APS-C IMAGE QUALITY VS fULL fRAME AT TESTING

Started Feb 24, 2013 | Discussions thread
MOD schmegg Veteran Member • Posts: 5,768
Re: APS-C IMAGE QUALITY VS fULL fRAME AT TESTING
1

Donald Duck wrote:

schmegg wrote:

You have a funny smarta$$ way (no offence) to twist this topic.

It's difficult to see how calling someone that would not cause even a glimmer of offence.

You are too sensitive. This is a commonly accepted "urban" term in the US with no good substitute. I believe it would not be even censored on daytime TV.

Yeah - I agree. Same over here TBH.

But, if the profanity filters don't agree, then neither do the site administrators. And, in that case, it's breaking the rules regardless.

When talking about comparative resolving power of different sensors, it's confusing to present the conclusion framed around data derived from an unequal comparison.

But we were not talking about resolving power of sensors. You were the one who turned it into such a discussion. Whether the 5D resolves or does not more than the 7D cannot be taken out of the context in which this question appeared in the first place. And that was - as a part of a system.

Fair enough - I did so because the term "resolution" was being used in a confusing manner. I personally think "sharpness" would be a better term for these situations - as it makes no particular claim regarding a single image parameter, but is rather more encompassing and befitting of image quality.

Sharpness (which is what the OP was enquiring about) is a factor of many things. Resolution is only one of them.

I know you already know this DD, but for the sake of clarity for any following, final image sharpness is affected by ...

  • The optical qualities of the lens.
  • The distance to the subject.

Both these affect the amount of detail available for the sensor to resolve to begin with. They are driven by the actual lens and sometimes by the size of the sensor (but not always).

  • Sensor resolution.
  • Pixel size.
  • AA filter.

These govern how small the detail can be and still be recorded by the sensor. The higher the resolution, the higher the resolving power and the smaller the size of detail can be. They also affect the acutance, or edge contrast, between pixels with respect to the detail recorded. This is the trickier one to understand, but Wikipedia has a short, concise explanation worth looking at if someone is interested.

Then, there are things such as subject and camera movement, the aperture setting, diffraction effects and some others (such as scene lighting) that all contribute too.

And that's before you start manually altering sharpness (by changing the acutance) in post!

As you may be able to tell from this, resolution is only one factor that contributes to image sharpness. And it's entirely possible (in fact it happens all the time) that you can have a camera that resolves more but does not deliver sharper final images in many situations. It's worth noting though, that in some situations, it almost always will - think macro photography and reach limited situations as examples of where higher resolution will be a big bonus, only eventually negated by noise when light levels drop (which is not a hard limit, but rather a product of the current technology used).

Sorry if I confused things - it was not my intention. As I said, I was attempting the opposite. Hopefully the little bit above makes it a bit clearer.

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