4K HQ = 8K Locked

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AlexKalimat
AlexKalimat Forum Member • Posts: 95
Re: 4K HQ = 8K

eleison24 wrote:

jonpais wrote:

"The future of TV is in better pixels, not just more of them," Neil Hunt, Netflix's Chief Product Officer, said speaking with Digital Spy.

On this front, and with the benefits of cramming more pixels into the same size panel almost undetectable to the human eye, he added: "8K is only interesting if you're going to sit too close to the TV."

The philosophy of the visionaries at Netflix is nearly identical to that of one of the most respected names in filmmaking, Arri. They both also happen to embrace HDR for its incomparably greater contribution to image quality than 8K.

How many devices can display HDR (especially in a theatre setting?) I think only Dolby Cinema. How many of those exist compared to the regular 2k theatres? After thinking about what you said, the future is not "better pixels". Instead, it's always been about capturing the image. With 8k, you can get medium, wide, and close up shots. The process of making movies have relied heavily on editing. I think it was said, there are three movies being made at any one time -- the first movie is the one envisioned by the script writer, the 2nd is one envisioned by the director, and the last one -- the one that usually ends up on the screen is the one created by the editor.

The editor doesn't really care about HDR; a lot of them care about reframing, close ups, missing clips that don't follow the story line, etc. 8k allows editors more flexibility (when edited on a 2k timeline), therefore, I feel resolution is more important than HDR. Hell, you can also do an artificial pan in higher resolution.

Netflix says it cares about HDR, but if you had a 2k (created from an 8k source) movie that had a great story that everyone wanted to watch; netflix wouldn't care if it had HDR or not. Netflix would buy it off of you.

8k means having more footage to tell a story.. Which means it's more important than HDR. Hdr means very little to the story. Having more footage mean more options to craft a better story.

The whole thing about post-flexibility is a bit overplayed in my opinion. Filmmaking is about directing attention. And if you’re shooting narrative content for Netflix (or anywhere else for that matter) and you haven’t nailed your shot-list prior to shooting, you likely have more issues in your production than can be fixed by punching-in on a few shots in editing!

Digital zooms and pans are cheap and nasty because things don’t move in the same way they would with the human eye. No parallax or change of perspective. If used excessively they have the potential to pull you out of the story not immerse you into it further.

Documentary content, yes — cropping in an interview shot is a great way of getting a CU or BCU as well as an MCU, or doing post stabilization. However for GVs and B-roll — due to lens distortion, getting a good looking crop from a wide angle lens is more challenging that you’d think. In reality, if your camera operator doesn’t “know” what they are filming, you’re unlikely to pull a great composition from a mediocre one in post.

The only area where shooting in obscene resolutions really pays off is VFX. I can see could be useful to film in 8K or higher to pull individual characters out of wider scenes. Although even in this area, it’s less common to need to shoot wide, as the tech allowing directors and DPs to visualize and frame the final shot “through the lens” while they’re on set is now more commonplace.

So in all of these circumstance 6K is probably enough to deliver 4K content. And given advances in up-rezzing software, possibly 4K is enough to deliver 4K content for the few shots you’d actually want to upscale!

HDR on the other hand is about creating more visually immersive experiences. HDR is increasingly common for TVs because most are technically capable of displaying way more than a 32:1, 5-stop, Rec 709 image. Given we perceive about 10-14 stops, but only about 3-3.5K (at normal viewing distances) wouldn’t HDR content as another way of immersing the audience in the storytelling, seems like a “no-brainer” doesn’t it?

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