About volume and weight of gear for travel

Started 3 months ago | Discussions thread
Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 9,807
Re: Some from 1974

deednets wrote:

Mike Fewster wrote:

deednets wrote:

Mike Fewster wrote:

deednets wrote:

Mike Fewster wrote:

I have written about my travel set up several times here.

Here's my thinking. Changing lenses while traveling is a PITA and forever risks having to be done in circumstances where you might hesitate to open your camera.

Good zoom lenses are now far better than was once the case. The 20-70F4 Sony is my dream come true travel lens. It is also very cropable on modern Sony sensors. I'm entirely happy to use it to cover from 20-100 , with cropping, focal length. I no longer need a faster lens. I'm happy to raise iso and use Topaz or similar to clean an image up if I think it needs it. I'd add the voightlander for the wider cover, unless you are into was starscapes and here you might need something faster.

Those two lenses will give you a fast, lightweight set up where lens changing wont be a hassle. I travelled recently in Thailand where you will have similar conditions.

I dont want my camera gear to have to travel below on planes. My suggested set up can stay with you in the cabin. In my main checked in bag I have a small, lightweight camera bag that can be used on the street once we have arrived and I'm out shooting.

A PITA it maybe for you but I have done international travel on planes for more than 40 years so have some idea as to what it's like to change a lens. 100+ trips to tropical locations rainforests, deserts, often 3 to 4 trips a year going through a multitude

I take it your advice was in good faith and you wanted to help, which is fine, just wanted to point out that I am not a beginner.

I use a little less than an A4 page bag for 2 lenses in Fuji "wraps", plus the camera and a second battery and a couple of SD cards, not because I shoot so much, but because I sometimes forget to delete previous collections So also know how to travel with those 3 lenses, a total of 1600 grams. At my final destination I often leave one or 2 lenses at the hotel, should I stay at a hotel that is ...

Northwest Vietnam can get quite cold by the way even during the day as the whole area is quite mountainous.

Thanks for trying but my guess is that you and me are not on the same train on this one ...

Deed

I agree that this is horses for courses territory and we all have different styles and therefore ideas on what we need.

Actually, I'm 81 and I have been doing this for a lot, a real lot, of years. My first overseas trip was with a single camera, a mamiya C330. My favourite one camera solution in recent years was Europe with an RX1. Have a good trip.

Hi Mike I must say that you come across here as younger?? Not bad thing me thinks ...

I have also used the RX1, all 3 or them on various trips, so have a lot of time for that camera! The supject isolation of that Zeiss 35/2 Sonar I thought was something else, really loved it! (love=like: internet speak!!).

RX1

Now, regarding lens changes: I think in general terms this is overrated. I went to Page in 2014 and had a few primes on me and changed lenses inside Antelope Canyon, dusty as, without any issues.

Antelope Canyon, 2014, used the 23 and the 14mm lenses

Horses for courses indeed, in rainforests or the likes never really found it to be an issue. The RX1s weren't weather sealed so my only concession was not to shoot those near or under waterfalls or in the rain ... but apart from that?

Hunan Province, China 2016, GX8, weather-resistant, it was just wet-wet-wet most of the time ...

My RX1r stayed in the bag during those long walks ...

Deed

You got me reminiscing. I dug out some of my Mamiya C330 shots from travelling in Europe in 1974 and scanned them

Spanish Village

Trying to get things vertical. You know where.

Greek Village. Samos.

The Italian shot won several prizes and almost convinced me to do this professionally. I haven't looked at these in years. Thanks for reminding me to look at them again Deed.

Some really excellent shots you have here! You were 31 then? One year after "the end is nigh" oil crisis?

The most striking shot I think is the Spanish village one, so many things wrong with it, but the allover impression stays with you long after the lights are out. What a fantastic photo!!

The Samos shot? Dunno, but the playfulness of the boy quite something. I can also see the attraction of the Italian Job, but of those 3, the Spanish one takes the cake me thinks.

An interesting twist on this thread! Appreciate it!

Deed

Your calculations are correct. I was 31. I'd been taking photos since my teens.This was travel with a single camera and two lenses. Mamiya C330 plus 80mm and 180mm. Those lenses were huge as each lens had to be to have two lenses, one for exposing the shot and the other gave the image for the viewer. Loved that camera though.

I learned an important lesson from this trip. I had my own darkroom and did all my own developing using the Adams zone system. By the time the trip was finished i had a bag full of exposed but undeveloped film that I was very nervous about. Took the lot to a pro lab in London to have it developed before the return flight. Either my exposures were wrong or their development was. The whole lot came back with too much contrast. They were a nighmare to print and all had to be done on low contrast paper. They still have too much contrast. It was the last time I ever let my B&W film out to be developed.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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