The culture of entitlement strikes again "Please fund my photography!"

Started 3 months ago | Discussions thread
Garthom Regular Member • Posts: 232
Re: The culture of entitlement strikes again "Please fund my photography!"
2

dgumshu wrote:

sportyaccordy wrote:

dgumshu wrote:

sportyaccordy wrote:

dgumshu wrote:

sportyaccordy wrote:

Nope, all wrong

Economy is bifuricated, opportunity is dwindling for much of the economy

Your blind narrative is the fuel behind the political turmoil. Denial of the economic systems prompted people to send a message to the establishment. They did it in the US and they just did it in the UK. Keep your head in the sand though. Repeating the same lie over and over eventually makes it the truth (not really)

All I can say is that if that’s what you think, and you can’t make it in today’s economy, you may as well be homeless because nothing will help you. That frame of mind is destructive. Things are not going to get better than they are today.

I'm making it just fine actually. Just because I've been able to succeed doesn't mean the system isn't broken.

And it will never be perfect for everyone... yet this economy is doing quite well in comparison to the rest of the world. No system is absolutely perfect and things could be a lot worse.

It's increasingly worse for a growing number of people, despite the overall economy improving. Obviously things could be worse, but they can, and more importantly should be better.

And a growing number of people is the problem and a related subject.

More people=less opportunity. All competing for Jobs, careers, Etc. Yes, “should or could be be” but that is subjective and relative. People tend to forget that little “competition” detail.

There is no endless supply of careers, jobs or limitless opportunity. More people equates to more problems, less opportunity and less prosperity overall. Not the other way around. It’s Not Impossible, but way more difficult with a growing population, and people don’t realize it. Yet, people continue to crank out those kids. So, you’d better enjoy opportunities available here today, as they won’t be here tomorrow. I do feel for those kids, though.

One of the most appreciated and valued classes (and lab work) I studied in college was “Man And The Environment” which dealt more with the extreme detrimental effects of overpopulation. A real eye opener. Surprisingly, most people haven’t got a clue and it is rarely discussed. However, the time will come... but it’s already too late to do anything about it. I won’t have to worry about it, but you might.

Also, there are millions upon millions of people that have crossed our southern border for a reason, as their lives “should be” better in the USA... at least better than where they came from. They would not understand you’re concerns about this current economy. Enjoy it while you can.

You seem to have an excess of opinions and a complete dearth of actual data. So let's go through this:

Population: The population growth rate is currently lower than it's been in several decades in the U.S. If there's anyone to blame for the large population, it certainly isn't millenials.

Laziness: The average weekly hours worked has consistently increased since 1970, so on average people work considerably more hours now than they did in the past.

Regarding your poorly-researched opinions on the economy in general, here's some actual data for you, straight from the WSJ (not exactly known as a bastion of millenial, liberal propaganda): https://www.wsj.com/articles/families-go-deep-in-debt-to-stay-in-the-middle-class-11564673734

Here's a quick summary if you don't want to read it: Expenses relative to income are several times higher now than they were in the past, and thus average people simply can't afford things they could have in the past (including college and home ownership, two things you've specifically mentioned).

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jnd
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