Quick Survey on D7000 Oil Spots Did you have them: Yes or No

Started Jun 23, 2011 | Discussions thread
jonikon Veteran Member • Posts: 6,808
Re: Yes a lot

GMack wrote:

jonikon wrote:

I don't think you have to worry about any oil from the mirror assembly hitting the sensor. The only time the sensor is exposed to the mirror box is when the shutter is open. When the shutter is open the mirror should have already sprung out of the way and be in a parked position until the exposure is finished with the closing of the shutter. So the most obvious cause of oil spotting would be from the shutter assembly. Don't you agree?

Canon has already attributed some of the sensor spots from the mirror cage as 'over-lubrication' on their top-of-the line EOS-1D Mark III models. Here: http://canoncanada.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/12944 I don't know the physics behind the transfer itself, but it could also be getting flung onto the blades and then they transfer a much smaller amount to the sensor in their operation. Some in the Canon forum suspected rapid-fire shooting sequencing to be a factor too.

Interesting. I imagine the camera's temperature and the speed of air movement from the flipping mirror could also be a factor as well. Still, this is a documented problem with a Canon camera with a larger mirror and sensor, so unless Nikon says it is an issue, we are left to rumor and speculation as to whether or not there is a real issue with the D7K, or just a few isolated cases.

Back on topic, I don't think that what a lot of people are claiming as an oil spot in the D7000 is truly that. In the Canon demo photos, the oil spots they show are clear in the center with a darker halo. Some of it may be debris off whatever they use as shutter blades or some coating on them that gets rubbed and comes off and then clings to the sensor glass. I've noticed that the spots I get sometimes seem to move at times which might be due to the self-cleaning process the camera does, just that they love to cling to the sensor.

I tend to agree with you here.

Fwiw, I'm not keen on the blower bulb since I've worked in the repair field, but it's quick and dirty. If it's statically charged debris, it just get worse by blowing or gets buried in the body or the flock paper in the body along with other debris and then you end up with a sandbox full of stuff. I like the vacuum method and use my little home-made silicon hose vacuum cleaner attachment at times when I need to get out stuff visually under a magnifier and a soft brush to sweep it into the vacuum hose and it's gone forever. Sometimes a little house cleaning is in order, and maybe a little wet cleaning too.

I would like to see a picture of your vacuum sensor cleaning apparatus Mack, if you don't mind sharing that is. I currently use the blower, but you make a good case for your method.

Best regards,
Jon

 jonikon's gear list:jonikon's gear list
Nikon Coolpix A Nikon 1 V1 Nikon 1 V2 Fujifilm X-T10 Fujifilm X-T2 +11 more
Post (hide subjects) Posted by
MOD Mako2011
MOD Mako2011
MOD Mako2011
MOD Mako2011
MOD Mako2011
(unknown member)
MOD Mako2011
(unknown member)
MOD Mako2011
MOD Mako2011
MOD Mako2011
MOD Mako2011
Leo
MOD Mako2011
MOD Mako2011
Leo
MOD Mako2011
MOD Mako2011
MOD Mako2011
Leo
MOD Mako2011
Leo
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark MMy threads
Color scheme? Blue / Yellow