Apple QuickTake 100. Photo by Carl Berkeley

While Apple Inc. is known for being a pioneer in the world of computers and smartphones, it also produced some of the first consumer digital cameras. The QuickTake 100, released in 1994, was built by Kodak and priced at $750. It had a unique binocular-like design and captured images at a whopping 640 x 480. It wasn't designed for a day of shooting. In fact, the internal memory filled up after just eight shots. An RS-232C port was used to transfer photos (in QuickTake or PICT format) to your Mac.

Apple QuickTake 100. Photo by Carl Berkeley

The QuickTake 100 had a fixed 50mm equivalent F2 lens, an optical viewfinder and an LCD info display on which to adjust settings. As you can see, there was no way to review photos on the camera - you needed a computer for that.

The successor to the 100 – the QuickTake 150 – came about 15 months later. This model, priced at about $700, looked identical to its predecessor, but offered twice the storage and support for more image formats (even PCX, for those who remember it). It included a macro conversion lens and also supported Windows PCs. Not wanting to leave original QT 100 owners out in the cold, Apple released a firmware update that essentially converted it into a QT 150.

QuickTake 200. Photo by Jared C. Benedict.

Apple and Kodak parted ways after the QuickTake 150, with 1997's follow-up, the QuickTake 200, being built by Fujifilm. In fact, Fujifilm sold a nearly identical camera itself – the DS-7. The QuickTake 200 had a more traditional design and had a 48mm equivalent F2.2 lens. 

QuickTake 200. Photo by Jared C. Benedict.

By far the most important addition to the QT200 was a 1.8" LCD display. Finally, there was a way to preview and review your photos without having to get out a serial cable. For those seeking an optical viewfinder, Apple included one which you could clip onto the camera. Other new features on the QuickTake 200 were a mode dial, limited aperture and focus adjustment, and a SmartMedia card slot.

While they were some of the first consumer digital cameras, the QuickTake cameras didn't take off as the 'big names' got into the business. When Steve Jobs returned to Apple in 1997, the QuickTakes, along with the LaserWriter and ahead-of-its-time Newton PDA were unceremoniously killed off.