Evaluating a Tilt Lens for Real Estate -- recommendations ?

Started 2 months ago | Discussions thread
xtam667 Regular Member • Posts: 130
Re: Evaluating a Tilt Lens for Real Estate -- recommendations ?

NCV wrote:

Kumsa wrote:

CONTEXT: I have the opportunity to retire and do some steady (<40 hr/week) real estate photography. My current lenses that would be most appropriate are 14mm, 35mm, 28-75mm (I have other lenses, but they aren't as applicable).

Between interior images in tight-spaces and exterior building images, I'm considering the viability of a Tilt lens. I'm just saying Tilt and not Tilt/Shift, as there are models that don't shift and I'm not convinced of a shift benefit for real estate (though, it's a nice-to-have).

I've always looked longingly at a Tilt lens, but couldn't justify the addition. And, I might just be rationalizing the expenditure. So, for the purpose of this question, I'm only asking about the selection of possible Tilt options.

In terms of lighting, stands/tripods, etc., I'm good.

QUESTIONS: any recommendations on the return value for these different choices for Real Estate ?

  • Canon 17mm T/S + Rogeti frame . Est. at $2,480.
  • Venus Optics Laowa 15mm f/4.5 Zero-D + mount. Est. at $1,350
  • Samyang 24mm f/3.5 MF AS UMC TS. Est. used at $600.

Thanks all for any shared experience.

I do architectural photography for fun and to make some material for my studio website.

The advantage of shift lenses is that you compose in camera and not have the hit and miss situation of when you do it in post and lose part of the frame.

I have three shift lenses, a Nikon 24TS, Nikon 28PC and Nikon35PC. The last two are old manual focus F lenses. They can be found on eBay quite cheaply and are still good lenses.

I had the Samyang and hated it. Optically it is needs some sharpening in post and it is lacking in contrast. The controls were a pain. It is an OK lens if you are on a budget and can live with making compromises. The Nikon 24TS is on another planet in every way.

The Venus seems a good lens , but if you use Canon I would go for the 17TS as you will have some level of electrical contact to see aperture.

I would not bother with the Rogeti frame. The in camera level is enough most times. A geared tripod head is a must for this type of photography. You can tweak any small keystoning or rotation in post.

The point of the Rogeti frame is not leveling. With it you can shift the lens without parallax error. The lens stays in place and the body shifts. Very useful for stitched panoramas of interiors.

A geared tripod head helps indeed.

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