What are these waves in the sky visible on some .ORFs ?

Started 6 months ago | Questions thread
Guy Parsons
Guy Parsons Forum Pro • Posts: 38,211
Re: What are these waves in the sky visible on some .ORFs ?
1

stokey wrote:

RSTP14 wrote:

My guess is the RAW is in AdobeRGB and you are displaying in sRGB, and the sRGB doesn't have the colors to display all the gradations in the sky. The in-camera JPEG would be sRGB.

I wasn't aware that one could set the camera to apply different colour spaces to the RAW and JPEG.

Bob

Setting the colour space to sRGB or to Adobe RGB only has an effect on the camera jpeg. The raw file has no colour space but has the jpeg setting stored within its exif data. A raw converter may by default use that stored colour space setting, or the user can choose another colour space during the raw conversion.

Just for fun I opened a raw file (my camera jpegs are set for sRGB) and in Affinity Photo as an example I can choose any of 34 colour choices to use for output. Naturally the default is sRGB IEC61966-2.1 which I have to assume is the one found in the raw file exif data.

The Affinity help file says this...

About color space

Each output device, for example, your display or printer, is only capable of producing a certain range of colors. A color space is a specific implementation of the color model used to define the color gamut (i.e., the range of available color). For example, Adobe RGB, sRGB, Apple RGB, and so on, are all unique color spaces for the RGB color model. Different color spaces are also available for CMYK and Lab color models.

Each output device, for example, your display or printer, is only capable of producing a certain range of colors. A color space is a specific implementation of the color model used to define the color gamut (i.e., the range of available color). For example, sRGB, Apple RGB, and so on, are all unique color spaces for the RGB color model. Different color spaces are also available for CMYK and Lab color models.

In order for a device to know which color space to use, it looks at the assigned color profile. You can choose your color space by assigning a color profile to your document.

Which color space should I use?

Which color space you choose depends on what you're doing and the color model you're choosing to operate in.

If you're unsure of what color space to operate, it's advisable to stick with the default sRGB IEC61966-2.1 profile if using the RGB color model.

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