Three weeks of learning photography - what would you do?

Started 8 months ago | Discussions thread
Badwater Senior Member • Posts: 2,095
Re: Three weeks of learning photography - what would you do?

j_eldritch wrote:

I've got some down time at the moment between jobs. I'm new to photography but I've been getting very into it recently, so I'm going to spend the time learning. I plan on treating it like a 9-5 day for the most part (though I've got a couple of other creative projects on the go too).

What would you recommend me, a complete beginner, to do for three weeks to progress my photography as much as possible?

I was thinking of doing an online course like this or getting and following an introductory book (this is about what my budget stretches to). However, I'd love to hear recommendations from some more experienced photographers. What do you wish you had done right at the start? Is there a course, book or exercise you'd recommend?

One thing that you must have to become a great photography is; INSPIRATION. Without it, you'll be just shooting randomly without any path or idea of what is great photography. Thus, your standards will be low. And your results will be of low value.

To get inspiration, find online resources that curate high end photography. Like 1x.com, or 500px, or any of the photo competition sites. And look at their top photos. Look at them on a regular basis of inspiration. Look at them and strive to unlock the secret of how they got the shot. Look at them and you'll see why they are of greater value than masses of random snapshots posted online every day.

Tune your eyes and think about what you see, and be inspired to emulate the best photos with your own creations. IF they can do it with a camera, know that you can too. Thus, by setting your goals high you'll always have something to achieve. And the inspiration will give you a direct path to get there. And, you'll separate yourself from the masses who spend more time photo dumping on sites vs looking at great photos.

To have this vision early in your photography will allow you to improve the value of your photography much faster than those who have low standards for photography. Also, know that nobody gets amazing photos every time they go out to shoot.  Each fail is and should be a valuable learning experience.  And there will be many fails.  Great photography with high value is rare.  And, the failure is part of learning to get to the higher levels of photography.  So never let failure dissuade you from photography.  Use it as an advantage and learn from it.

Once you know what great photography is, and have a goal to achieve, you'll be able to focus on the shooting technique and processing techniuqes used to get that amazing shot. Thus, you'll be able to learn faster.

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