An excellent AA battery P&S with full manual controls

Started Mar 10, 2017 | User reviews thread
Humansvillian
OP Humansvillian Senior Member • Posts: 1,715
Re: An excellent AA battery P&S with full manual controls

0lf wrote:

reyalp wrote:

0lf wrote:

First is proxy, second at full telephoto... which does not contradict what I said.

The point is that aperture on these low end cameras does provide useful control in some cases, contra your earlier:

aperture... when you start with a f/3.5-5.9 lens and a 1/2.3" sensor, I don't think it matter.

The point is that aperture give very limited control over DoF in a very limited set of situations on such camera. Even in your macro example wide open the DoF is already large enough for the whole flower to be in focus...

And also diffraction impact even at large aperture and noise in any situation except bright light compromise the little control given by the camera.

Thus, it is a very poor platform to learn how to use the diaphragm. I advice you to read on this forum the threads started by people upgrading to larger sensor asking why macro results are bad when shooting wide open...

That why A mode does not matter. Not because it has 0 impact (which I never said), but because it is very limited and compromized.

BTW there is nothing in focus on the moon shot.

After the beginner upgrades to a MFT or a DSLR he understands what a limited tool his beginning level point and shoot with manual controls was.

But these cameras were not made for the experienced photographer.

These replaced either a camera in a phone, or some older, less capable, fully automatic point and shoot digital.

I dug out my SX160IS and played with awhile. It's an amazing gadget for as little as they cost. The beginner can shoot it all day on Auto and he has a capable point and shoot with a 16X optical zoom with a stabilized lens. Just that feature alone beats his phone or his older compact digital.

But wait, there's more. This camera has a pop up flash. It won't go off unless you raise it.

And it has a DRIVE mode. Little sliders come up for the user to compose his photo. He can make it darker or lighter, neutral or vivid, and cool or warm, on sliders. That's neat. The beginner starts playing with this, and maybe he downloads and reads the manual.

Glory be, there's a SCENE setting with a low light mode, only four megapixels, and our beginner can shoot indoors in low light with his camera and the thing really works. He can take portraits, or shoot fireworks, beach shots, and more.

Then he's got a art filer setting. All kinds of neat things are hidden here, pinhole, B&W, Super Vivid, Poster, toy camera.

Then he gets a Gallery setting that shuts all the sound and flash and focus assist lights off his camera. Cool.

There's a Movie setting. He can shoot movies with a record button, but in the Movie setting he can play with his white balance, select quality options, and it's neat.

But the real attraction are the Program, Tv, Av, and M modes.

In Program, our beginner can set his exposure value, ISO, his white balance, his AF mode, chose metering modes, adjust his flash power, and shoot in single or continuous modes. He's got a real camera to learn on.

In Av, he gets to play with aperture. True, his maximum aperture is f3.5 , and his minimum only f8,  but he gets to play around and experiment with changing aperture.

In Tv he can set his shutter speed high enough to stop motion, or slow enough to create blur. This camera is capable of taking long exposures up to 15 seconds, or as quick as 1/3200 second.

Then, when he's ready, he can turn his cheap Canon camera into a fully manual camera.  In this setting, he can manually focus, manually set his aperture and shutter speed, and set his ISO.

By this time, if our beginner has made it this far, he's likely to run out and buy a Canon DSLR that is familiar to him.

That's the point of the fully manual controlled point and shoot,,,,it's a gateway to a photography addiction, if the user wants it to be.

Otherwise, he can take pictures of the moon or birds way up in trees or kids playing ball or Grandma and Grandpa, and he's not using a smartphone to do it,,,,he has a real camera with a real lens in a nice looking gadget.

But first we need to get the beginner into a real camera, one that is controllable.

There's time enough for bokeh, later on.:)

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