The little Sony arrived. Any tips setting it up?

Started 1 month ago | Discussions thread
Guy Parsons
Guy Parsons Forum Pro • Posts: 31,863
Video

vallhall wrote:

tbcass wrote:

vallhall wrote:

Will the RX100 VI be able to take HDR video, and will it work with my Sony ZD9 TV?

Thanks in advance

The camera is capable of sLog3 which extends dynamic range.

But i am able to play it on my TV with no fuzz?

Not sure about the fuzz, I guess that's optional.

Anyway, while away on holidays or at home I use a micro HDMI plug to standard HDMI socket adapter (it's a short thing about hand-span long) and connect the camera to an available HDMI cable that usually dangles off the back of every TV. Shows stills and 4K video quite nicely.

As for video settings there's more in that than in stills settings, it all depends on how you need to edit the video. Being a simpleton I leave the 4K settings at default out of the box and everything looks good, even extracted stills from the 4K video look darn good.

All the video possibilities are in the 584 page PDF manual or found in the online version of the same.

Hold on a second and I'll cut and paste what I'm working on, a personal revision of what is in Wim Arys' page (which is basically the manual anyway).

.................. menu item Picture Profile .........................

Picture Profile

Allows you to change the settings for the color, gradation, etc. When selecting this item we see the choices as below…

The default settings [PP1] through [PP10] for movies have been set in advance in the camera based on various shooting conditions.

MENU → (Camera Settings 1) → [Picture Profile] → desired setting.

PP1: Example setting using [Movie] gamma.

PP2: Example setting using [Still] gamma.

PP3: Example setting of natural color tone using the [ITU709] gamma.

PP4: Example setting of a color tone faithful to the ITU709 standard.

PP5: Example setting using [Cine1] gamma.

PP6: Example setting using [Cine2] gamma.

PP7: Example setting using [S-Log2] gamma.

PP8: Example setting using the [S-Log3] gamma and the [S-Gamut3.Cine] under [Color Mode].

PP9: Example setting using the [S-Log3] gamma and the [S-Gamut3] under [Color Mode].

PP10: Example setting for recording HDR movies using [HLG2] gamma.

The basic contrast and coloring are defined by the combination of [Gamma] (gamma curve) and [Color Mode] (color characteristics) settings.

Gamma:

Movie: Standard gamma curve for video.

Still: Standard gamma curve for still images.

Cine1: Softens the contrast in darker image areas and emphasizes gradation changes in lighter image areas, producing a subdued tone overall (equivalent to HG4609G33) Gamma curve that obtains a dynamic range of 460% when the exposure is adjusted to 33% video output with 18% reflectance gray. The maximum value of video output is 109%. Images shot with this gamma can be used without grading, but since the images have smooth gradation characteristics, this can be used to grade and finalize the viewed image in the post-production process.

Cine2: Similar results to [Cine1] but optimized for editing with up to 100% video signal (equivalent to HG4600G30)
Gamma curve that obtains a dynamic range of 460% when the exposure is adjusted to 30% video output with 18% reflectance gray. The maximum value of video output is 100%.

Cine3: Stronger contrast between dark and light image areas and greater emphasis on black gradation changes (compared to [Cine1] and [Cine2])

Cine4: Stronger contrast than [Cine3] in darker image areas.

ITU709 ITU709 gamma curve (low-light gain of 4.5).

ITU709: (800%) Gamma curve for checking scenes recorded using [S-Log2] or [S-Log3].

S-Log2 [S-Log2] gamma curve. This setting is selected when some grading work will be performed after recording. The exposure is set so that 18% reflectance gray video is output as 32%. Under these conditions, a dynamic range of 1,300% is obtained with 90% reflectance white. The maximum value of video output is 106%.

S-Log3: [S-Log3] gamma curve with characteristics closer to those of film. This setting is selected when some grading work will be performed after recording. It allows for better reproduction of gradations in shadows and the mid-tone range than S-Log2. The exposure is set so that 18% reflectance gray video is output as 41%. Under these conditions, a dynamic range of 1,300% is obtained with 90% reflectance white. As a characteristic of S-Log3, the dynamic range can be extended above 1,300%. However, Picture Profile is set to a dynamic range of 1,300% in order to maintain a balance with camera performance. Under these conditions, the maximum value of video output is 94%.

Color Mode:

Movie Color tones for [Movie] gamma curve (standard color reproduction for movies when Picture Profile is not used)

Still Color tones for [Still] gamma curve (standard color reproduction for still images when Picture Profile is not used)

Cinema Color tones for [Cine1] and [Cine2] gamma curve

Pro Color tones similar to standard Sony broadcast camera image quality (used in combination with [ITU709] gamma curve)

ITU709 Matrix ITU709 color tones (used in combination with [ITU709] gamma curve)

Black & White Sets the saturation to 0 for recording in black and white
S-Gamut Setting based on the assumption that some grading work will be performed after recording. Used when [Gamma] is set to [S-Log2].

S-Gamut3.Cine Setting based on the assumption that some grading work will be performed after recording. Used when [Gamma] is set to [S-Log3].

This setting is easier to use than [S-Gamut3], because it limits the color space to a more practical range than that of [S-Gamut3]. It is recommended in cases where [S-Gamut3], a wide color space, is not required.

S-Gammut3 Setting based on the assumption that some grading work will be performed after recording. Used when [Gamma] is set to [S-Log3].
This setting has a wider color space than that of [S-Gamut3.Cine]. It is suited for converting images to a format with a wide color space like BT.2020.
Depending on the type of camera, the entire [S-Gamut3] color space may not be supported.

Black Level:

This function adjusts the black level of the image -15 to +15. As an image effect, you can emphasize the color black to create an image that gives a powerful impression, or you can weaken black to give the image a soft impression.

Shifting Black Level in the minus direction emphasizes the black color in the image, while changing the level in the plus direction weakens the black color.

If you want to simulate an old film, or capture winter morning fog, the black level value should be increased. If you decrease the value, gradations in dark areas will be smoothed out, making the areas appear in crisp black. When using multiple fixed cameras to shoot the same subject from different angles, the balance between subject and background often varies. This balance variation may cause the black color in the subject to appear different when cameras are switched. However, this is an optical illusion. If it occurs, you can correct it by adjusting Black Level to make the black color look the same.

When using multiple fixed cameras to shoot the same subject from different angles, the balance between subject and background often varies.

This balance variation may cause the black color in the subject to appear different when cameras are switched. However, this is an optical illusion. If it occurs, you can correct it by adjusting Black Level to make the black color look the same.

Black Gamma:

This function lets you alter the shape of the selected gamma curve and adjust gradations in dark image areas. Range available between Wide, Middle or Narrow. Leven between -7 and +7.

[Range] controls the luminance range that Black Gamma influences. The [Narrow] setting keeps the range close to black, while the [Wide] setting extends the range to gray. [Range] should be set narrower when you want to control the quality of dark areas. If you want to adjust the overall image tone, [Range] should be set wider. At first, it may be a good idea to start from the [Narrow] setting.

Increasing the [Level] value brightens the image, whereas decreasing the value makes the image darker. For example, if you set [Range] to [Narrow] and decrease the [Level] value, you can create an image with dark areas that are similar to the ones seen in films. Unlike Black Level, Black Gamma Level adjusts luminance subtly.

Knee:

This function sets the knee point and slope for video signal compression to prevent over-exposure by limiting signals in high-intensity areas of the subject to the dynamic range of your camera.

First, select whether to set the knee point and slope automatically or manually in [Mode], and then adjust each setting.

Knee > Mode: Auto / Manual

Knee > Auto Set > Max Point: 90% to 100%

Knee > Auto Set > Sensitivity: High / Mid / Low

Knee > Manual Set > Point: 75% to 105%

Knee > Manual Set > Slope: –5 to +5

Mode: Auto: Automatically adjusts the knee based on what is selected in the following settings (when [Movie] or [ITU709] is selected in [Gamma]).

[Max Point] determines the maximum knee point level (white level). The knee slope is automatically adjusted according to the Max Point setting. The standard is to keep it at 100%. A lower setting will turn white grayish, while a higher setting will discard gradations in high luminance areas. [Sensitivity] changes the luminance level at which the knee’s automatic adjustment starts. When set to [High], the knee’s automatic adjustment starts at lower input signal levels than normal. When set to [Low], the knee’s automatic adjustment starts at higher input signal levels than normal. When a parameter other than [Movie] or [ITU709] is selected in [Gamma], the gamma curve will not exceed the White clip point and over-exposure rarely occurs. When [Mode] is set to [Auto] with these settings, the Knee function is disabled. If you want to enable the Knee function, set [Mode] to [Manual].

Manual: Sticks to settings based on the following selections.

[Point] sets the position of the knee point output level. [Slope] determines the inclination of the knee slope.
A negative slope setting results in a gentler knee slope angle. This expands the dynamic range, but reduces the ability to produce rich gradations. A positive slope setting makes the knee slope inclination steeper. This shrinks the dynamic range, but bolsters the ability to express gradations. When [Slope] is set to +5, the Knee function is disabled. Set [Point] and [Slope] in [Manual Set] in combination. If you select a higher setting for [Point] and a gentler setting for [Slope], you can obtain video-like sharp highlight effects. If softer film-like highlight effects are desired, select a lower setting for [Point] and a steeper setting for [Slope]. In practical terms, move [Point] and [Slope] up and down in opposite directions while checking the gradations in high luminance areas until you find the ideal settings.

Saturation

A positive value results in more vivid colors, while a negative value presents faded colors. Saturation must be adjusted in tandem with contrast. Bright and vivid settings produce video-like images, while dark and vivid settings result in film-like images. The combination of bright and light creates pastel tones, whereas dark and light settings create artistic finishes.

Color Phase

As you rotate the color wheel to the left (decreasing the set value) or to the right (increasing the set value), the colors shift along the spectrum from red to yellow, green, cyan, blue, magenta and red. Because this affects all colors, it is difficult to make specific adjustments exactly as intended. Use this function when matching coloring closely between different cameras.

Color Depth

This function adjusts the luminance for each color phase. The luminance changes more drastically when the selected color is richer (higher saturation). It does not change much at all when the color is achromatic.

A higher set value lowers luminance while deepening the color. A lower set value increases luminance, making the color look paler.
This setting does not only enhance the apparent vividness of colors, but also can express deep, dark colors.
Because each of the 6 colors — R (Red), G (Green), B (Blue), C (Cyan), M (Magenta), Y (Yellow) — can be adjusted individually, you can apply this function to just the colors you want to emphasize.

...........................................................

And there's more, it's all there in the official manual.

Plenty of adjusts to play with but for simple video clips (limited to about 5 minutes in 4K because of sensor overheating) then the out of the box settings look OK on my 4K TV.

Regards..... Guy

 Guy Parsons's gear list:Guy Parsons's gear list
Sony RX100 VI Olympus PEN E-PL1 Olympus PEN E-P3 Olympus PEN E-PL5 Olympus PEN E-P5 +4 more
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