3D lenticular photo printing. Where?

Started Apr 5, 2012 | Discussions thread
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Newtral
Newtral New Member • Posts: 23
Re: Sad For 3D

There is nothing to be sad about, 3D lenticular printing (and holographic 3D printing) is doing quite fine for those who are interested. While its true that making 3D output is not a click and print process, it will always be an option and new technologies will continue to make it easier.

To clarify a couple of things mentioned in this thread:

1. You should always strive to take the MAXIMUM number of photos the process allows. In many cases this is 36 images, and is rarely less than 18. A large set of images taken over an appropriately large stereo base (the total amount of camera movement) gives deep 3D that has lots of "look around." This look around is one of the things that makes lenticular 3D so effective - more than just registering the appearance of depth. You cannot make really good 3D lenticular prints using the Fuji W3, you need more than 4 views. As for how many images exactly are required this is something best discussed with the person producing your output as there are several variables. Here is a description of the process and a guide for making an easy motorized camera slider - one of the easiest methods for making lenticular sequences.

2. Understand the limitations. Well made 3D lenticulars are pretty impressive, they can show several feet of depth in the best cases. But they are not holograms and you will always be aware that you are looking at something synthetic. It would be great to see a well made lenticular as a benchmark so you know what's possible. Don't judge a lenticulars capacity for 3D by a handheld postcard, the impressive 3D happens in the large pieces where the really thick lens can be used.

3. Try it yourself! You can get the lenticular plastic (lens) from a company in North Carolina called Microlens, they sell it in small quantities and you can get it with adhesive, which is easily one of the most difficult parts. Admittedly you will only be playing with the process unless you have a cold laminator, its impossible to get bubble-free full contact between the lens and print without one. But experimenting with the process is a lot of fun, and may very well prove how cool lenticular can be. You will also need a piece of software called an "interlacer" there is a free one called SuperFlip and several commercial products available.

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