Autofocus
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Autofocus

The X-T200 has essentially the same AF system as the X-T30, though how you operate them is a bit different. Their shared hybrid AF system has 425 phase-detect points that cover 100% of the frame and offer single-point, zone and wide/tracking AF area modes.

Both cameras offer face and eye detection, and Fujifilm says that the X-T200 has the company's latest algorithms. It's too early to draw conclusions about AF performance, but it seems competitive with the X-T30 at first glance.

When it comes to selecting subjects on which to focus, the X-T200 is more touchscreen-based, which isn't surprising given its target audience. The more experienced users that the X-T30 leans toward will spend more time with the joystick and may want to fine-tune settings more than a beginner.

The X-T30 can shoot bursts quite a bit faster than its less-expensive sibling: 20 fps vs 8 fps

For example, the X-T30 lets you choose how the camera functions when using continuous AF, either by selecting a preset option or tweaking the settings yourself. This is important when the default AF settings aren't the right fit for shooting things like sports.

Speaking of action photography, the X-T30 can shoot bursts quite a bit faster than its less-expensive sibling: 20 fps vs 8 fps. It also lets you access playback mode and the menus while the camera is writing to the card, unlike the X-T200.

One very frustrating thing about the AF system on both cameras is that you cannot set the focus point whenever the camera detects a face in the scene, though this could change with firmware sometime down the line (but don't count on it).