P1000: The world's largest tidal bore

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Booted Cat Regular Member • Posts: 405
P1000: The world's largest tidal bore
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The Qiantang River and Hangzhou Bay are known for the world's largest tidal bore. Every year the tide reaches its highest level on August 18 in the Chinese Lunar Calendar, which is September 16 this year in the Gregorian calendar.

The Guanchao Shengdi Park in Yanguan, Haining, China is the best place to watch the tide.

The Sun Yat-sen Pavilion in the park. In 1916, after the demise of Yuan Shikai and his short-lived Empire of China (1915-1916) and the restoration of the Republic of China, Sun Yat-sen came to watch the tide. Hanging on this pavilion is Sun's writing "猛进如潮" ("To surge like the tide"), and on the wall of the pavilion's base also inscribes Sun's writing "世界潮流浩浩荡荡,顺之则昌逆之则亡" ("The worldwide tide (for democracy) is so vast and mighty that those who go with it will thrive and those against it will perish").

A panorama of tourists waiting for the tide, shot with my Android phone Xiaomi Mi Max 3 rotated on a tripod.

A Bell 429 helicopter commissioned by China Central Television (CCTV) to broadcast the tide live.

The tide is coming. S Mode, ISO 100, 1/500s.

A closer look. S Mode, 170mm, ISO 100, 1/500s.

An even closer look. S Mode, 3000mm, ISO 100, 1/500s.

The tide comes closer. S Mode, 3000mm, ISO 100, 1/500s.

The tide is going away.

A closer look. S Mode, 3000mm, ISO 100, 1/500s.

I was distracted by the helicopter and missed the opportunity to shoot the tide when it's right passing by.

Nikon Coolpix P1000
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