Basic non-basic editor for 4K

Started 5 months ago | Discussions thread
OP GI Regular Member • Posts: 255
Re: Basic non-basic editor for 4K

Sean Nelson wrote:

GI wrote:

Sean Nelson wrote:

If he does the basic editing in Quicktime then he can color grade the entire video as a monolithic unit in Resolve but it'll be a lot harder if he wants to apply different grading to each clip in the video. I think if he needs to grade clips individually then it'll be easier to do it all in Resolve.

Could you help me with terminology here. You guys use "color grading" all the time. Is that the same as color correction (temperature and tint) in stills (Photoshop, Lightroom, etc)? Is exposure correction (curve, levels, highlights, shadows, contrast, etc) part of "color grading"?

In a nutshell, yes. Colour grading is a term that tends to be used in the cinema production world, and it includes what you've described. Resolve includes tools to adjust the luma or per-channel curves, the shadows / midtones / highlights (although it's called Lift / Gamma / Gain in the video world and in Resolve), temperature, hue, saturation, mid-tone detail ("Clarity" in Photoshop) and so on. It also has aids such as a histogram and "scopes" that show you the distribution of luma or per-channel brightness to aid you in your adjustments, and a "vectorscope" to aid in colour balance.

Where Resolve goes well beyond Photoshop is in tools that allow you to apply these adjustments to moving images. For example, you can create what's called a "Power Window" in Resolve. Imagine drawing an oval that covers a person's face - that's a "Power Window". You can apply unique color adjustments to the area within the window (and feather the edges so that the adjustment boundary isn't noticeable) and then apply a tracker to it so that the adjustments follow the person's face throughout the clip. And you can keyframe adjustments - this is great when you have a clip that pans and the camera's auto-exposure changes during the pan creating a dip or bump in brightness. It allows you to change shadow/midtone/highlight curves dynamically as the clip plays.

You don't have to use all this capability, of course, you can just stick to the simple curves and whatnot. But if you've got a shot where you think "I sure wish I could lighten the face of that guy who's in the shadows" then Resolve can do it, and much more.

Here's a 9-minute video I found that shows you the basics of colour manipulation.

Thank you so much for taking the time and write such detailed and clear explanations! Truly appreciated.

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