Nikon D700 or D800 , Help

Started 10 months ago | Discussions thread
briantilley
briantilley Veteran Member • Posts: 3,103
Re: Nikon D700 - and an individuals point of view
2

Focus Shift Shooting wrote:

Leonard Shepherd wrote:

Focus Shift Shooting wrote:

But oh that wonderful pleasant viewing experience. Regardless of the lower megapixels, the higher noise, the lower dynamic range; the way the image looked the moment it fell onto the editing platform was already a delight, and the end result was like falling back into that moment you captured.

If you take the realistic point of view that, although the results had a nostalgic look, the colour was not anywhere as near as accurate as is possible now, colour like you maybe remember requires no more than a change of camera setting, shadows block up much more, dynamic rage is significantly lower than now and "high" ISO often becomes an issue by 400 ISO then, while it OK to look through rose coloured spectacles maybe you are looking through rose coloured spectacles

Hard to tell if you're trying to pick a fight after the horse was already shot dead.

Holding a different point of view is not "trying to pick a fight".

I already stated that I'm well aware of all of these things.

And I tried to explain that paper specs are not the whole story. EVERY camera model has a unique blend of its sensor and the electronics that interpret what the sensor "saw". Those two things are always different. Sometimes you can get very lucky and end up with a Nikon D60 or a D700 which has a wonderful aesthetic look to it. This is far beyond what the specs can talk about.

The point is that Specifications are just one way to compare cameras, but not necessarily the most important one. Charts and DXO and reviews are other ways, but again they are generally cold views of the camera, and are still not the most important ones. Then there is something much less quantifiable which is tied to emotions, a satisfying sensation of how the camera represents the light it captured. You can't gauge it, there aren't easy, flat, simple numbers with which to describe it; and yet it is by far the most important aspect of a great camera.

To some people, no doubt.  To me, by far the most important aspect of a camera is that it can be relied upon to get me the shot whatever the situation, in all weathers, lighting conditions and with many types of subject.  I'll never trade that ability for a certain "look" that I can easily reproduce in PP - but only if I got the shot in the first place

If you don't ever see that, then you are either too young in photography yet or your personality doesn't work that way.

I got my first SLR 45 years ago, so sadly I'm not "too young in photography"

Look, I get where you're coming from - we all have favourite cameras.  One of mine was a Minolta XE-1 back in the day, my first "pro-spec" camera.  And I loved the D700 when I owned it - my first FX DSLR.  And I stiil have a Df, and love it for different reasons.  But things change, and none of those would allow me to get the critical shot today as easily as my current D5, D500 and D810 do.  And these will be overtaken by something still more capable in the future, I am sure.

For those of us who look at art and are moved by it, these special cameras are tools that go beyond simple specs. They are like a favorite paint brush that we loved, but then was no longer made again. But for awhile, it was a joy to use such a brush that almost seemed to paint the canvas by itself while the hand held it. An elegant ease by which emotion was transferred from the artist to the paint, through the brush.

The best photographs are those which appeal the most to the eyes. And the dry specs of such pictures are the least important. It's like bottled lightning when you get it right. And I keep hoping for it with every camera that I buy. And they all have this quality of course, but in varying degrees. However, only a rare few really shine. I'll be happy when the next one comes around, and then after some years pass I'll look for the next one.

That's not nostalgia. No one looks forward to the future for the past.

 briantilley's gear list:briantilley's gear list
Nikon Df Nikon D500 Nikon D5 Nikon D850 Nikon AF DX Fisheye-Nikkor 10.5mm f/2.8G ED +22 more
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