Anyone understands the point of Nikon's Auto ISO logic on D600?

Started Jan 22, 2013 | Discussions thread
olyflyer
olyflyer Forum Pro • Posts: 24,308
Re: Anyone understands the point of Nikon's Auto ISO logic on D600?

OutOfFocus student wrote:

olyflyer wrote:

OutOfFocus student wrote:

1. I agree (and know) that it will go below MIN ISO if the shutter speed has hit its ceiling. But that's essentially irrelevant for most shooting conditions.

No, it will NEVER go below Minimum ISO. There is only one minimum ISO and you can not set that. What you can set is ISO sensitivity level, which is the base ISO for Auto ISO. Minimum ISO is fixed to 100 in the camera.

What I refer to as MIN is what is used as minimum ISO (in analogy to MAX iso). I think you refer to it as base ISO (which certainly isn't a good name for it)

The minimum ISO for the sensor is ISO 100. The "base" ISO for Auto ISO is NOT the minimum ISO, it is called "ISO sensitivity level". By using the same word for both you are causing confusion. You are calling the "ISO sensitivity level" value Minimum ISO, and that is wrong. The camera will NEVER go below the "Minimum ISO" in Auto ISO, but will go below the user defined "ISO sensitivity level" value if necessary.

2. You need to set it to ISO 100 before you can turn it off. That's why two wheels are necessary and you want is lost setting is lost.

To turn what off? The Auto ISO? No, you don't need to set to ISO100 before you can turn Auto ISO off.

In A mode just turning autoISO off causes the most recent ISO to be used as MIN ISO. This is the non-sense since in most situations I want ISO 100 to be the minimum.

It is NOT the Minimum ISO, it is the "ISO sensitivity level" value defined by you, the user. The fact that switching off Auto ISO returns the camera to that level is NOT nonsense at all, at least not for me. I would hate it if it would automatically drop to ISO 100. If you want ISO 100 to be the "ISO sensitivity level" value then you can set it to that value to start with. There is no need to use anything else unless conditions demand it.

3. I still have not heard a single good reason to have ISO lower bounded (there are many good reasons to have it otherwise).

The reason to have a base minimum is to make sure you can keep a certain shutter speed and aperture combination. If you for example know that the camera will lower the shutter speed too much for your scenario and if you know that the light is variable there is all the reason one needs to set a higher than ISO100 as base ISO, but no, there is no reason to keep that and create a lot of overexposed images. Technically it is easier to save an underexposed than an overexposed image, so nor raising the maximum ISO but lowering the base ISO is a very good approach.

As explained controlling shutter via ISO is inconvenient and perverse.

So, everything you don't understand or not need "is inconvenient and perverse"... How old are you actually? None of my business of course, but you sound like 17.

That's why we have min shutter settings and S mode.

That's not the same, but never mind.

And anyone who finds this sensible please explain why in M and A modes it behaves differently?

The D800 Auto ISO behaves exactly the same way in A, M and S modes.

Well, I'm talking about D600.

I know that, but what's the difference between the two in this respect? Explain, please.

In A-priority: The aperture is kept constant and the ISO is variable between the "ISO sensitivity level" and Maximum ISO values as long as this will not result in overexposure. If there is a risk for that then the ISO will be lowered, but kept as near as possible to the "ISO sensitivity level" value defined by the user.

In S-priority: The shutter speed is kept constant and the ISO is variable between the "ISO sensitivity level" and Maximum ISO values as long as this will not result in overexposure. If there is a risk for that then the ISO will be lowered, but kept as near as possible to the "ISO sensitivity level" value defined by the user.

In M-mode: Both the shutter speed and the aperture are kept constant and the ISO is variable between the "ISO sensitivity level" and Maximum ISO values as long as this will not result in overexposure. If there is a risk for that then the ISO will be lowered, but kept as near as possible to the "ISO sensitivity level" value defined by the user.

Is the D600 different from this?

This is pure nonsense that (as far as I know) no other manufacturer has. The only good thing about this system is that AutoISO is flexible enough that I almost never need to use manual ISO so I use manual ISO only in M which is implemented in a logical way.

I am open for suggestions... how could the Auto ISO be improved according to you?

The natural way for AutoISO to behave is to always allow going to ISO 100.

There is no such thing as "natural way". It may be YOUR preferred way, but it is not a rule of nature. Anyway, how would that be an improvement according to you? If you want ISO 100 to be the minimum ISO all the time then set the "ISO sensitivity level" value to ISO 100 and your problem is solved. With your logic there is no need for anything else anyway, so why bother changing it at all from the default ISO 100?

This is how it's implemented on all other camera systems I've seen.

Well, that does not mean Nikon is wrong, is it? I mean, every Nikon DSLR I know has this kind of logic and I like it more than any other cameras I used and seen, so for me this is much better and is definitely the preferred way of handling Auto ISO.

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