What is the actual reason we see colors. Is it the geometrical structure of the surface

Started Jul 28, 2018 | Questions thread
OP MackMack Regular Member • Posts: 218
Re: What is the actual reason we see colors. Is it the geometrical structure of the surface

JimKasson wrote:

MackMack wrote:

Doug Haag wrote:

JimKasson wrote:

MackMack wrote:

I heard that many butterflies or flyings insect their body surface is made up of a certain structure causing particular light spectrum (color) to reflect and pass away rest of the spectrum color this cause them to reflect a particular color.

I am not from a science background but today this thought came into my mind and I am curious to know that same rule applies to everything in this world how we see colors.

example green leaf of a plant, blue sky, or a red car.

Each atom or particle at its very smallest part has a particular structure causing particular light spectrum (color) to reflect ?

Or I am entirely wrong and we see color for other reasons also example green leaf of a tree is green as other color of a sunlight is absorbed but not the green so we see green. didn't remember but I read this somewhere ?

There are two parts to your question, I believe.

  • How is the spectrum of a reflective surface created?
  • How do our eyes convert such spectra into colors?

Both of these are quite complex. I think you're mainly concerned about the first one. But before I start struggling with coming up with an explanation, I want to make sure that's the case.

Is it?

Reflective spectra are the wavelength-by-wavelength product of the illuminant and the reflectance of the object. Objects create reflective spectra in different ways. Here's how it's done in dyes:

http://stainsfile.info/StainsFile/dyes/dyecolor.htm

Here's something much less detailed for pigments:

http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=3711

You mentioned leaves. Here is a nice Khan segment that touches on that:

https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/photosynthesis-in-plants/the-light-dependent-reactions-of-photosynthesis/a/light-and-photosynthetic-pigments

Jim

It is good that you are getting a clarification of the question. In a recent posting in the Retouching forum, this OP revealed that he is writing a book on photography. I presume that may be why he has recently posted so many technical questions here and in other sections of these fora.

Thanks for remembering that I am writing a book and you are absolutely correct all my questions are because of my curiosity and for writing a book.

I am writing this book from the past 5 months and now with almost 200 pages, it is finished.

but regard few topics still I am working for example for reference purpose I have mentioned at very last in my book regarding best software for Photo editing (which I already concluded) but for Video editing still, I am testing one by one.

Thanks

Are you planning on answering my question from yesterday?

Jim

Thanks Jim for replying to me,

When I saw your profile I felt so honored that such a great person is replying to me.

Thanks, I never felt that I am worth for that "I am not joking, its real".

dpreview forum has really great people what I observe.

.

As I am not from Science and Physic background so :

the first link. when I read, I didn't understand at all.

http://stainsfile.info/StainsFile/dyes/dyecolor.htm

the second link regard pigments I understand around 60 to 70 %

http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=3711

and the last link regards why leaf colors are green I understood around 85%:

https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/photosynthesis-in-plants/the-light-dependent-reactions-of-photosynthesis/a/light-and-photosynthetic-pigments

final conclusion based on what every I understood is "few things happen with molecular when the light wave (photons) interact with them and as a result, we see different light for example In case of plants they reflect the green light wavelength and absorb the other color-specific wavelength light (which are consume to make photosynthesis)

But still thinking does that mean plants constantly 24 hours absorbing other light through - (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and β-carotene) and reflect rest of the wavelength which is green. How it is happening at night as at night also plants look green or at night also they absorb manmade torch-light and do the same thing ?

-=-=-=

I also understood that different molecular have a different level of energy that corresponds to the different wavelength of light so when molecular get this wavelength in the form of radiation when this energy is more it is passed to the electron of molecular by they get excited. But when these electrons are down (relax) to its original or "ground state" energy, energy is released in the form of visible light.

regard metal: I understood this :

"electrons in molecules are somewhat free to move and will absorb, then re-emit, the photon of the same energy. Metals are reflective because the electrons in metals are almost free, and have an infinitely large number of possible energy levels, and thus can reflect any photon.electrons in molecules are somewhat free to move and will absorb, then re-emit, the photon of the same energy. Metals are reflective because the electrons in metals are almost free, and have an infinitely large number of possible energy levels, and thus can reflect any photon."

Basically : because electron move freely so absorption doesn't happen at all and so they reflect every wavelength

or maybe I misunderstood again

-=-=

Finally, I am thinking to give up and not to try understand deeply on this topic as I realize it would be difficult to clearly understand for me as I am not from a science background rather I am from the Computer Science background but always curious towards Science and Physic and finally give up not to go further to understand.

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