5D images from India - the best yet

Started Nov 5, 2005 | Discussions
jrodrigo Junior Member • Posts: 25
Re: 5D images from India - the best yet

kdvsn wrote:

When you run Canon's RAW conversion software on a PC in batch mode,
does it give you a JPG that it the same as what the camera would
produce. If so, it seems like you could also run a batch file to
covert all your RAW files into JPG after the fact and save both the
JPG's and RAW files for posterity. Then you have best of both
worlds.
About RAW not being universal, Adobe has a free convertor to
convert RAW files from most currrent DSLR's into DGN format (though
I don't know if the supports the 5D yet). DGN might not be truly
universal either but it seems like its picking up traction.

You are right... but there is a space problem in that... With 13 Mpx, every RAW is 15 Mb and 4 Mb more for the JPG version.

In India I took almost 3.000 pictures. Only this it would be 60 Gb. Yes, it's true I deleted al least half of them... Anyway is too much information and I really don't see the advatage.

Also the process to convert to JPG is time...

Not justificated for me... Anyway most of my friends thinks different.

Cheers!

ar22 Forum Member • Posts: 62
this is really sad...

not the images, because they are wonderful. but the comments that have followed such a beautiful gallery.

i have had the oppurtunity to spend 4 months in india doing tsunami relief. and looking at these images, they are not all poor people, this is just how they are. just because we grow up in a country where 'clean faces' = non poverty doesn't mean that that's how it is everywhere else. you go to a third world country and you see life at it's fullest, the hardships, the joys, the excitement, the spiritual. these kids, their toys are not what their parents bought at the electronic store but their backyard and the streets playing jacks or tag and just being a kid. unfortunatly some of us who have not visited another culture don't realize that what might look as being poor actually isn't, it's their culture. for example, sleeping on the floor, comes from it's too hot to sleep on a bed with bedding, the cool tiles keep your body cool in tempretures that reach to be 110 ferehnhiet.
and there are many more cultural differences.

i was born in india and came to the states when i was 5. i have grown up here all my life and only know the american way. i have been fortunate enough to be able to go back to india to visit every few years. and what i have learned most is that they, the people of india, are not the poor ones, we are. they have such an understanding of life and are content. they don't look at being the misfortunate, they look at what they do have. we here are never satisfied, and are constantly wanting more, and more, and more.

this is my two cents. for anyone who was disturbed by these photos, i feel very sorry for you because these images capture part of a country that you want to be ignorant to.

jrodrigo Junior Member • Posts: 25
Re: 5D vs 20D... any difference?

Mr Rodrigo,
Great to hear your explanation in person, for an enlightenment on
your approach, and ethics of your work... it should stop a lot of
speculative posts here, especially those related how you shouldn't
taken those photos... and many things that are completely out of
line.
I'm first and foremost an artists in my life, and equipment is
always secondary, but we certainly come here to be educated about
equipment as well, which should eventually help us to make wise
decision what to buy next. If camera didn't matter at all, we would
be all shooting cheap, tiny p & s, and pretend it doesn't matter.
There were several posts here that were adamant that camera didn't
matter at all, that you could have taken same quality shots with
Rebel or 20D. And I'm sure you would be able to make nice shots
with those cameras too. But I'm sure there was a good reason in
your mind why you got 5D on this trip rather than 20D.
But this is your work, and it would be good to hear how much do you
think 5D was a part of the process? Is FF the ONLY advantage of 5D
in your experience? Does 5D produce smoother images, more film-like
with better dynamic range than 20D or Rebel, as some users attest?
Do you think you would have achieved the same results with Rebel of
20D, or you feel there is a definitive and important positive
difference in using 5D?
There are many of us who would love to hear your answer on this topic.

I agree with you. I would admire somebody buying a 20D despite a 5D and donating the price difference to poverty.

Returning to photography that is the subject who all of us probably love and the reason we are here:

I have just wrtitten some impressions about 5D vs 20D in other post.

I have test dynamic range and I haven't seen noticiable differences. ¿smoother images, more film-like? Definitively not. If exists differences are so little and would disapper with the PS process.

I could have same results with 20D. You will not notice any difference in the web format... But I would need for a comfortable DOF using: 24 f1.4L, 50 f1.4, 85 F1.2L... and at least also a 16-35 f2.8L for wide shots.

Probably I would lose many pictures changing lenses.

With the 5D I could take all the pictures with a 24-70 f2.8L and a 135 f2L. DOF at f2.8 is enough... f2.8 with a 20D is too close.

Also big viewer makes everything more "pleasure"

With Rebel would also be exactly the same but a little bit noisy (everything above ISO 400). Anyway when you have tried 20D or 5D you feel very uncomfortable with Rebel construction.

Obiously it's only an opinion.

Cheers!

jrodrigo Junior Member • Posts: 25
See all galleries (not only poverty)

ar22 wrote:

not the images, because they are wonderful. but the comments that
have followed such a beautiful gallery.
i have had the oppurtunity to spend 4 months in india doing tsunami
relief. and looking at these images, they are not all poor people,
this is just how they are. just because we grow up in a country
where 'clean faces' = non poverty doesn't mean that that's how it
is everywhere else. you go to a third world country and you see
life at it's fullest, the hardships, the joys, the excitement, the
spiritual. these kids, their toys are not what their parents
bought at the electronic store but their backyard and the streets
playing jacks or tag and just being a kid. unfortunatly some of us
who have not visited another culture don't realize that what might
look as being poor actually isn't, it's their culture. for
example, sleeping on the floor, comes from it's too hot to sleep on
a bed with bedding, the cool tiles keep your body cool in
tempretures that reach to be 110 ferehnhiet.
and there are many more cultural differences.
i was born in india and came to the states when i was 5. i have
grown up here all my life and only know the american way. i have
been fortunate enough to be able to go back to india to visit every
few years. and what i have learned most is that they, the people
of india, are not the poor ones, we are. they have such an
understanding of life and are content. they don't look at being the
misfortunate, they look at what they do have. we here are never
satisfied, and are constantly wanting more, and more, and more.
this is my two cents. for anyone who was disturbed by these
photos, i feel very sorry for you because these images capture part
of a country that you want to be ignorant to.

Perhaps it was some confusion about my photos because I didn't published them. So, no explanations have been given (until today, if you read my posts)

Initial gallery published is only a parcial view of my feelings in India. Complete gallery is in:

http://www.juanrodrigo.com/india

Cheers!

Petteri Sulonen Forum Pro • Posts: 24,585
What really boggles my mind, is...

...how did you manage to shoot such a body of fantastic work in the extremely short time since the 5D came out? These are really, really good, and it would take most hardened pros I know way longer than that to put together a portfolio of this caliber. You're good . Damn!

Petteri
--
My flickr page: [ http://www.flickr.com/photos/primejunta/ ]
Me on photography: [ http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/ ]
Me on politics: [ http://p-on-p.blogspot.com/ ]

 Petteri Sulonen's gear list:Petteri Sulonen's gear list
Fujifilm X100S
kdvsn Regular Member • Posts: 311
Re: 5D images from India - the best yet

jrodrigo wrote:

You are right... but there is a space problem in that... With 13
Mpx, every RAW is 15 Mb and 4 Mb more for the JPG version.

In India I took almost 3.000 pictures. Only this it would be 60 Gb.
Yes, it's true I deleted al least half of them... Anyway is too
much information and I really don't see the advatage.

Also the process to convert to JPG is time...

Not justificated for me... Anyway most of my friends thinks different.

Cheers!

I might think about it differently too if I was to be shooting 3000 images over a relatively short period of time. I shoot a lot more frame now than I used to, but nothing like that much. I remeber on my first trip to India (in 1992) I shot about 5 rolls of 35mm film and I thought that I was shooting pretty much. Times do change.

http://kerrydavison.freeservers.com/

Jeff Laitila Contributing Member • Posts: 646
It's the Photographer, NOT the camera

As much as I can understand people wanting to know the exact equipment, settings, and post processing done to get results as great as this, please don't forget the most important factor... A highly skilled Photographer. (Having a great location always helps too.. ^ ^)

Having good gear will always make getting a great shots easier, but that gear is nothing more than a paperweight until it is picked up by someone who knows how to use it.

-- hide signature --

When I post images to the web I usually post some EXIF data as well, to preclude getting emails on what settings I used to get certain images, but in person I have just started to tell people, "I don't remember" when they ask me what camera, lens, or settings I used.

There is no magic formula. Just work long and hard enough to develop a style that is unique to you and your photos will stand out from the crowd.

Someone complimenting you based on what camera or lens you used is somewhat analogous to commenting on what great pots and pans a person used to cook a fabulous meal.

You always hear people say, "Wow, you must have a really nice camera!", But you never hear someone say, "Wow, you must have some really nice pots and pans!"

The Photographer is key, the gear is secondary.

Having said that, jrodigo has shown us what great results you can get when you mix together the right gear, the right location, and the right photographer.

Just my 2 Yens worth...

Now let's all go out and capture some light of our own! ^ ^

--
Jeff Laitila http://www.sushicam.com

olhovivo Senior Member • Posts: 1,258
Have you visited India?

It's photographers Meca... And I'm sure you'd make an interesting body of work since you agree that telephoto is for cowards. ;^)
--
Cheers,
Ric

pcmur Regular Member • Posts: 235
Bravo!

You are a master of the ART of photography. Thank you for making your cameras sing originally enough to break glass! Carol

Petteri Sulonen Forum Pro • Posts: 24,585
Lived a year in Nepal...

...but I was a teenager then.

As to the telephoto, anyone who's as good as this guy can shoot whatever he likes for all I'm concerned. (Also, although 135 on FF is technically a telephoto, it wasn't really what I had in mind when writing that article -- it's not far from 90, which is still a very useful length for street shooting.)

Petteri
--
My flickr page: [ http://www.flickr.com/photos/primejunta/ ]
Me on photography: [ http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/ ]
Me on politics: [ http://p-on-p.blogspot.com/ ]

 Petteri Sulonen's gear list:Petteri Sulonen's gear list
Fujifilm X100S
olhovivo Senior Member • Posts: 1,258
Re: Lived a year in Nepal...

I know that, was only joking... Though I think his images would benefit if he wore to shoot closer - it'd add more intimacy and less perspective compression.

I also tend to dislike images of poor and diseased as easier to depict misery because it plays with your feelings - not so much nowadays, with all the misery photographers around the world - and moves aesthetics to a lesser plane. And it's not easy to show these people with their dignity intact (bla, bla, I know)
--
Cheers,
Ric

treemed Forum Member • Posts: 56
Re: 5D vs 20D... any difference?

thanks! your opinion definitelly has weight, as i have not used 5D yet. i'm still inclined to try it as I always loved FF more than crop.

Regarding lenses, it would be interesting to know if you had any chance to try new 24-105.

Probably I would lose many pictures changing lenses.

With the 5D I could take all the pictures with a 24-70 f2.8L and a
135 f2L. DOF at f2.8 is enough... f2.8 with a 20D is too close.

Also big viewer makes everything more "pleasure"

With Rebel would also be exactly the same but a little bit noisy
(everything above ISO 400). Anyway when you have tried 20D or 5D
you feel very uncomfortable with Rebel construction.

Obiously it's only an opinion.

Cheers!

Petteri Sulonen Forum Pro • Posts: 24,585
Re: Lived a year in Nepal...

olhovivo wrote:

I know that, was only joking... Though I think his images would
benefit if he wore to shoot closer - it'd add more intimacy and
less perspective compression.

He had a quite a few shot around 30 mm too.

These remind me of Salgado's or even Serrano's work. They're not street situationals; they're street portraits. The 135 looks just about right for that from where I'm at.

I also tend to dislike images of poor and diseased as easier to
depict misery because it plays with your feelings - not so much
nowadays, with all the misery photographers around the world - and
moves aesthetics to a lesser plane. And it's not easy to show these
people with their dignity intact (bla, bla, I know)

And I think he succeeded remarkably well. I don't see these as the least bit exploitative or condescending.

Petteri
--
My flickr page: [ http://www.flickr.com/photos/primejunta/ ]
Me on photography: [ http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/ ]
Me on politics: [ http://p-on-p.blogspot.com/ ]

 Petteri Sulonen's gear list:Petteri Sulonen's gear list
Fujifilm X100S
Juli Valley Forum Pro • Posts: 54,437
Those fantastic but painful to view.

I had hoped for colorful costumes. Life is so grim there in the poor areas. It's so sad.
--
Juli
http://www.pbase.com/julivalley/galleries
Canon 2oD, Canon Gee3, and Canon S7o.

I keep trying to find an artist's eye in the B & H catalog

Juli Valley Forum Pro • Posts: 54,437
I later looked at some of your other Indian collections.

Your work is amazing.
--
Juli
http://www.pbase.com/julivalley/galleries
Canon 2oD, Canon Gee3, and Canon S7o.

I keep trying to find an artist's eye in the B & H catalog

Ian S Senior Member • Posts: 2,257
Hard, but Not grim

I made this comment earlier but I'll repeat it.

The B&W gallery creates an illusion of grimness that is more extensive than the reality. Many of the people in the images are not miserable although some are. Even the poorest people in India still find joy and laughter.

Also - I do not think that Juan will be offended when I say it is not valid to compare this work with that of Nachtwey as some have done. It is a matter of form versus substance. Nachtwey spends weeks and months plumbing the depths of real human misery, at real emotional cost to himself.

These are good photos, but good images and a good B&W conversion are not enough to make in-depth journalism.

Juli Valley wrote:

I had hoped for colorful costumes. Life is so grim there in the
poor areas. It's so sad.
--
Juli
http://www.pbase.com/julivalley/galleries
Canon 2oD, Canon Gee3, and Canon S7o.

I keep trying to find an artist's eye in the B & H catalog

-- hide signature --

Ian S
'To see a World in a grain of sand
And Heaven in a wild flower
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour'
http://www.rainpalm.com
http://www.mekongpicturehouse.com

Nathan A Luna Contributing Member • Posts: 564
But...

spartanic wrote:
When in the

hands of someone who knows their stuff, powerful images are
produced.

Doesn't that apply to all cameras, not just the 5d? Just a thought...

-- hide signature --

Learning. Day by day. How exciting.

_Sala_ Regular Member • Posts: 215
Your photos are wonderful.

Your shots are not at all exploitative as some others in this thread suggest. Rather, I see compassion and love in your photos.

I long to go to India (the closest I've ever been is Nepal).

scubashooter Regular Member • Posts: 227
You have succeeded as a great photographer+

Your pictures have evoked emotions and thought, as you can see from the reactions. The gearheads, artists and professionals are all commenting, that is true art. Wonderful work!
--
The oceans are life to the planet. Help protect them!
Canon One Dee Mark 2/Nikon Dee 2 X

j4y4 Regular Member • Posts: 152
Not because of the camera

but the man who's behind the camera. Even with 300D he can make the same pics those pics.

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