One lens vs. multiple lenses

Started Jul 30, 2013 | Discussions thread
OP trut_maluglist Regular Member • Posts: 286
Re: "Contrasting Photography Styles"

MarkJH wrote:

trut_maluglist wrote:

MarkJH wrote:

trut_maluglist wrote:

I get the sense that most of the responses in here are from photographers whose photography is what they do. My photography is typically subservient to whatever activity I'm engaged in (e.g. sporting event, fishing, travel, hiking, family event). I don't plan things around my photography.

Hey, there it is!

Why are your friends using more than one lens? Because they're more interested in photography than you are. "I don't plan things around my photography" = you just aren't that into it, dude.

Voila!

(And, for the record: "I don't plan things around my photography" should also = "my criticisms and judgments of other photographers are pretty pointless, because I have no real expertise from which to draw reasonable or meaningful opinions.")

That was easy.

I can see you're more interested in winning arguments than in discussing contrasting photography styles.

You're giving zoom-to-frame point-and-shooting far too much credit by calling it a "photography style."

Actually, it's a lack of photography style. Or maybe a disregard of the meaningfulness of "photographic style." Or maybe even cynical contempt for all that goes into what a "photography style" really is.

It's not that it can't produce great shots now and then, but only in the way that a stopped clock ends up being right twice every day.

Hey, photography is a big tent. I mean, all the people who use smart phones to document and share moments are "photographers." But people snapping away at that new dent in their car's fender to document an insurance claim aren't using their camera as an artistic tool. Their mission isn't the artistic, aesthetic compulsion involved in sharing something engaging, striking, meaningful. They aren't trying to say anything enduringly meaningful to themselves or to the world.

So what distinguishes one side of the tent--the dude snapping smartphone pics of the dent for his insurance agent--from the other side--say, Richard Avedon photographing the cover of Vogue, or Joe McNally shooting a National Geographic feature, or Annie Liebovitz photographing the album cover of John Lennon's "Double Fantasy?"

Well, the Avedon-McNally-Liebovitz side is definitely "planning things around their photography." Draw your own conclusions, but it seems like you're standing next to the dude smartphone-snapping the dent while lobbing "quality" criticisms on others who might prefer to head to the other side. And I can't help but think that's why you're taking so much flack in here.

But you probably know best.

Please give me an example of photography in which one does not point the camera and shoot a photo?  It seems to me all photography is point the camera and shooting - whether it's advanced pro style photography or taking a photo of a car dent to document it.

What I sense is most pros and seasoned amateurs who do pro-style photography have a difficult time imagining themselves shooting photos like I do.  And that's OK.  Likewise, I have a difficult time imagining myself shooting photos in the manner they do.  Different strokes for different folks.  It doesn't make any of us wrong.  It just makes us different and means we have different priorities.  But my OP was meant to highlight those whose equipment choice isn't in sync with their priorities.

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