Conclusion
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Conclusion

Looking at these two cameras through the lens of specific photographic applications is an interesting exercise, with the importance of the simplicity and reliability of the a6400's AF system shining through (when assessing them in general terms we concluded there wasn't a lot to choose between them).

The a6400's updated AF system is genuinely phenomenal

We're still not big fans of the experience of shooting with the Sony: its two command dials are undermined by the need to stop and adjust your grip every time you want to use the lower one. Its menus are still difficult to navigate and its touchscreen is poorly utilized. That said, its updated AF system is genuinely phenomenal, removing, at a stroke, one of the things you previously would have had to mess around with. If your photography benefits from fast, precise focus (particularly for human subjects), the Sony is the stronger choice.

Both these cameras are significantly better than the already good cameras they replace, so there's no wrong choice here

We still really like the X-T30, though. It looks pretty, is engaging to use and produces attractive JPEGs and consistently better video than the Sony. It's not without its own usability flaws: the joystick and Q buttons are awkwardly placed and the pressable command dials are fiddly and easily knocked. Overall there are arguably too many control points for such a small camera, but it's a camera that can be set up to be really enjoyable to use.

Both these cameras are significantly better than the already good cameras they replace, so there's no wrong choice here. So which is more important to you: the experience of photography or the certainty of getting the shot?