Macro focussing rails

Started 4 months ago | Questions thread
mawyatt2002
mawyatt2002 Contributing Member • Posts: 502
Re: Thorlabs Piezo stage for a Stack&Stitch system

Guito55 wrote:

I have used a piezoelectric stage with stackshot for stacking but don't know what brand the piezoelectric stage was. It was for a microprocessor shot. I think there's someone here (or in the diy or photo experiment forum) that created their own piezoelectric stage.

It ain't for the faint of heart!

That was probably me (Mike at Mike's Labs), here's some links over at Photomacrography on the development of the Piezo Stages for focus stacking.

https://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=40679&hilit=Piezo+Stage

https://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=40681&hilit=Piezo+Stage

https://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=40682&hilit=Piezo+Stage

https://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=40510&hilit=Piezo+Stage

And link here at DPR.

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/4441997

Yes it was quite involved and expensive (probably cost $5000), but the result was worth the effort IMO (sub-micron to nanometer levels of performance with the Closed Loop Systems). Now it's more straightforward and affordable (less than $500 total including PI stage) since all the initial research and development have been completed. I'm getting ready to assemble and test a couple more control systems for someone for a university research project, these are the last of the custom developed PCBs available, may need to reorder.

The Stackshot is a current mode Sine and Cosine stepper motor driver/controller ( I had one many years ago before I developed my own multi-axis stepper motor controllers based around the Trinmaic devices). Most stepper motor controllers like Stackshot utilize the motor winding inductance as part of the control scheme, and the motors are current driven not voltage driven.

I am very curious how you were able to configure a Stackshot to work with a piezo electric stage since these are voltage driven (usually very high voltages >100V) and are highly capacitive (usually >1uF) with little inductance??

Best,

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Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike

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