A few things I've found useful on E-M10ii

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David5833 Contributing Member • Posts: 974
A few things I've found useful on E-M10ii
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1. Like some others, I shoot mostly in M mode. I also mostly use AUTO-ISO on my E-M10ii. That way, we control both aperture and shutter speed using the front and rear dials and let the camera pick the ISO. This works pretty well for me most of the time and the display subtly lets you know if you are outside the AUTO-ISO range you pre-defined and need to adjust something. However, if I want to take it off AUTO-ISO and shoot fully manual at the ISO I choose, it is necessary to go to the SCP or into the menu. So, to make it more direct, you can reassign a button (for example, I use F2) to the option where the rear dial changes ISO. Now I can set SS and f with the dials as usual and then press F2 to have direct access to ISO on the rear dial (and to WB on the front dial, or vice-versa, but I don't often change WB). It is quick and easy, and as soon as you half-press the shutter release or press the F2 button again, the dials revert to SS and f, and the ISO stays at what you just changed it to. It's not a life-altering setting, but it is about as close as you can get to having a dedicated third dial for ISO as well as a dedicated fourth dial for WB. I use it more than I was using the F2 button for peaking.

2. If you want to bracket exposures on your E-M10ii but find the available EV steps under BRACKETING to be limited (max of +/- 1 EV per shot), look at the settings for HDR. There, you can set wider EV steps (e.g., +/- 2 or 3 EV per shot) for bracketing 3, 5, or in some cases, 7 exposures. Seems like these settings should be in the BRACKETING menu since they aren't merged in the camera into a single HDR image anyway, but it is what it is.

3. For macro with the Olympus 60mm, the built-in flash gives enough light to be quite useful but needs diffusion and a little redirection. Cut a lens-diameter sized, snug fitting hole in a moderately stiff 8.5 x 11" or similar piece of semi-translucent material, stick the front of the lens (or the hood) into the hole and let it flop or bend it forward so the built-in flash hits it obliquely and refracts (is that the right word?) it down onto the subject. This diffuses and redirects enough of the light just about directly on top of the subject at 1:1, works quite well, can be TTL, costs virtually nothing, no need to build an extender tube or box, has a relatively large surface area, and uses no additional batteries. You might have to reposition it if it swings around on the lens, but if it is snug it will stay in place reasonably well. I can simply live with it but If that bothers you, you can figure out a way to fix it in position so it doesn't swivel around. Or, you could simply buy one of these and bend it: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/621567-REG/Interfit_STR111_STR111_Strobies_On_Camera_Small.html

but the surface area may be a bit smaller and you still might have the swiveling problem, I don't know.

These aren't hard to figure out and probably have been described in the past so forgive me if you've already seen them, I just thought they were worthwhile as a relatively new E-M10ii user. Any other suggestions are welcome.

 David5833's gear list:David5833's gear list
Nikon D810 Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Nikon D7500 Nikon AF Micro-Nikkor 200mm f/4D ED-IF Sigma 15mm F2.8 EX DG Diagonal Fisheye +9 more
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
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