Experiments with Nikon D600 exposure - seems too aggressive

Started Sep 21, 2012 | Discussions thread
Mako2011
Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 23,145
Red car

creaDVty wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

creaDVty wrote:

Not a method to meter every day family shots... but if the goal is to write an article about how the D600 meters, then an accurate and consistent method might provide better data.

I consider myself a practical guy, so I test it the way I use it. It may not be the way others use it and the way I use it might not be the best practice, so perhaps what I should have done is clarify that my test is specifically for the way I use it therefore ymmv.

I can see what you're saying. In that way then the camera did overexpose based on what you thought it was metering on. In actuality though, it did not overexpose based on the actual subject under the focus point regards matrix metering.

If I understand you correctly, what you're teaching me is that the location of the focus point will cause the camera to meter for the object in focus, and will meter that object as a midtone. My understanding of matrix metering had been that it meters the entire scene but is biased to "pay more attention to" the object being metered and make sure that object is correctly metered (not necessarily a midtone).

I word things wrong/poorly from time to time so take that into account. The spot meter looks at what is in it's field of view and the camera tries to make that tone neutral (zone five). Matrix meter looks at the whole scene and the camera tries to set an exposure that matches a program set of scenes based on what the matrix meter reports it looks like. In a Nikon camera....the matrix solution may be shifted by what is in the FOV of the focus array. That bias can cause a big shift if the scene is relatively neutral but the point under the focus point is far from neutral like a nice green field with the focus on a black car or a whit car. The shift would be next to none if the focus point is on a neutral object like a red car. That focus bias is simply something to note when it looks like it might have a bad affect on the exposure solution you the photographer are really after and may call for a little EC.

The reason the scene looks overexposed is not due to a tendency for the camera to meter hot but a technique the lends itself to overexposure in that specific situation.

Hm perhaps you're right. One thing though is that when I do the same technique with my S5, it does the opposite -- it often tends to underexpose. So the same technique is leading to opposite results with 2 cameras, which leads me to think it's not the technique but an inherent tendency of the camera (or perhaps, an apparent tendency of the camera based on the improper technique I'm using).

More like a difference in how metering information is applied in the two brands. Nothing really wrong with your technique....just nice to know how the focus point might affect the resulting exposure solution. The D600 might still tend towards hot with matrix meter (have to look at the RAW file to get a better ideal also as some bodies bias towards shooting Raw) but looking at the blog examples we can't tell for sure yet as the black car can throw off the results. Get a neutral red car

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