why do digital files colours looks so bad without post

Started 3 months ago | Questions thread
OP whosthatwhatsthat Forum Member • Posts: 77
Re: why do digital files colours looks so bad without post

Brev00 wrote:

whosthatwhatsthat wrote:

As a heads up, I know the title is going to cause a stir, please take it with a pinch of salt.

I think the reason you are aware that your title may be incendiary is because you are implying your preference for film by attacking digital. You could have expressed this more openly,positively, and subjectively: Why do I Like Film colors so Much. For example.

negative f course, many factors come into play.

My reason is I want to know what is that gives these images more of a high-end look, they're by Juergen Teller for W mag from January 2020.

Perhaps because you like the looks and/or acting chops of these particular celebrities? Can't blame you. Joaquin is unbelievable. Why he didn't even get nominated for Walk the Line while Reese won her category is beyond me.

Even the shot of Joaquin Phoenix indoors looks great, I believe its just natural light but I'm curious as to how it doesn't have that sort of washed or flat look that digital can produce indoors.

The shots are evenly lit as others have mentioned. But, I don't know what you mean by flat. Film is designed to create specific color palettes while unprocessed digital files have a more neutral appearance especially when using a neutral or flat (!) profile (and raw). Added saturation in digital files looks like saturation has been added while with film, we accept the inherent level of saturation since it has an internal coherence. And we like the type of film we like. We like Velvia but not because it is realistic. If we shoot jpegs, we can create our own profile presets.

Are these images desaturated then in certain areas more colour contrast is brought in?

Please do not just say he can afford great post-production, yes we know that but I want to know how it's done and also any tips into creating shots like these when shooting to make images seem more high-end and luxurious.

I am not a portrait photographer, but I think a lot depends on the set up. Lighting and white balance cards, for example. There is also the matter of perspective and composition. These shots are taken level to the subject. The intention is to create a real connection with the subject.

interesting point there!

With the pic of the woman, the intention is to create drama. That's the reason for the backlighting. With dramatic shots comes increased post work. The intention is to create an impression on the viewer rather than a connection to the subject. The sense of unreality is accepted. Except by certain, perceptive sorts like yourself.

I retired from film long ago so am completely in the world of digital. So, I unconsciously accept the appearance of digital. I have nothing to compare it to!

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