why do digital files colours looks so bad without post

Started 4 months ago | Questions thread
Mark Scott Abeln
Mark Scott Abeln Forum Pro • Posts: 15,757
Re: Questions

whosthatwhatsthat wrote:

Mark Scott Abeln wrote:

I'm not sure that tethering has anything to do with this.

By placing a neutral target in a photograph, you can adjust the white balance in your raw processor.

but then surely if not tethering you've done your whole shoot only to then have to adjust everything in your raw processor to correct it. so what does the neutral target do, or I set my white balance according to the neutral target in camera.

In the screen shot below, there is an eyedropper tool next to the White balance adjustment. Select the tool, and then click on an object in the photograph that is presumably neutral. That will adjust the white balance. Once you correct one shot, you can copy the adjustment to every other photo taken during the session (I do this in Bridge) and there is the "Previous Conversion" option in Adobe Camera Raw that will apply the settings from the previous image to the current image.

Yes, I can eyeball it because I have a calibrated monitor; I would not suggest adjusting color by sight with a non-calibrated monitor.

how do you calibrate a monitor do you calibrate to be in line with your camera or??

Monitors are calibrated according to a color standard. This requires a hardware monitor calibration device which costs a few hundred US dollars. Macs include a crude visual calibration utility that can get somewhat close.

But I also adjust color by the color values found in the image file, and by other means.

how do I find the colour values is that from the colour profiles in raw processor

Eventually you'll convert the colors of the raw file into a standard color space, such as sRGB, Adobe RGB, or ProPhoto. The values in the raw file are called 'device numbers' which are not in any particular color space, and which don't directly correspond to human color vision; raw processors convert these device numbers to values in a standard color space.

The color numbers in these color spaces correspond to precise visual colors (assuming a standard viewing condition and good color vision as found in young, healthy subjects). The actual numbers depend on the color space in use, but generally speaking, where the red, green, and blue numbers are equal, then the color is a neutral, such as pure white, black, or gray.

This old article may be helpful:

https://therefractedlight.blogspot.com/2010/08/color-spaces-part-1-rgb.html

Do you have the latest version of Photoshop? The color profiles are listed near the top of the menu in Adobe Camera Raw:

but what if I don't want the jpeg colour, I'm shooting raw so why would I want it to replicate the jpeg render. is the jpeg render the one shown on my lcd?

Yes, what you see on the back screen of your camera is a JPEG rendering of the raw file as processed by the camera itself according to your settings.

Many people do like the JPEG rendering of their camera but shoot raw in order to have more flexibility in processing. I used to use Nikon's raw processor for this reason.  Raw files contain more data than what's found in a JPEG and so you can do extreme edits on your files after the fact. For example, suppose you are in a hurry while shooting and don't have time to set a good white balance, or even get your exposure right. You can recover a lot more data from a raw file than from a JPEG.

Nowadays, I know more of what I want my images to look like than I did before, so I'm no longer relying on Nikon's software, but rather use Adobe and other raw processors.

Technology marches on, and so it is entirely possible that a modern raw processor can give better results than the JPEG engine found in your camera, even if you don't make any changes to the color rendering.

but when I got to save for web I then need to change to srgb so wont there be a difference in colour?

Camera raw data is not in any particular standard color space which can be interpreted by other computer software, printers, or monitors, and so the raw data needs to be processed into a standard color space that can be understood by these things.

right so whats the best way to achieve neutral camera settings? by importing and just selecting camera neutral on photoshop

That's the way I do it.

Or, you can use your camera manufacturer's own raw software, and you can use whatever camera color rendering settings that you want, although it will also automatically detect and apply whatever settings you used in your camera.

 Mark Scott Abeln's gear list:Mark Scott Abeln's gear list
Nikon D200 Nikon D7000 Nikon D750 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D +2 more
Post (hide subjects) Posted by
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
(unknown member)
(unknown member)
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
MOD Biggs23
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark MMy threads
Color scheme? Blue / Yellow