Are you willing to let film die off? How do you really feel?

Started Aug 14, 2012 | Discussions thread
Dave Lively Senior Member • Posts: 1,805
Re: Are digital copies easy?

Unless there are some dramatic improvements in Lasik surgery there is no way I am going to be relying completely on a phone or some other small screen device. Transferring all my digital images to a new computer is part of the purchase process and I do not see that changing. You make it sound like copying digital files from one medium to another is such a tedious task nobody can keep doing for long but it really is not that hard. I can see how not backing them up is something that is easy to let slide but transferring them to different devices is not. It happens every time you buy a new computer

In fact the biggest problem with relying on digital photos is it is too easy to create and safely store huge numbers of photos. If you die and leave a shoebox of photos your relatives will have an enjoyable few hours of reminiscing as they go through them. If you have a 10TB drive with 1,000,000+ images, no tags and/or no rating system you might as well have no photos. Nobody is ever going to go through them.

I try to pick out the most memorable 10-20 photos every year and put them in a special and easy to find directory but have been slipping recently. At some point I may even have prints made of these photos. These are usually shots with special people in them, not the shots of scenery or other subjects I spend so much time with. In 30 years all the artistic shots you value so much now are going to be much less important than pictures of people.

Digital is much, much better for preserving all your photos for your own use which is my biggest concern. But if you are worried about something for people to have at your funeral you cannot beat a small of prints.

RedFox88 wrote:

This has been my viewpoint with those that think digital photo files are perfect archival elements. We aren't going to maintain and monitor our photo files throughout our whole live, most of us won't. There'll come a time after kids move out, fewer and fewer photos are taken, and retirement happens. You may even put computers out of use for just a phone. What will happen to a box of hard drives when your kids find them in the attic after you pass away? This is 20 years after you put them in the box. Will the data be in tact? Will any computers of the day be able to interface with the drives? Will there be software that can open the files?

I see the pace of technology accelerating. I can see the optical disc (CD, DVD, Blue-ray DVD) being ended soon in favor of a different medium. If that happens, your optical discs may not be readable by anything in 20 years. Same goes for hard drives. Interface cables/ports advance and most likely will be all wireless here soon. In 20 years you might not have computers with any ports to plug anything in except for the power cord!

Where prints or slides in a box will still be prints and slides in 20 years that can be viewed within seconds of opening the box. Can't say the same about a box of hard drives and optical discs!

Post (hide subjects) Posted by
(unknown member)
(unknown member)
(unknown member)
(unknown member)
(unknown member)
(unknown member)
(unknown member)
(unknown member)
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark MMy threads
Color scheme? Blue / Yellow