Death Do Us Not Part

Started Apr 19, 2005 | Discussions
marlof Senior Member • Posts: 1,038
Death Do Us Not Part

In the city cemetary of Roermond, a grave can be found that gives special meaning to the words "til death do us part".

The grave you see on the left is of "jonkvrouwe J.C.P.H. van Aefferden", of Dutch nobility. She had the Roman Catholic religion, but when she was about 21, she fell in love with a man eleven years older than she was, Colonel J.W.C. van Gorcum, who was not of noble upbringing had the Protestant religion. To make things worse: the colonel worked for the army of The Netherlands that had in 1839 repossessed the province of Limburg. Needless to say: their love and marriage (in 1842) caused a bit of an uproar. In spite of all this, their marriage lasted for 40 years, ending in the death of Colonel Van Gorcum. Since he was of the protestant religion he had to be buried in the protestant part of the city cemetary, which is on the opposite side of the wall. When his wife died 8 years later, upon her request she was not buried in her family grave, but out of line next to the wall dividing the catholic and protestant parts of the cemetary, where from her grave rose a hand, reaching the hand of Colonel Van Gorcum. Death Did Not Part Them.

Higgmeister Contributing Member • Posts: 811
A wonderful story - Thanks n/t
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Manfred Lai
Manfred Lai Contributing Member • Posts: 926
Re: Death Do Us Not Part

marlof wrote:

In the city cemetary of Roermond, a grave can be found that gives
special meaning to the words "til death do us part".

The grave you see on the left is of "jonkvrouwe J.C.P.H. van
Aefferden", of Dutch nobility. She had the Roman Catholic religion,
but when she was about 21, she fell in love with a man eleven years
older than she was, Colonel J.W.C. van Gorcum, who was not of noble
upbringing had the Protestant religion. To make things worse: the
colonel worked for the army of The Netherlands that had in 1839
repossessed the province of Limburg. Needless to say: their love
and marriage (in 1842) caused a bit of an uproar. In spite of all
this, their marriage lasted for 40 years, ending in the death of
Colonel Van Gorcum. Since he was of the protestant religion he had
to be buried in the protestant part of the city cemetary, which is
on the opposite side of the wall. When his wife died 8 years later,
upon her request she was not buried in her family grave, but out of
line next to the wall dividing the catholic and protestant parts of
the cemetary, where from her grave rose a hand, reaching the hand
of Colonel Van Gorcum. Death Did Not Part Them.

What a lovely story, a lesson which we should all emulate in our lives. Integrity is sorely lacking these days. Love is never old-fashioned.

Manfred

busch
busch Forum Pro • Posts: 32,370
Good story and picture!

Lots to learn from this......

Thanks for sharing.

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Busch

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Yuri Pautov
Yuri Pautov Forum Pro • Posts: 11,501
*marlof

Spasibo for such a touching story and wonderful photo!
Yuri
http://pautov.viplast.ru

Phororhacos Senior Member • Posts: 1,401
Re: Death Do Us Not Part

Hello Marlof.I just downloaded your photo with the remarkable tombstone.A great story behind it too,things like these show us that we really don't learn much by the course of history.
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Yehuda Katz Forum Pro • Posts: 25,916
What a moving story and photo!

marlof wrote:

In the city cemetary of Roermond, a grave can be found that gives
special meaning to the words "til death do us part".

The grave you see on the left is of "jonkvrouwe J.C.P.H. van
Aefferden", of Dutch nobility. She had the Roman Catholic religion,
but when she was about 21, she fell in love with a man eleven years
older than she was, Colonel J.W.C. van Gorcum, who was not of noble
upbringing had the Protestant religion. To make things worse: the
colonel worked for the army of The Netherlands that had in 1839
repossessed the province of Limburg. Needless to say: their love
and marriage (in 1842) caused a bit of an uproar. In spite of all
this, their marriage lasted for 40 years, ending in the death of
Colonel Van Gorcum. Since he was of the protestant religion he had
to be buried in the protestant part of the city cemetary, which is
on the opposite side of the wall. When his wife died 8 years later,
upon her request she was not buried in her family grave, but out of
line next to the wall dividing the catholic and protestant parts of
the cemetary, where from her grave rose a hand, reaching the hand
of Colonel Van Gorcum. Death Did Not Part Them.

Maple Leaf Veteran Member • Posts: 6,795
Re: Death Do Us Not Part

Wow! Great historical story. Just goes to show you that even religious indifferences can't part true love...not even in death.
--
Bob

jrdu Forum Pro • Posts: 21,371
Thought provoking

Interesting solution to their problem. Sometimes the operators of the graveyards would not be so accommodating. Great find and pic.
John

JerryCurtis Veteran Member • Posts: 9,017
A wonderful little bit...

of photo journalism. Sure beats all the negativity we see in the media's version of photo journalism.
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catspaws Regular Member • Posts: 288
Interesting story...

Nice capture. I am often surprised at the quality of art found in cemerties. In a way, I wish the stone cutters had signed these things. The person who carved those two embracing hands was an artist. Knowing the story behind this give a real depth to your picture. Thanks for sharing.

Jill
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CKirk Senior Member • Posts: 1,236
Howdy Marlof

Howdy Marlof,

What a powerful and wonderful image, and the story is so neat. Thanks so much for sharing this touching and wonderful story and image.

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Take care,

Craig

Burleson, Texas

Peter Dumont Veteran Member • Posts: 9,135
Hello Marloff

symbolic !
Nice story and picture .

Thanks for sharing

Bye,
Peter Dumont

Don't forget the queens birthdayparty in Amsterdam !
(30th of april )

West of Cary Senior Member • Posts: 1,200
Very interesting, and a touch macabre...

Thanks very much for the post.
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West

Quality is a word beginning with a Q, and ending with a Y

zazoo1994 Senior Member • Posts: 2,181
Great story and nice pic. (nt)

No text....

brokenz Veteran Member • Posts: 9,098
Re: Death Do Us Not Part

Wow! Great story and great picture to go along with it. I'm showing this one to my GF, friends at work, ect. I think this will be only the second time I've ever done that with something I've seen at DPReview!
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OP marlof Senior Member • Posts: 1,038
Thanks higgmeister! n/t

Higgmeister wrote:

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A picture is but words to the eyes.
Comments are always welcome.

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OP marlof Senior Member • Posts: 1,038
old-fashioned rocks.

Manfred Lai wrote:

What a lovely story, a lesson which we should all emulate in our
lives. Integrity is sorely lacking these days. Love is never
old-fashioned.

I like to think it is. But never out of fashion, so much is true.

OP marlof Senior Member • Posts: 1,038
History is a good teacher.

busch wrote:

Lots to learn from this......

Indeed, and that's why I went looking for the grave when I learned this story. Thanks for your nice comments.

OP marlof Senior Member • Posts: 1,038
Yuri: thanks! n/t

Yuri Pautov wrote:

Spasibo for such a touching story and wonderful photo!
Yuri
http://pautov.viplast.ru

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