My first impressions - and some info...

Started Jul 28, 2001 | Discussions
Wayne DeWitt Senior Member • Posts: 1,259
My first impressions - and some info...

Well, I finally got my camera today. I only had to call FEDEX half a dozen times and then go into my neighbor's garage to find it! That and a stray cay chewing on my arm has been the highlight of my day. Now my impressions:

1. Lightweight plastic-feeling comments: sorry don't agree. This camera is tiny, it's about 2/3 the size that I expected. Lesser mass equals lower weight, it feels perfect. I don't have a problem with anything feeling "cheap" about the camera. The two plug-in jack covers at the back could have been better-done. And the 4-way toggle protrudes a little further than necessary, feels a little loose, will probably last forever.

2. Tripod socket misplaced: agree - but. The proper place for the socket would have had it in the middle of the batteries - it's a compromise that I can live with.

3. Poor balance: disagree. Yes it is a LOT heavier on the left where everyhing is located. But have any of you handled a medium format camera with an L-grip? The proper way to use a camera is to cradle it in the left hand and only use the right for steadying, firing and film advance (where is that lever?). This camera feels perfect in my hands - as far as balance is concerned.

4. Plasticy-handgrip: agree. They really should have spent an extra dollar and used a better covering material. On the other hand the size is perfect for me (I never did become accustomed to the new grossly-oversized 35mm grips).

5. Heat: yes the grip does get warm. Haven't really shot with it yet - don't know if it will irritate me or not.

6. EVF: Love it! I wear glasses (-2.25 and -2.75) and can see the whole screen, the edges appear o.k., haven't had time to look for blurring. It does blackout during extreme changes of illumination. I found that the switch to B&W approximates the light level where the rods takeover for the cones in my own vision. In a darkened room (before my eyes accomodate) I can see more through the finder than with my normal vision (just a little more - this isn't a night vision device). As far as refresh rate - not a problem for me.

7. Stiff zoom: sorry, it feels ideal to me. It's moving several lens groups on cams within the lens, tighter can mean tighter tolerances inside. I never liked sloppy zooms.

I haven't had time to play yet - as I said it was an adventure just finding the camera (3 hours and half a dozen neighbors houses - and none of them admit to owning the damn cat that mauled me).

Some answers to questions others have asked and some other info:

1. Mine came with a Minolta USA warranty - I don't know WHAT the rest of you got.

2. The video out does not recognize camera orientation - do a vertical and you need to lay the t.v. on it's side to see it - major bummer to me. If you include this feature why not do it right?

3. Macro. The camera has a minimum horizontal field width at the macro 200mm setting of 2". Add a +3.8 diopter (Minolta #2) and this becomes 1.2". Add a +10 diopter (Hoya) instead, and you're around 0.85". The guy who wants to do jewelry - get a Minolta #2 and a ring will fill the entire field of view. Reversed Nikon 50mm enlarging lens vignettes very badly (damn!) you're down to a field width of about 0.3" but only half the sensor is covered. My reversed 50mm camera lens covers almost the entire field (about 75%) and the width is about 0.6" - the 24 vignettes very badly. The best bet for me is to limit use to the regular diopters.

4. The lens feels nice and tight. It extends a great distance (relative to it's size) during zooming, but never gets wobbly like the newer 1:1 macro lenses for 35mm. This is good, since locking on the bayonet lenshood requires a bit of force. The heavy 35mm lenses attached during the macro tests didn't seem to stress the lens at all - but I don't advocate attaching anything that heavy (8-9 oz.) onto the end of this lens.

My one gripe so far having to do with the ergonomics is that during manual focussing my fingertips contact those of the hand wrapped around the grip - this is a small camera and the clearances will take some getting used to. Also, when I dropped the batteries into their holes they almost jumped back out - they installed some hefty springs in there!

I may have a theory about the autofocus problem at 200mm - camera shake! While I was playing around I noticed one or two times when the lens racked itself in and out before locking, I also noticed that I was offbalance and shaking. It is a 200mm equivalent - shooter steadiness will have an impact on the autofocus being able to lock on. When I braced myself it locked on a lot quicker.

My overall opinion: This camera is just plain NEAT!

Now I've got to sit down and read the manual (has about 2-3 pages of warnings before you get to any information!) tonight. Starting tomorrow I'll probably be gone for a few days (maybe weeks?) while I play. Hope you guys have fun with yours also.

Wayne

 Wayne DeWitt's gear list:Wayne DeWitt's gear list
Minolta DiMAGE 7 Nikon Coolpix P510 Nikon Coolpix P7800 Kodak DCS Pro 14n Nikon D70 +2 more
David Roberts Regular Member • Posts: 240
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

Wayne wrote:

Well, I finally got my camera today. I only had to call FEDEX half
a dozen times and then go into my neighbor's garage to find it!
That and a stray cay chewing on my arm has been the highlight of my
day. Now my impressions:

Congratulations Wayne. I guess there will be silence for a day or two while you plough throughthe instructions. Your first impressions are positive and encouraging for the few of us left who are Dimage-less. Looking forward to a report in a few days
Dave

dave Forum Member • Posts: 65
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

Wayne-

Sorry to hear they hosed you and left that lever off. Pop that puppy back in the box and send it to me and I'll live with the mistake, so you can get a new one with all the parts.

Your theory about that focus issue possibly being caused by camera movement on long shots sounds really good- stick that little number on a tripod and I'll bet it snaps right into focus. (At least I hope so. I want it to work.)

I'll be interested to read your more experienced user report. Enjoy!

-dave

George Reeves Regular Member • Posts: 201
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

I may have a theory about the autofocus problem at 200mm - camera
shake! While I was playing around I noticed one or two times when
the lens racked itself in and out before locking, I also noticed
that I was offbalance and shaking. It is a 200mm equivalent -
shooter steadiness will have an impact on the autofocus being able
to lock on. When I braced myself it locked on a lot quicker.

My overall opinion: This camera is just plain NEAT!

Wayne

Thanks for taking the time to post your comments. I think you may have something with the theory on the autofocus at 200 mm. Mine should get here Tues. or Wed. and will experiment with this.

Thanks again,

George

David Martin Forum Pro • Posts: 17,056
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

Wayne wrote:

Well, I finally got my camera today.

Congrats on your ( hopefully ) happy union but sorry as hell you won't be making it to Europe.

Info for anyone who's interested on availability in UK:

London Camera Exchange in Bristol, England has them in stock at £990 inc VAT, £863.90 after the VAT rebate for non-EU customers
e-mail BRISTOL.HORSEFAIR@LCEGROUP.CO.UK

I'm trying to be sensible and wait for the price of Microdrives to drop and the camera to be fully debugged and rectified, but having got my hands on one I don't know if I'm going to last.

I fully concur with your comments on build quality, Wayne, and as for the EVF I just thought, WOW, that's just fine for me.

Aside with the the desirablity of the camera, if I don't buy one I won't have an excuse to hang out with you guys ( and of course, Tric and KT! )
Regards,
DaveMart

OP Wayne DeWitt Senior Member • Posts: 1,259
Some moer info...

Some might remember that I "went off" when someone had the temerity to compare the D7 to the Sony DSC S85. One of my comments was concerning the manual focus of the S85. Phil's spec sheet calls out 14 discrete steps from closest focus to infinity focus. I just checked the D7 - I got 27 steps at 28mm and over 100 at 200mm EFL - seems like Minolta has their act together here also.

And for the people who asked about the nature of the proximity sensor for the EVF I have a puzzling observation. It turns on the EVF when an object is about 2" away from the eyepiece. I placed a flashlight (torch to some of you) up against the eyepiece, the EVF came on. When I switched the flashlight on the EVF went off. Think you got it? Think again! I then passed my eyeglasses in front of the sensors (there are 2 windows), the EVF turns on when my glasses are held in front of the sensors (without my head being in them). It also turned on when I passed transparent cellophane in front of them. Very curious indeed. Could they have gone to the trouble of haveing a proximity sensor AND a light sensor incorporated? The dual-window setup would lead me to believe that it's a proximity sensor. But then the question is how is it accomplished? I.R. radiation? If it's a specific band it may reflect off of the glass and the cellophane the same as it would off of your face. Wouldn't explain the flashlight reaction though.

In the manual exposure mode ther is no "meter" presentation as such. But the EVF appears to be very accurate as it follows the exposure adjustments.

The spot metering does not appear to follow the flex point focusing - it stays in the center of the screen.

The following note is in the manual:" The camera temperature rises with extended periods of use. Care should be taken to avoid burns when handling the camera, batteries, or compact flash card." Man, all I can say to Minolta is don't ever order a cup of coffee from MacDonald's!

One sure way to tell if your camera is a U.S. version - look at the bottom of the camera for the FCC sticker. If, instead it has a European Union sticker, a VCI sticker(Japanese), or a Canadian sticker - IT AIN'T AMERICAN! Once again I want to reiterate I DID receive a Minolta U.S.A. Warranty card with my camera.

Also, one last thing. For those of you contemplating getting a non-Minolta AC adapter. Be aware that I've seen mention that the Minolta version is a 2amp unit. Most of the ones that you will find will be around 1200ma. - 1500ma., it's probably not a good idea to try to use one of these considering all that we know about power consumption in this camera.

Until later.
Wayne

 Wayne DeWitt's gear list:Wayne DeWitt's gear list
Minolta DiMAGE 7 Nikon Coolpix P510 Nikon Coolpix P7800 Kodak DCS Pro 14n Nikon D70 +2 more
Bryan Biggers Veteran Member • Posts: 3,567
Re: Some moer info...

Hi Wayne,

The way that these sensors work is that there is an IR emitter and sensor pair. Probably the emitter is behind one of the little windows to the right of the EVF, the sensor behind the other. When an IR reflective object approaches (and just about everything relfects near IR, which is why even glasses work), some of the light from the emitter is reflected into the sensor. The reason that the flashlight worked is probably just because it too reflected some IR. The actual light emitted is probably a pattern of pulses so that ambient IR does not trigger the EVF. Just cheap stuff, the same as you might find in an IR TV remote control.
Bryan

And for the people who asked about the nature of the proximity
sensor for the EVF I have a puzzling observation. It turns on the
EVF when an object is about 2" away from the eyepiece. I placed a
flashlight (torch to some of you) up against the eyepiece, the EVF
came on. When I switched the flashlight on the EVF went off. Think
you got it? Think again! I then passed my eyeglasses in front of
the sensors (there are 2 windows), the EVF turns on when my glasses
are held in front of the sensors (without my head being in them).
It also turned on when I passed transparent cellophane in front of
them. Very curious indeed. Could they have gone to the trouble of
haveing a proximity sensor AND a light sensor incorporated? The
dual-window setup would lead me to believe that it's a proximity
sensor. But then the question is how is it accomplished? I.R.
radiation? If it's a specific band it may reflect off of the glass
and the cellophane the same as it would off of your face. Wouldn't
explain the flashlight reaction though.

 Bryan Biggers's gear list:Bryan Biggers's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 Olympus PEN E-P3 Olympus OM-D E-M5 Olympus PEN E-PM2 Olympus E-M5 III
OP Wayne DeWitt Senior Member • Posts: 1,259
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

Checked on a few more things.

1. My B+W polarizer vignettes from 28mm- 55mm. B+W make just about the thickest ringed filters around. You should be o.k. with a slim Hoya filter. Get a slim filter without front threads and you'll be fine. Resist the urge to go to a larger filter if you intend to replace the hood for the actual exposure - it's not going to fit over anything larger than 49mm. My B+W vignettes only the very corners, but it does so with a vengence.

2. I checked again and can say with certainty that the metering system does not follow the flex focus point.

3. I've given more thought to the "Zoom Issue". Considering the amount of extension of the lens at 200mm EFL there is a considerable change in the volume of the air contained within the assembly. The "feeling" is most certainly due to seals/o-rings that prevent dust and debris from being sucked into the camera when you zoom.

Wayne

 Wayne DeWitt's gear list:Wayne DeWitt's gear list
Minolta DiMAGE 7 Nikon Coolpix P510 Nikon Coolpix P7800 Kodak DCS Pro 14n Nikon D70 +2 more
Brian T Regular Member • Posts: 188
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

Info for anyone who's interested on availability in UK:
London Camera Exchange in Bristol, England has them in stock at
£990 inc VAT, £863.90 after the VAT rebate for non-EU customers
e-mail BRISTOL.HORSEFAIR@LCEGROUP.CO.UK

Dave
Check out thread "UK availability" for a UK price you wont believe.

Brian T

David Roberts Regular Member • Posts: 240
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

Lots of good info. Doesn't seem that you or any of the others have unearthed anything horrendous and I'm looking forward to mine "some time next week."

Have you yet played around with the "Image Viewer Utility" software that comes with the camera. From a leaflet I have it seems to be a mini-Photoshop, with the ability to "fine-tune an image's tone curve and histogram, and includes adjustable settings for brightnerss and contrast, hue and colour saturation."

Strange that the Proctological Appendage has not horned in yet. However, that will probably come. in the meantime let's enjoy the silence.
Dave

OP Wayne DeWitt Senior Member • Posts: 1,259
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

Hi Dave;

No, I won't be able to play with the software until next week some time, still working on the hardware. I looked at the info in the manual for the software (yes there's a mini-manual for the software itself) it seems pretty good. It gives full hue, saturation, brightness, contrast, sharpness and histogram control - the sharpness setting even has a frequency control, I'm not familiar with that at all.

I don't think Bonzo will show up here - he doesn't post in my threads. Besides, I don't read his posts they're just pointless drivel. I only chide those who I see responding to him. After using this camera, even just fooling around for an hour, you couldn't GIVE me anything less. When I go to buy a real digital SLR it will definitely have an EVF - even if I have to switch systems to get it.

Wayne

 Wayne DeWitt's gear list:Wayne DeWitt's gear list
Minolta DiMAGE 7 Nikon Coolpix P510 Nikon Coolpix P7800 Kodak DCS Pro 14n Nikon D70 +2 more
arthur Senior Member • Posts: 1,266
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

My D7 arrived late Friday afternoon! Luckily my dealer received more than 1, because the first one we unpacked had a loose rubber cover on the DC connector bay. I tried a quick portrait shot of my white cat. My preliminary conclusion is that I can blur out a background better with the D7 than with my E10. I love the compact size! The zoom feels good to me. I see what Phil means about the focus - not as sure footed as I hoped for - perhaps more Vectis class than Maxxum class, but still acceptable compared to what I've become acustomed to with digital cameras. If you release pressure from the shutter button, then press half way again, it seems to start searching for the focus from scratch rather than refining from where you left off. The D7's I tried all seem to have shipped with wrong default diopter adjustment on the finder - they all needed some adjusting. Weight balance of the camera feels ok to me, maybe because the camera is so small and light to begin with and I'm used to keeping the left hand on the zoom ring. I'm not pleased with the documentation for the viewer program. I think I'll be spending some time reviewing Phil's or Steve's description.

Saturday morning - In light of day I could discern a thin vertical blue streak down my 780 print of my first two test shots. I hoped it was my printer glitching, but armed with knowing just where to look, sure enough the same streak was in the raw photos straight out of the camera. Had to make a quick run back to my dealer and trade the 2nd camera in for the 3rd. Clearly there is an advantage to buying from your local dealer - at least I wasn't shipping cameras back to Minolta. (This one better work - I've run through all the cameras they received.) My dealer said they've seen this symptom from light leaks, but to me it looks more like one whole column of the imager chip was not being read properly.

Based upon my experience - 2 out of a sample of 3 very obviously defective, it would appear that Minolta quality control is the customer. But this is not unique to D7's. A month ago my dealer encountered a string of perhaps worse problems in a shipment of E-10s.

PS- I must have a perverse streak. My previous cat was jet black, and this one is solid white - the two worst subject colors - but an excellent test for how well a camera can do. This cat is an odd eyed white (one blue and one chartreuse eye). With her pink nose I could almost call her RGB. The weird thing is that while the blue eye will get traditional red eye from a flash, the chartreuse eye gets green eye! Has anyone ever retouched green eyie? Rather than face retouching green eye I took that first shot with evening ambient light and very strong shadows across my cat.

Leo Terminello Regular Member • Posts: 205
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

I am so glad to see such knowlegeable people with new D7's really examining what is my new cam also. I have to wait another 3 days for mine. What the D7 is capable of and in a tiny package is, to me at least, awesome. I will probably get through the manual faster than usual thanks to you guy's. Thanks, Leo

OP Wayne DeWitt Senior Member • Posts: 1,259
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

From the manual:

"Occasionally, when using alkaline batteries, the battery-condition indicator will give a false low-battery-power warning, even though there is enough power capacity. Continue to use the camera; the low battery indicator will disappear. YEAH, WHEN THE BATTERIES ARE REALLY DEAD! LOL

"The rim of the lens hood can cause injury. Take care not to accidentally strike anyone with the camera when the lens hood is attached."

I guess you should remove the lens hood before accidentally striking someone (wonder if that will hold up in court?).

One last thing before I turn in. When you shoot in RAW the playback on the monitor and in the EVF is pretty ugly. The camera doesn't put the file through a processing algorithm as it will in the included program. The colors are yellow/green - yuck! Was worried until I RTFM! Night.

Wayne

 Wayne DeWitt's gear list:Wayne DeWitt's gear list
Minolta DiMAGE 7 Nikon Coolpix P510 Nikon Coolpix P7800 Kodak DCS Pro 14n Nikon D70 +2 more
Kate Smith Regular Member • Posts: 443
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

Dave Martin wrote:

I'm trying to be sensible and wait for the price of Microdrives to
drop and the camera to be fully debugged and rectified, but having
got my hands on one I don't know if I'm going to last.
I fully concur with your comments on build quality, Wayne, and as
for the EVF I just thought, WOW, that's just fine for me.
Aside with the the desirablity of the camera, if I don't buy one
I won't have an excuse to hang out with you guys ( and of course,
Tric and KT! )
Regards,
DaveMart

Dave

You can get a 1 gig microdrive for £248.00 inc vat at Digital Depot, and you are right, if you don't jump in the water with us we won't let you play!!

Kate

David Martin Forum Pro • Posts: 17,056
Re: My first impressions - and some info...

KT wrote:

Dave Martin wrote:

I'm trying to be sensible and wait for the price of Microdrives to
drop and the camera to be fully debugged and rectified, but having
got my hands on one I don't know if I'm going to last.
I fully concur with your comments on build quality, Wayne, and as
for the EVF I just thought, WOW, that's just fine for me.
Aside with the the desirablity of the camera, if I don't buy one
I won't have an excuse to hang out with you guys ( and of course,
Tric and KT! )
Regards,
DaveMart

Dave

You can get a 1 gig microdrive for £248.00 inc vat at Digital
Depot, and you are right, if you don't jump in the water with us we
won't let you play!!

Kate

KT

My bank manager doesn't even know you, and already he hates you! But the thing about temptation is, always give in at once or it may pass you by.
Regards,

OP Wayne DeWitt Senior Member • Posts: 1,259
About batteries...

Something strange may be going on with the power management of the D7. I haven't had time to sort this out yet but I do have an observation. When the camera shuts down for lack of power I of course replace the batteries. I've noticed that they are no where near as hot at this point as they get with my Casio under like conditions. When I charge said batteries they recharge in a shorter than expected time. It may be that the batteries in fact have a significant amount of energy left. The manual has a warning concerning the early display of the low battery signal with alkalines - I wonder if there's a problem with NiMH also? My work schedule is too heavy for the next few weeks to allow me to check into this further, maybe someone who also works in electronics can rig-up a test fixture to see what voltage and Wh are left in the batteries. We've been doing some work at my company with Nimh batteries lately - I'll see if one of our technicians has a test already set-up.

Wayne

 Wayne DeWitt's gear list:Wayne DeWitt's gear list
Minolta DiMAGE 7 Nikon Coolpix P510 Nikon Coolpix P7800 Kodak DCS Pro 14n Nikon D70 +2 more
Bryan Biggers Veteran Member • Posts: 3,567
Re: About batteries...

Hi Wayne,

I'm thinking the same thing. I am getting the false battery low message with NiMH also. It seems to happen when there is some extra current draw, like if you put your eye up to the EVF and it is set to turn on, or if you run the focus motor. When the batteries are done, they are not completely drained, and they aren't that hot as you said.

I'm thinking now that it may correlate with just certain sets of NiMH that I have. I have 5 or 6 sets, but only one set is 1600 mAH, have to get some more. Possibly some can provide less current than the others. The camera must be super current hungry, and when a set can't provide enough, it thinks that they are done and gives up on some sets before they are drained.
Bryan

Wayne wrote:

Something strange may be going on with the power management of the
D7. I haven't had time to sort this out yet but I do have an
observation. When the camera shuts down for lack of power I of
course replace the batteries. I've noticed that they are no where
near as hot at this point as they get with my Casio under like
conditions. When I charge said batteries they recharge in a shorter
than expected time. It may be that the batteries in fact have a
significant amount of energy left. The manual has a warning
concerning the early display of the low battery signal with
alkalines - I wonder if there's a problem with NiMH also? My work
schedule is too heavy for the next few weeks to allow me to check
into this further, maybe someone who also works in electronics can
rig-up a test fixture to see what voltage and Wh are left in the
batteries. We've been doing some work at my company with Nimh
batteries lately - I'll see if one of our technicians has a test
already set-up.

Wayne

 Bryan Biggers's gear list:Bryan Biggers's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 Olympus PEN E-P3 Olympus OM-D E-M5 Olympus PEN E-PM2 Olympus E-M5 III
David J. Brown Regular Member • Posts: 105
Re: About batteries...

Perhaps I can help a bit here. If the drain is high on the battery (cells) for a short period, the actual output from the cell pack, i.e., the battery, will decrease at this point. However, after the drain is REDUCED for a subsequent period of time, the voltage will be inclined to creep up again.

Although I do not have the D7 yet, I suspect that the "trigger voltage" on the chip in the camera that detects "low" voltage has been triggered--that is, the circuitry "thinks" that the battery is actually exhausted.

Hope this explanation helps you folks some.

Bryan Biggers wrote:
Hi Wayne,
I'm thinking the same thing. I am getting the false battery low
message with NiMH also. It seems to happen when there is some extra
current draw, like if you put your eye up to the EVF and it is set
to turn on, or if you run the focus motor. When the batteries are
done, they are not completely drained, and they aren't that hot as
you said.
I'm thinking now that it may correlate with just certain sets of
NiMH that I have. I have 5 or 6 sets, but only one set is 1600 mAH,
have to get some more. Possibly some can provide less current than
the others. The camera must be super current hungry, and when a set
can't provide enough, it thinks that they are done and gives up on
some sets before they are drained.
Bryan

Wayne wrote:

Something strange may be going on with the power management of the
D7. I haven't had time to sort this out yet but I do have an
observation. When the camera shuts down for lack of power I of
course replace the batteries. I've noticed that they are no where
near as hot at this point as they get with my Casio under like
conditions. When I charge said batteries they recharge in a shorter
than expected time. It may be that the batteries in fact have a
significant amount of energy left. The manual has a warning
concerning the early display of the low battery signal with
alkalines - I wonder if there's a problem with NiMH also? My work
schedule is too heavy for the next few weeks to allow me to check
into this further, maybe someone who also works in electronics can
rig-up a test fixture to see what voltage and Wh are left in the
batteries. We've been doing some work at my company with Nimh
batteries lately - I'll see if one of our technicians has a test
already set-up.

Wayne

talon New Member • Posts: 11
Re: About batteries...

After using the D7 for 5 days now and charging my 1800mah nimh battereis numerous times, I have found that if you use the EVF only, not the rear Display, you will get a good run out of your batteries. I'm currently on the same set of batteries, using a Microdrive, have used the flash, probably 30% of the time, and have taken around 90 pics. . The camera goes into power save after 1 minute. Focusing can be a little slow at times. I haven't tried the continuous focus yet. Still "learning" all of the features. I have ordered a ProPower Pack V (Unity Digital) 6v, 2700mAh for extended outings. This pack combined with a couple of sets of 1800mah batteries should do the trick for all day outings.

Oh, love the camera!

T.

David J. Brown wrote:
Perhaps I can help a bit here. If the drain is high on the battery
(cells) for a short period, the actual output from the cell pack,
i.e., the battery, will decrease at this point. However, after the
drain is REDUCED for a subsequent period of time, the voltage will
be inclined to creep up again.

Although I do not have the D7 yet, I suspect that the "trigger
voltage" on the chip in the camera that detects "low" voltage has
been triggered--that is, the circuitry "thinks" that the battery is
actually exhausted.

Hope this explanation helps you folks some.

Bryan Biggers wrote:
Hi Wayne,
I'm thinking the same thing. I am getting the false battery low
message with NiMH also. It seems to happen when there is some extra
current draw, like if you put your eye up to the EVF and it is set
to turn on, or if you run the focus motor. When the batteries are
done, they are not completely drained, and they aren't that hot as
you said.
I'm thinking now that it may correlate with just certain sets of
NiMH that I have. I have 5 or 6 sets, but only one set is 1600 mAH,
have to get some more. Possibly some can provide less current than
the others. The camera must be super current hungry, and when a set
can't provide enough, it thinks that they are done and gives up on
some sets before they are drained.
Bryan

Wayne wrote:

Something strange may be going on with the power management of the
D7. I haven't had time to sort this out yet but I do have an
observation. When the camera shuts down for lack of power I of
course replace the batteries. I've noticed that they are no where
near as hot at this point as they get with my Casio under like
conditions. When I charge said batteries they recharge in a shorter
than expected time. It may be that the batteries in fact have a
significant amount of energy left. The manual has a warning
concerning the early display of the low battery signal with
alkalines - I wonder if there's a problem with NiMH also? My work
schedule is too heavy for the next few weeks to allow me to check
into this further, maybe someone who also works in electronics can
rig-up a test fixture to see what voltage and Wh are left in the
batteries. We've been doing some work at my company with Nimh
batteries lately - I'll see if one of our technicians has a test
already set-up.

Wayne

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