Do you use a UV filter as protection?

Started 7 months ago | Discussions thread
Adielle
Adielle Senior Member • Posts: 1,754
Re: Lens Elements vs. UV filters

JakeJY wrote:

Adielle wrote:

Tom Axford wrote:

Adielle wrote:

Tom Axford wrote:

Adielle wrote:

Let me know when you get a QuartzLine or Exus or a UV filter of similar quality to show that kind of horrible performance. Filters are not "all made equal", there's a huge quality spectrum, starting from extremely poor and ending in way beyond reasonable specs.

Now you are talking nonsense. The reflections from different filters will vary, but none are so low as to give no noticeable effects.

No, I haven't "talked nonsense", learn to read. Like I said, there's always a chance for noticeable negative effects and the point is that this chance greatly decreases with very high quality filters which have extremely low refraction and reflectivity. You just used a very low quality filter to demonstrate a point.

I did not use a "very low quality" filter. The filter used was a Hoya HMC UV(C) filter which is very comparable in quality to the great majority of filters used by photographers. Indeed, there are many cheap filters is use that give much worse ghosts.

Hardly "comparable" to good filters, that's a cheap 20 dollar filter that's known to be prone to flare and ghosting, there's nothing high quality about it. Yes, the majority of stuff is crap.

Lens Rentals actually did testing on the $20 Hoya HMC UV(C). It performs pretty much exactly the same as the $124 Zeiss T* UV Filter in all metrics (transmission, reflection, optical distortions). Out of 20 filters, there are 6 more expensive ones that perform better, but I think for $20 it's the best cost to performance ratio and you won't be doing much better.

https://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2017/06/the-comprehensive-ranking-of-the-major-uv-filters-on-the-market/

Then it performs very poorly indeed, because the T* UV filter is also known to be prone to flare and ghosting, and their spectrogram page shows that it will have some significant reflectivity, but the Zeiss filter is a special case where this can be forgiven because it's a filter with a very steep cutoff in the UV spectrum, unlike that of almost all UV filters which only give mild attenuation, so there are tradeoffs.

Post (hide subjects) Posted by
(unknown member)
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark MMy threads
Color scheme? Blue / Yellow