F11 Optimal Settings

Started Feb 11, 2006 | Discussions
Nanwithzoom Forum Member • Posts: 51
F11 Optimal Settings

Can someone direct me to a link on the forum with all the optimal settings for the F 11?

Thanks in advance.

Nanwithzoom

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Life is Like a Piano, it's How You Play It!

Olympus c-750 ( Retired)
Fuji S 5100
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Lou Chen Junior Member • Posts: 43
Re: F11 Optimal Settings

Ditto -- I've been picking up bits and pieces here to work out with the new F11, but would be great to have a sticky thread here with the "best of" tips on using the F10/11.

Will91 Forum Member • Posts: 97
Re: F11 Optimal Settings

Try this link. I had it bookmarked. It WOULD be nice if we could have sticky threads here.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1012&message=16625948

jst4fun Regular Member • Posts: 231
Re: F11 Optimal Settings

Obviously optimal varies depending on how/where you use it, and what you need from it.

For me... I wanted simplicity with 3 good settings all quickly reachable on the mode dial.

I use...

SCN = Portrait, forced single flash or slow sync depending on preference, AUTO ISO
AUTO = AUTO, w/ auto non-redeye flash, and AUTO ISO

A/S/M = A, aperture set to 2.8, redeye flashl, ISO forced to 200 due to A or S modes when user has select AUTO ISO in the other mode dial positions.

A/S/M = S, shutter speed forced to 1/60 to enable sync with slave flash, flash set to force single non-redeye
A/S/M = M, no flash, set EV to -2/3

This lets me use the F11 in the following way... (note: 99% of my pictures are of people, usually my daughter running around)

Mode dial vs. usage...

AUTO = daytime, F11 does better job than F10 of ISO selection, only uses flash if needed.
SCN = BRIGHT daylight with strong shadows. forced flash fills in shadows.
nighttime indoors
A = Night time or indoors for 200 ISO with red-eye flash.

less often I use...
M = outdoors, no flash, avoid overexposure
S = use with slave flash
SCN = natural, to enable 1600 ISO for indoor shots without flash

hope that helps.

Nanwithzoom wrote:

Can someone direct me to a link on the forum with all the optimal
settings for the F 11?

Thanks in advance.

Nanwithzoom

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Life is Like a Piano, it's How You Play It!

Olympus c-750 ( Retired)
Fuji S 5100
Panasonic FZ5 (Occasional Use)
Sony T1 ( Hubby's)
Sony P200
Sony 717 (Retired)
Sony H1

Paul De Bra
Paul De Bra Forum Pro • Posts: 12,376
Here is what I do.

In low light, with or without flash, the M mode (perhaps with -1/3EV) works fine.

In good light you can take advantage of the optimimum of the lens by using A mode. The lens has a tendency to produce a purple haze around high-contrast areas, when used between f2.8 and f4. From f4 to f5.6 the lens is best (at the wide angle). At f8 you start getting diffraction so images then become less sharp. If it's very bright I try f5.6 and if it's not so good I use f4.

Regarding ISO, I often use manual ISO settings, 80 when possible, but 100 and 200 are still excellent and 400 is still very good. Auto ISO is not available in A mode, so that is out.

Nanwithzoom wrote:

Can someone direct me to a link on the forum with all the optimal
settings for the F 11?

Thanks in advance.

Nanwithzoom

-- hide signature --

Life is Like a Piano, it's How You Play It!

Olympus c-750 ( Retired)
Fuji S 5100
Panasonic FZ5 (Occasional Use)
Sony T1 ( Hubby's)
Sony P200
Sony 717 (Retired)
Sony H1

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Slowly learning to use the DRebel (only around 20.000 shots) and now also the Fuji F11.
Public pictures at http://wwwis.win.tue.nl/~debra/photos/

 Paul De Bra's gear list:Paul De Bra's gear list
Fujifilm FinePix F200EXR Olympus OM-D E-M5 Olympus E-M5 II Panasonic Lumix G 20mm F1.7 ASPH Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 +3 more
Mind Expansi0n Contributing Member • Posts: 542
Re: F11 Optimal Settings

I think of the best tips any F10/F11 user can receive is to use all of your control. Firstly, learn your cam's ISO tendencies... learn how useful 800-1600 are... understand the beauty of shooting at lower ISO's, understand that you hold a cam that at ISO 400 beats the heck out of most others in its class. Next, use your increased control on the F11... Ap and Shutter priority... these are valuable in keeping you off of F2.8 where needed, or ensuring that your shutter speed is at just the point where handholding works with exposing the shot properly. Whatever you do don't rely on Auto ISO to get the shots you want... learn your camera instead, and benefit yourself 100 fold. The old "catch a fish for a man/teach a man to fish" addage applies well here, you'll benefit yourself immensely by being willing to learn the in's and out's of your Fuji.

Lou Chen wrote:

Ditto -- I've been picking up bits and pieces here to work out with
the new F11, but would be great to have a sticky thread here with
the "best of" tips on using the F10/11.

Poochdp Senior Member • Posts: 2,667
Re: Here is what I do.

Paul De Bra wrote:

to f5.6 the lens is best (at the wide angle). At f8 you start
getting diffraction so images then become less sharp.

Paul, what part of this F11 F8 shot is not sharp to you, that F5 would have improved it?

http://www.pbase.com/poochdp/image/54811360

Paul De Bra
Paul De Bra Forum Pro • Posts: 12,376
Can't say in your image because it is resized.

Diffraction is unavoidable due to the law of physics. There is nothing Fuji can do to the lens to have it not show diffraction at f8. Because a dslr has a larger sensor diffraction becomes really visible only around f22, but in a camera with a smaller sensor f8 is already suboptimal.

I have once made test images with my F11 (but didn't keep them) to see where the lens is sharpest (for the wide angle). F4 to F5.6 were best. F2.8 is also very good but shows purple halos in high contrast areas that go away by f4. F8 is still more than good enough to look perfectly sharp when downsized to 50% or smaller, like in your image (even the "original" one on pbase), but at 100% you can clearly see the difference. It is still sharp enough to not worry about it, but it's definitely not optimal.

Poochdp wrote:

Paul De Bra wrote:

to f5.6 the lens is best (at the wide angle). At f8 you start
getting diffraction so images then become less sharp.

Paul, what part of this F11 F8 shot is not sharp to you, that F5
would have improved it?

http://www.pbase.com/poochdp/image/54811360

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Slowly learning to use the DRebel (only around 20.000 shots) and now also the Fuji F11.
Public pictures at http://wwwis.win.tue.nl/~debra/photos/

 Paul De Bra's gear list:Paul De Bra's gear list
Fujifilm FinePix F200EXR Olympus OM-D E-M5 Olympus E-M5 II Panasonic Lumix G 20mm F1.7 ASPH Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 +3 more
Poochdp Senior Member • Posts: 2,667
Re: Here is what I do.

Paul De Bra wrote:

but 100 and 200 are still excellent and 400 is still very good.
Auto ISO is not available in A mode, so that is out.

Nanwithzoom & Lou Chen:

Dont be afraid to use auto modes too on the F11 and dont be afraid of 800 & 1600 ISO pictures they can be very usefull. The F11 is very usefull throught its range.....It will never be a DSLR but a great compact.

ISO 800 F5 1/125

Here is a 1600 ISO F 2.8 1/80 image, lots of highlights but look at it overall and to the right side or the wall paper, very usefull still at 1600 ISO

Poochdp Senior Member • Posts: 2,667
Re: Here is what I do.

PS, provided your willing to do a little bit of post production, visa via Neat Image and photoshop or similar programs.

Mind Expansi0n Contributing Member • Posts: 542
Re: Here is what I do.

That should probably be included in your original post... post production is not photography, though it may be supplemented for camera-based imperfections.

Poochdp wrote:

PS, provided your willing to do a little bit of post production,
visa via Neat Image and photoshop or similar programs.

Jon Poli Junior Member • Posts: 35
So, Ansel Adams Didn't Do "Real" Photography?

In Ansel Adams: A Biography, Mary Street Alinder describes how Adams printed his famous Moonrise over Hernandez image. He'd spend the entire morning making test prints — dodging, burning, and (chemically) manipulating them until they met his exacting standards. It took him that long even though he kept meticulous notes. Then he'd spend the afternoon making prints.

I'm not a purist. If tweaking contrast, dynamic range, and sharpening are required to make an image look as how I remember seeing it, I fugure if it was OK for Ansel Adams, why not for me.

Now we can certainly manipulate beyond this to make non-realistic images, and they can still be beautiful, and even be art, but the line where it stops being photography isn't well defined anywhere.

Kim Letkeman
Kim Letkeman Forum Pro • Posts: 33,424
Re: Here is what I do.

Mind Expansi0n wrote:

That should probably be included in your original post... post
production is not photography, though it may be supplemented for
camera-based imperfections.

Of course post production is photography ... in fact it is where the rubber meets the road. No one can take a perfect shot every time, because often there is simply not enough time to capture the subject in the right pose and lighting. You must take your shot when it presents itself. And you need to expose to avoid ruining the shot, not for the best out of camera look -- because that can bring on blown highlights, even with a dSLR (although I grant that it is somewhat more difficult to ruin a dSLR shot.)

And even dSLRs take photos that barely pass muster straight from the camera where sharpness and contrast are concerned. That was amply demonstrated by the recent thread that someone referenced here (a day or two ago.)

Thus, the assertion that post processing is used to cover camera deficiencies has no credibility.

I have not seen you post any photos lately ... in fact I can't remember ever seeing your photos. Why not post some and show us how it's done? Assertions like you made above tend to have a lot more credibility when backed by examples.

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Poochdp Senior Member • Posts: 2,667
Re: So, Ansel Adams Didn't Do "Real" Photography?

Well said Jon................and then too, many cameras do a number of different post processing actions before you see the picture. One of the nice parts about the F11 is that it does a little less of this then others.

In my experience, if you do no post processing your leaving as much as 35% of image quality on the table unused for some images. (mabey more)
--
Gallery; http://www.pbase.com/poochdp

Lou Chen Junior Member • Posts: 43
No wars, guys

Oy, don't start scaring the newcomers away!

Jst4fun - kudos for providing a good starting point for settings and for what conditions they are appropriate. Exactly what I was looking for.

However, I thought that each mode (Auto/Natural/Manual) would be able to keep its own ISO setting. I would love to be able to leave it in a high ISO or in Auto for the natural mode and have a lower one for manual -- so I could quickly switch between them if I didn't have much time to set up the shot. Unfortunately, it seems that changing ISO in any single mode changes it also in the other modes. Any way around this?

The way I see it, the #1 reason I purchased the camera was to be able to avoid using the flash. However, because of the Auto ISO's tendency to go high, I'd like to start lower and work up. I then find myself leaving the Manual Mode in ISO 200 as a starting point. That way, if I suddenly needed to snap an indoor shot without flash, I could flip to SP/N and take it at a high ISO without going through the F menu. But, since it now seems that all modes stay in the designated ISO (even in the Auto mode, which doesn't seem to make sense), I no longer have this flexibility.

Awhile ago, someone suggested a good primer for understanding aperture and shutter priority. Although at the time, it came across as a curt response to the poster's simple beginner's question, I could definitely use some grounding. Any suggestions? I have a decent understanding of composition, but not the other aspects that the F11 lets me adjust.

Lou Chen Junior Member • Posts: 43
F10/11 Tips Thread
Poochdp Senior Member • Posts: 2,667
Re: No wars, guys

Have you checked out the Learn link in the upper left hand corner of this page?

Lou Chen Junior Member • Posts: 43
Learn link

I'll definitely start there, but would like something to actually be able to sit down and spend time with.

Poochdp Senior Member • Posts: 2,667
Re: Learn link

Ok, after that, if you havent alleady done it, read every word in the manual...............then I think its time to turn on the F10 and begin taking photographs, experimenting and noticing the effects the differnt settings cause.

When your in low light brace yourself, when its too low, find something to set the camera on and use the 2 second timer. When you have time always think about the shot your going to take, use the the things you just read to set the camera to accenuate the parts of the scene you want to empasize, as well as half way depressing the shuter realease to lock focus and exposer then recompose. When you come upon a scene that means alot to you, use the EV button to bracket the shot up 1 and down 1 or.......find something lighter and darker in your scene (close to the same focus point of what your accentuating and shoot two more shots this way as an alternative to EV bracketing. (if there is no alternative focus point, use EV for braketing)

Check back in 500 shot..........LOL.........seriously.

Poochdp Senior Member • Posts: 2,667
Re: Learn link

or the F11

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