a new layer ("window 1") and change blend mode to hard light.
Here's what you should have in the layers palette:

Zoom in on the window to the right of the door. Using the polygonal lasso with no feathering, select the window.

Choose a round, soft brush (if you're not sure about the "soft" part, check your help files under Brushes). Note the settings underlined here. They're approximate but are a good place to start.

Choose a muted yellow color. Here's what I picked. Experiment with colors and don't use the same color for all windows.

Using horizontal strokes and working from the bottom, paint in the window so it is brighter at the bottom than at the top. Three to five strokes should do it. Here I let it fade out at the top so it would look like a lamp set low behind the window. You should get something like this. (Remember, I'm zoomed in close. That's why the image looks so choppy.)

While you're still on that hard light layer, one little refinement that is especially good for windows that show a lot of detail in an image. Use the eraser to knock out the muntins (the wooden sticks that separate the individual window panes). Set the eraser to 1 px, hard edge, 100% opacity. If you don't know this little trick with brushes, here's how to do it. Click at A and release. Move the eraser-brush to B, hold down SHIFT, and click again. This will erase along the dotted line from A to B. This works for all brushes -- painting, erasing, smudging, etc.

After you knock out all three muntins (two horizontal, one vertical), you should end up with something like this:

You can use this basic method to put lights in most windows. The settings I've used here are just approximations, what looked right to me on my monitor in my current mood. Experiment, experiment, experiment.

RayGuselli
RayGuselli Forum Pro • Posts: 14,462
May I be the first

to say many thanks Peano.

Just copied and pasted as a superb point of reference.

Great tutorial - very grateful.

Best wishes

Ray

 RayGuselli's gear list:RayGuselli's gear list
Nikon D300 Nikon D700 Nikon D750
cspringer Forum Pro • Posts: 19,632
Great info...thanks!...nt

Peano wrote:

These are steps to turn day to night and put lights in windows. I’m
using Steve's picture here:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1006&thread=18520429&page=1
I will take very short steps so as not to lose people with
relatively little experience in PS (this may be a bit tedious for
more advanced users). Begin with this portion cropped out of
Steve's pic.

Create a new layer (I'll name it "black night"), fill with solid
black, leave blending mode as "normal," and reduce opacity to
around 78%. Use your eye here. It should look pretty dark, about
like this:

On top of that, create a new layer ("window 1") and change blend
mode to hard light.
Here's what you should have in the layers palette:

Zoom in on the window to the right of the door. Using the polygonal
lasso with no feathering, select the window.

Choose a round, soft brush (if you're not sure about the "soft"
part, check your help files under Brushes). Note the settings
underlined here. They're approximate but are a good place to start.

Choose a muted yellow color. Here's what I picked. Experiment with
colors and don't use the same color for all windows.

Using horizontal strokes and working from the bottom, paint in the
window so it is brighter at the bottom than at the top. Three to
five strokes should do it. Here I let it fade out at the top so it
would look like a lamp set low behind the window. You should get
something like this. (Remember, I'm zoomed in close. That's why the
image looks so choppy.)

While you're still on that hard light layer, one little refinement
that is especially good for windows that show a lot of detail in an
image. Use the eraser to knock out the muntins (the wooden sticks
that separate the individual window panes). Set the eraser to 1 px,
hard edge, 100% opacity. If you don't know this little trick with
brushes, here's how to do it. Click at A and release. Move the
eraser-brush to B, hold down SHIFT, and click again. This will
erase along the dotted line from A to B. This works for all brushes
-- painting, erasing, smudging, etc.

After you knock out all three muntins (two horizontal, one
vertical), you should end up with something like this:

You can use this basic method to put lights in most windows. The
settings I've used here are just approximations, what looked right
to me on my monitor in my current mood. Experiment, experiment,
experiment.

GlobalTvlr
GlobalTvlr Senior Member • Posts: 2,325
Re: Day to night - a mini tut for beginners on up

Thanks, this is a keeper.
Best,
Chris

 GlobalTvlr's gear list:GlobalTvlr's gear list
Fujifilm FinePix S2 Pro Nikon D300 Nikon D700 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 17-35mm f/2.8D ED-IF Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D +5 more
SBriggs Contributing Member • Posts: 837
Re: Day to night - a mini tut for beginners on up

Thanks Peano.

I made a PDF of your tut and with your permission would like to make it available for download here.

-- hide signature --

Sam

Zorpie Senior Member • Posts: 2,836
Thanks for sharing.

Hello Peano,

Great tutorial - and a great effect. Thanks for taking the time to sit down and prepare the 'how to' description - I'll look forward to Part 2 !!

Regards,

Zorpie
--
pbase supporter

Shuk Regular Member • Posts: 274
Re: Day to night - a mini tut for beginners on up

Peano,

THANK YOU so much for this tutorial, you have made my day a lot happier!
It is very kind of you to share your time, expertise and efforts.
I deeply appreciate this, and I'm sure many others will too !

I've said it before and I'll say it again without hesitation -
You are an extremely kind, talented and gifted person.

Thanks again, I'm in debt to you.

I'll get to work on this now I know the right way.

Best Regards
Steve H.

(unknown member) OP Forum Pro • Posts: 10,011
Re: Day to night - a mini tut for beginners on up

SBriggs wrote:

Thanks Peano.

I made a PDF of your tut and with your permission would like to
make it available for download here.

-- hide signature --

Sam

Certainly. Help yourself.

Scott Deardorff Senior Member • Posts: 1,100
Re: Day to night - a mini tut for beginners on up

Thanks, Peano. As you know, I enjoyed your Cambridge day/night conversion. Good job of explaining this.

Scott

cspringer Forum Pro • Posts: 19,632
One suggestion

instead of a black layer at 78% make a Hue/Saturation Adjustment layer. You can darken the Lightness slider which will give the same effect as a black layer or you can click Colorize, make a dark blue or whatever you like and desaturate, darken. You also have the mask to bring back the buildings.

cspringer wrote:

Peano wrote:

These are steps to turn day to night and put lights in windows. I’m
using Steve's picture here:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1006&thread=18520429&page=1
I will take very short steps so as not to lose people with
relatively little experience in PS (this may be a bit tedious for
more advanced users). Begin with this portion cropped out of
Steve's pic.

Create a new layer (I'll name it "black night"), fill with solid
black, leave blending mode as "normal," and reduce opacity to
around 78%. Use your eye here. It should look pretty dark, about
like this:

On top of that, create a new layer ("window 1") and change blend
mode to hard light.
Here's what you should have in the layers palette:

Zoom in on the window to the right of the door. Using the polygonal
lasso with no feathering, select the window.

Choose a round, soft brush (if you're not sure about the "soft"
part, check your help files under Brushes). Note the settings
underlined here. They're approximate but are a good place to start.

Choose a muted yellow color. Here's what I picked. Experiment with
colors and don't use the same color for all windows.

Using horizontal strokes and working from the bottom, paint in the
window so it is brighter at the bottom than at the top. Three to
five strokes should do it. Here I let it fade out at the top so it
would look like a lamp set low behind the window. You should get
something like this. (Remember, I'm zoomed in close. That's why the
image looks so choppy.)

While you're still on that hard light layer, one little refinement
that is especially good for windows that show a lot of detail in an
image. Use the eraser to knock out the muntins (the wooden sticks
that separate the individual window panes). Set the eraser to 1 px,
hard edge, 100% opacity. If you don't know this little trick with
brushes, here's how to do it. Click at A and release. Move the
eraser-brush to B, hold down SHIFT, and click again. This will
erase along the dotted line from A to B. This works for all brushes
-- painting, erasing, smudging, etc.

After you knock out all three muntins (two horizontal, one
vertical), you should end up with something like this:

You can use this basic method to put lights in most windows. The
settings I've used here are just approximations, what looked right
to me on my monitor in my current mood. Experiment, experiment,
experiment.

(unknown member) OP Forum Pro • Posts: 10,011
Re: One suggestion

cspringer wrote:

instead of a black layer at 78% make a Hue/Saturation Adjustment
layer. You can darken the Lightness slider which will give the same
effect as a black layer or you can click Colorize, make a dark blue
or whatever you like and desaturate, darken. You also have the mask
to bring back the buildings.

Yep, that'll work. Good suggestion. The main thing is to have the "night" on its own layer so you can turn it off to search out details in the image, then turn it back on to see your lighting effects.

(unknown member) OP Forum Pro • Posts: 10,011
Re: One suggestion

Peano wrote:

cspringer wrote:

instead of a black layer at 78% make a Hue/Saturation Adjustment
layer. You can darken the Lightness slider which will give the same
effect as a black layer or you can click Colorize, make a dark blue
or whatever you like and desaturate, darken. You also have the mask
to bring back the buildings.

Yep, that'll work. Good suggestion. The main thing is to have the
"night" on its own layer so you can turn it off to search out
details in the image, then turn it back on to see your lighting
effects.

Another point worth noting. Whether you use a solid black layer or a hue/sat adjustment layer, you might not want the darkness to be uniform over the whole image.

For instance, in Steve's pic, I wanted the moonlight to show on some of the walls while others stay in shadow. To get that effect, I erased the black layer at low opacity where I wanted to lighten a bit. You can do the same thing on a hue/sat layer by painting on the mask with white at low opacity.

SBriggs Contributing Member • Posts: 837
Here's a link to the PDF file...
cspringer Forum Pro • Posts: 19,632
Re: One suggestion

I thought you had added a mask to the black layer vs. the eraser tool.
They can be addicting!

Peano wrote:

Peano wrote:

cspringer wrote:

instead of a black layer at 78% make a Hue/Saturation Adjustment
layer. You can darken the Lightness slider which will give the same
effect as a black layer or you can click Colorize, make a dark blue
or whatever you like and desaturate, darken. You also have the mask
to bring back the buildings.

Yep, that'll work. Good suggestion. The main thing is to have the
"night" on its own layer so you can turn it off to search out
details in the image, then turn it back on to see your lighting
effects.

Another point worth noting. Whether you use a solid black layer or
a hue/sat adjustment layer, you might not want the darkness to be
uniform over the whole image.

For instance, in Steve's pic, I wanted the moonlight to show on
some of the walls while others stay in shadow. To get that effect,
I erased the black layer at low opacity where I wanted to lighten a
bit. You can do the same thing on a hue/sat layer by painting on
the mask with white at low opacity.

(unknown member) OP Forum Pro • Posts: 10,011
Re: One suggestion

cspringer wrote:

I thought you had added a mask to the black layer vs. the eraser tool.
They can be addicting!

lol ... no, I just used the eraser, though I do have the layer mask addiction. I really like your idea of using a hue/sat adjustment layer instead of solid black. I filched this image from the Panasonic forum
( http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1033&message=16350725 )

to see how a blue hue would work on a snow scene. This would be a great way to make a Christmas card of a house in winter.

Kent C Forum Pro • Posts: 25,803
Thanks Peano, Sam....

To the archives with this one. Sam, I assume that the pdf will only be available for a certain time period, correct? Thanks.
--
Kent

http://www.pbase.com/kentc
For prior discussions on most questions:
http://porg.4t.com/KentC.html
or d/l 'archives' at:
http://www.atncentral.com

cspringer Forum Pro • Posts: 19,632
Re: One suggestion

looks good. There's a Ulead Particle plugin that has a snow filter you might want to check out.

Peano wrote:

cspringer wrote:

I thought you had added a mask to the black layer vs. the eraser tool.
They can be addicting!

lol ... no, I just used the eraser, though I do have the layer mask
addiction. I really like your idea of using a hue/sat adjustment
layer instead of solid black. I filched this image from the
Panasonic forum
( http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1033&message=16350725 )
to see how a blue hue would work on a snow scene. This would be a
great way to make a Christmas card of a house in winter.

Wilkev Veteran Member • Posts: 3,711
Yes, Thanks Peano and Sam (nt)
-- hide signature --

Regards,
Bill

chas3000 Regular Member • Posts: 241
Re: Day to night - a mini tut for beginners on up

Excellent!!
thanks for posting Peano and thanks for the pdf Sam!

woofw Contributing Member • Posts: 665
tnks guyz for all the imput you've given us
-- hide signature --

woofw

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