Landscape photography
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Landscape photography

Canon EOS M6 Mark II | Canon EF-M 22mm F2 | ISO 100 | 1/160 sec | F7.1
Photo by Richard Butler

Both cameras tick a fair amount of boxes for landscape shooting, albeit different ones. The more compact EOS M6 II is going to be the easier option to pack into a bag for heading out into the elements, though you may want to add on the optional EVF for shooting in bright light.

However, the Nikon Z50's claimed weather sealing is probably going to help it stand up to those elements better if you're expecting inclement weather, and its larger grip, buttons and dials will be more easily operable with gloves. You can top them up with USB should battery life run down while you're off the grid - and they have similar battery life numbers.

If you like to crop, or you want to make the largest prints you can from an APS-C sensor, the M6 II is your best bet

Based on our testing of cameras with similar sensors, we expect both the Z50 and M6 II to have good dynamic range, so that won't be a big differentiator. But resolution absolutely will be: 32.5MP is a good amount more than 20.9MP. So if you like to crop, or you want to make the largest prints you can from an APS-C sensor, the M6 II is your best bet here.

But we must also consider lenses: from our initial photos, we've only seen one native zoom lens that performs well on the high-res M6 II sensor, and that's the wide-angle 11-22mm F4.5-5.6. There's a wide suite of primes for the system now, to be sure (more on those later), but for users who work with a more 'standard' zoom range, we think Nikon's Z50 solution may be best.

Of course, you can always adapt lenses from Canon's EF-S and EF mount DSLRs onto the M6 II, and Nikon's Z-mount full-frame lenses and F-mount lenses on the Z50. If you're willing to put up with the extra bulk and cost, either camera will offer you plenty of options.