Printer Resolution 2400 x 1200 versus 300 dpi

Started Dec 10, 2001 | Discussions
Mike Erskine Forum Member • Posts: 89
Printer Resolution 2400 x 1200 versus 300 dpi

dpi = dots per inch

Some postings say that the 2400 x 1200 means 2400 dpi in the x axis and 1200 dpi in the y axis. However, I keep seeing much lower numbers for printers in this forum, say 300 dpi. How do I reconcile these numbers. Am I printing at 300 dpi, 1200 dpi, or 2400 dpi? Incidently, I have a HP Photosmart 1000.

Dumb questions, but I am determined to learn this resolution stuff for my printer, scanner, monitor, and camera (DC4800) so that I can calculate proper settings.

Thanks, --Mike E.

Flash (NH) Regular Member • Posts: 229
Re: Printer Resolution 2400 x 1200 versus 300 dpi

Eric M. Erskine wrote:

dpi = dots per inch

Some postings say that the 2400 x 1200 means 2400 dpi in the x axis
and 1200 dpi in the y axis. However, I keep seeing much lower
numbers for printers in this forum, say 300 dpi. How do I
reconcile these numbers. Am I printing at 300 dpi, 1200 dpi, or
2400 dpi? Incidently, I have a HP Photosmart 1000.

Dumb questions, but I am determined to learn this resolution stuff
for my printer, scanner, monitor, and camera (DC4800) so that I can
calculate proper settings.

Thanks,
--
Mike E.

============ Flash Here ===============

Mike - it is likely that the 300 dpi you have been reading about is actually an image with 300 pixels per inch (ppi). If this image is sent to a printer, it would represent a very high-resolution for any printer, as pixels per inch (ppi) and the dots per inch of the printer (dpi) are two different things entirely.

A pixel is composed of colors so it is not just a dot. It may take several dots from a printer to print and reproduce that one color pixel. The various colors are made by the printer placing Cyan, Magenta and Yellow dots, plus of course, Black dots next to each other, (not on top) as a mosaic. This gives the illusion of many different colors. Get a good strong magnifier and verify this by looking at an image that has been printed on a bubble-jet printer. You will see the tiny ink dots.

My description is here basic and may not make the afficionados happy. My effort is to help you a little to understand the difference between pixels in an image and dots on a printer.--== Flash from NH =

OP Mike Erskine Forum Member • Posts: 89
Re: Printer Resolution 2400 x 1200 versus 300 dpi

Flash wrote:

Eric M. Erskine wrote:

dpi = dots per inch

Some postings say that the 2400 x 1200 means 2400 dpi in the x axis
and 1200 dpi in the y axis. However, I keep seeing much lower
numbers for printers in this forum, say 300 dpi. How do I
reconcile these numbers. Am I printing at 300 dpi, 1200 dpi, or
2400 dpi? Incidently, I have a HP Photosmart 1000.

Dumb questions, but I am determined to learn this resolution stuff
for my printer, scanner, monitor, and camera (DC4800) so that I can
calculate proper settings.

Thanks,
--
Mike E.

============ Flash Here ===============
Mike - it is likely that the 300 dpi you have been reading about is
actually an image with 300 pixels per inch (ppi). If this image is
sent to a printer, it would represent a very high-resolution for
any printer, as pixels per inch (ppi) and the dots per inch of the
printer (dpi) are two different things entirely.

A pixel is composed of colors so it is not just a dot. It may take
several dots from a printer to print and reproduce that one color
pixel. The various colors are made by the printer placing Cyan,
Magenta and Yellow dots, plus of course, Black dots next to each
other, (not on top) as a mosaic. This gives the illusion of many
different colors. Get a good strong magnifier and verify this by
looking at an image that has been printed on a bubble-jet printer.
You will see the tiny ink dots.

My description is here basic and may not make the afficionados
happy. My effort is to help you a little to understand the
difference between pixels in an image and dots on a printer.
--
== Flash from NH =

Flash, your explanation was certainly "on point". The difference between dpi and ppi was the key that I never understood since I bought my first digital camera 6 mo ago. Thank you very much. Mike E.--Mike E.

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