8K Technology
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8K Technology

We actually saw 8K display technology for the first time at NAB a couple years ago. And yes, it's good bleeping amazing. Last year, Canon had an 8K reference display in its booth with a magnifying glass next to it, teasing you to try to see the pixels. After all, with 8K you're collecting about the same number of pixels as a Nikon D810. In bursts of 24 or 30 frames. Every second. Think of the memory cards you're going to need... but I digress...

What does 8K mean for photographers, videographers, and emerging filmmakers? Right now, not a lot. In fact, it's unlikely we'll even see 8K TVs being widely marketed to consumers for a number of years. But on the content creation side, there's a lot to be said for 8K. With 4K quickly moving in the direction of becoming a standard for viewing content, 8K will give content creators the same advantages that 4K acquisition has for creating 1080p content. Right now we're still talking about very expensive, high end pro cinema and broadcast equipment, but what we see at NAB is often a preview to what we'll see in less expensive gear a few years down the road.

And 8K technology may come faster than we expect. We've seen 4K gain fairly wide adoption very quickly, and most of the industry seems hell-bent on a collision course between full 8K broadcast and the 2020 Tokyo Olympics (having already demonstrated it at London 2012 and run test broadcasts from Rio 2016). Some of this 8K goodness (or massive data storage overhead, if you're the glass-half-empty type) may start filtering its way into our cameras in the next few years.