Best fast cheap 50ish mm for APS-C with the creamiest bokeh?

Started 5 months ago | Discussions thread
backsidewalkaround Regular Member • Posts: 201
Re: Best fast cheap 50ish mm for APS-C with the creamiest bokeh?
2

fferreres wrote:

E Dinkla wrote:

fferreres wrote:

sensiblename99 wrote:

E Dinkla wrote:

Photography Raptor wrote:

Being the bokeh that the Nikkor 58mm f/1.4 G produces the one I like the most for reference.

Corner sharpness of vigneting is not important as it is going to be adapted on APS-C.

RIght now I'm considering the Pentax-M 50mm f/1.4 but I'm sure there has to be better options.

P.S. I'm not a big fan of the famous Helios 44-2 bokeh.

Thanks in advance

This might help you:

https://theothersideofbokeh.wordpress.com/2017/10/25/50-fifties-bokeh-overview-the-fast-ones/

https://theothersideofbokeh.wordpress.com/2017/10/26/50-fifties-bokeh-overview-the-ones-with-character/

Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst
No photographer's gear list is complete without the printer mentioned !

Any idea which camera was used for these tests, it's not mentioned on the page?

I'm curious because I have a few of these lenses and would expect them to show purple fringing to some degree but I don't see any in these tests shots.

He frequents the forum. I can’t remember the handle though . In 2017 he mentioned he had a Canon 5D2 and A7m1.

Back then I was using the original A7. I mention the camera in the second article of that series in which I compared the center sharpness of the lenses.

It’s good to see that article again. Of all, the slower Tessar stands out as having the least outlining. Really, smooth bokeh is more about lack (or dimming) of the speculative highlights than anything else. Absent apoditization, which none have, only an undercorrected lens will result in smoother bokeh. Number of blades doesn’t matter wide open, but a big issue is that dirt is maybe 10x more prevalent on were glass meets metal, which causes outlining on it’s own, so the smooth lens either requires a bit of stopping down or a recent CLA.

Backsidewalkaround. I have no Idea whether his lenses were UV treated and had a CLA. Given the thorough jobs done in testing and his nationality I would be surprised if they were not checked.

I am almost 100% sure they did not get CLA or UV treatment, save for some potential favorite lens like the Rollei or C/Y ones.

To answer that question: They did not get neither CLA nor UV treatment, but I only used lenses that didn't have any obvious flaws. I spent a few extra Euros to buy what seemed to be good copies, but in almost all cases only one per lens. This means: while different outcomes in sharpness may be quite probable (due to copy variation), I don't think that the bokeh of the same lens will vary all that much.

Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst
No photographer's gear list is complete without the printer mentioned !

From images on the web and a few experiences of my own, I would second the opinion of QuietOC, that many modern Chinese lenses likely have much smoother bokeh than all the vintage ones, including the MC Rokkor 1.2/58. The Mitakon Speedmaster is only the first that hit the market and a very good, yet expensive one. 
If smooth bokeh is always "better" is a whole new question, though ;-).

 backsidewalkaround's gear list:backsidewalkaround's gear list
Sony a7R III Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM Art Sony Vario-Tessar T* FE 16-35mm F4 ZA OSS Sony FE 50mm F1.4 ZA Sony FE 200-600 F5.6-6.3 +1 more
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