One lens vs. multiple lenses

Started Jul 30, 2013 | Discussions thread
OP trut_maluglist Regular Member • Posts: 286
Re: Self-imposed limitations due to fear and limited understanding

Bob Tullis wrote:

trut_maluglist wrote:

Bob Tullis wrote:

trut_maluglist wrote:

Daisy AU wrote:

trut_maluglist wrote:

Cailean Gallimore wrote:

Does your one lens allow you to shoot at f1.4, or even f1.8?

No.

Ah well, you'll just have to work around that then.

Lol.

I'd rather have the flexibility to go from 150 mm to 18 mm in 5 seconds than the f1.4 or f1.8 capabilities of a prime lens. A lot of it depends on what is important to the photographer. It's all about give and take.

Although I understand your preference for one zoom lens, there will be situations when you will need a faster lens. Remember, it's about capturing the light. Yes, you can use higher ISO, but the IQ of the image will deteriorate. I favour the convenience of zoom lenses too, but I also have fast primes.

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Thanks,
Daisy AU - Brisbane
( Nikon D7000 and V1 )
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ney_images/

I would rather have the flexibility to get that 18 mm wide angle shot or the 150 mm zoom shot at a higher ISO than be limited to a specific focal length of a prime lens.

Good for you. I'd suggest your perspective is limited due to a lack of experience, however. Fear of dust and missing a moment if you ask me is quite amateur. Don't question why those you feel less experienced are making such decisions, rather ask yourself why the more experienced might not find your revelation to be suitable for their objectives. Not understanding and making a judgement is the mark of narrow mindedness.

What works for you is fine. I won't tell you how to conduct yourself, but you have a lot of gall to make presumptions about other's objectives and practices.

Please understand I'm talking about amateurs who are not even close to as advanced as I am and whose standards aren't even as high as mine are.

Yes, that's been made crystal clear.

I guess I should ask if a DSLR newbie with a budget of $1000 to $1500 came to you and said he wanted advice on what setup he should get, what would you tell him? Let's say he indicated the most important things to him are traveling light and being able to catch the unexpected either near or far. Would you recommend he get multiple F2.8 lenses? Or would you recommend he get a 18-200 lens?

I'd offer my suggestions full-well knowing that the same suggestions given me early on aren't always followed. Some have to find the answers in their own way, in their own time. Actually, that's a common trait of our species. You're being told you are rather clueless here, but you'll only realize that when discovered in YOUR own way and time. The LAST type of lens I'd ever advise to get is a superzoom (a compromise between convenience and quality) - but if that's what one felt they really wanted, I wouldn't argue the matter. And I wouldn't care whether the advice was followed or not. They may well drop the pursuit abruptly at some point - or decide to take some classes that side step the confusion introduced by well-meaning self-appointed authorities.

These days, many people who wouldn't have owned a SLR camera in the days of film now own DSLRs. Many of them are beginners who don't even understand how things like aperture, shutter speed and ISO affect each other. Yet they go out and buy multiple lens kits to start out - and they shoot the same kind of photos I do.

And are they complaining about their experience the way you're complaining about their experience? So what that someone has more camera than they know what to do with it? I see DSLR owners all the time that don't look like they really know what they're doing, but they appear to be enjoying themselves. What is it my business to be concerned about whether they're using their kit properly or not?

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...Bob, NYC
http://www.bobtullis.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bobtullis/
"Well, sometimes the magic works. . . Sometimes, it doesn't." - Little Big Man
.

Thanks for the feedback.  Please understand this is not a complaint I'm making.  It's merely an observation.  After reading lots of feedback here, I can safely assume the newbies I'm talking about are likely getting their advice from pros like yourself.  Then when I'm out shooting photos with such newbie(s) and get a sense of their standards, I'm confused as to why they have such an elaborate and expensive setup.

I guess I should ask have you ever shot photos while you were "on the go"?  Perhaps you're traveling on foot around Paris for a day and wish to travel light.  You don't want to carry all your expensive gear with you.  What do you use?

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