According to Kodak airplane travel destroys your digital camera

Started Jul 2, 2011 | Discussions thread
theswede
theswede Veteran Member • Posts: 4,009
Re: Cosmic radiation does cause dead pixels

samWebster123 wrote:

Let's be clear, we are arguing the validity of the comment by Hummel that cosmic radiation causes dead pixels. I totally agree with this statement and have for many years known about this issue. I have presented numerous links to research and industry comments supporting this view.

You have provided no such links at all, still. Your links are incomplete powerpoints, research which shows no difference in sensor degradation no matter what is done to them airway wise and a paper on high sensitivity sensor degradation at stratospheric altitudes.

Not ONE SINGLE LINK about actual research supporting your point. Not ONE LINK.

A few more facts for the many DPR experts who claim this is an absurd, a total lie, a complete falsehood....

In the absence of evidence that airplane travel significantly affects sensor damage, the reasonable stance is to refrain from claiming it does. So, let's review your links.

Sony includes a reference to cosmic rays potentailly causing white flecks on sensors (dead pixels) in their product manuals. Case in point: pg 141 of the EX3 manual " http://ws.sel.sony.com/PIPWebServices/RetrievePublicAsset/StepID/SEL-asset-127526/original/PMW-EX3_OM.pdf "

Because if they don't, they'd get sued if it ever happened. Still NO EVIDENCE.

Jozsef Dudas, "Characterization and Avoidance of In-Field Defects in Solid-State Image Sensors", MASc. Thesis, School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University, 2008 Conclusion: Cosmic rays and radioactive emission from materials in the camera’s environment are the primary sources of radiation for imagers. There is an extensive discussion on cosmic rays in this paper.

This has never been in doubt. What has been, and remains, in doubt is that airplane travel increases this risk to a noticeable degree. Still NO EVIDENCE.

February 16, 2011 in volume 12 of “Sensors, Cameras, and Systems for Industrial, Scientific, and Consumer Applications” Based on 23 DSLRs, 4 point and shoot cameras, and 11 cell phone cameras. This study examines sensor size and iso range in relation to cosmic ray induced dead pixels. It concludes large sensors can reach higher ISO numbers so are more vulnerable than smaller sensors to cosmic ray neutron damage.

Nothing uncontroversial there. It stands to reason that a larger surface area means more absorbed radiation. What has been, and remains, in doubt is that airplane travel increases this risk to a noticeable degree. Still NO EVIDENCE.

A. J. P. Theuwissen, "Influence of terrestrial cosmic rays on the reliability of CCD imagesensors," International Electron Devices Meeting Technical Digest, pp. 811-814, Dec. 2005.

Once more well known data. What has been, and remains, in doubt is that airplane travel increases this risk to a noticeable degree. Still NO EVIDENCE.

J. F. Ziegler, "Terrestrial cosmic rays," IBM Journal of Research and Development, vol. 40(1), pp. 19-39, 1996.

A paper on soft errors. NO EVIDENCE.

Cosmic rays will not "destroy" your digital camera but they have the potential to cause dead pixels.

This has never been disputed. Ever. What has been, and remains, in doubt is that airplane travel increases this risk to a noticeable degree. Still NO EVIDENCE.

So please, some EVIDENCE for your rather absurd claims, please?

Jesper

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