Stories tagged with technology

Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9
UPDATED: Sony's curved sensors may allow for simpler lenses and better images

UPDATE: Sony has released an image taken with its curved sensor, and provided more details on what we might expect from its curved sensor technology. We've updated our previous story with this image and details. Read more

Sony's curved sensors may allow for simpler lenses and better images

The sensors inside digital cameras are - generally - flat. But curved sensors promise greater sensitivity, better image quality, and provide scope for simpler lenses. Recently, Sony showed off some examples of curved image sensors, including (tantalizingly) a full-frame chip. Device manager Kazuichiro Itonaga claims: "The team has made somewhere in the vicinity of 100 full-size sensors with their bending machine. We are ready." Read on to learn more about this exciting new tech, how it imitates the human eye, and how it may find its way into consumer products.

Sharp thinking: Nikon creates selectable strength low-pass filter

Nikon has patented a technology that can adjust a camera's low-pass (AA) filter based on the situation. By using an electronically controlled liquid crystal panel, the AA filter can either be turned on and off, or set to 'normal' or 'high' intensity. The first design would allow for a D800 that become a D800E at the push of a button. The second design would have a mild anti-aliasing effect for stills, and a stronger effect to reduce moiré in movies. More details on this exciting development after the link.

Researchers in Tokyo develop high-speed subject tracking system

Engineers at Tokyo University's Ishikawa Oku Laboratory have come up with new technology to track extremely fast motion. Their new system - which uses 'Saccade Mirrors' for pitch and tilt, a 'pupil shift system', and very fast image processing - is able to keep even the quickest subject in the center of the frame at all times. According to engineers, the initial application for this system could be to capture video at sporting events. They expect it to be market-ready in about two years. Follow the link for a video demonstration of this intriguing new technology.

Aptina's Clarity+ sensor tech promises 1EV improvement

Sensor maker Aptina has given more details of its Clarity+ technology that it claims will offer a 1EV improvement in sensitivity over conventional sensors. The company believes it has found a way to use clear pixels to capture more light while retaining the image quality of a standard Bayer sensor. Although initially intended for smartphone sized sensors, the company says it could have applications in larger formats. Find out more over at connect.dpreview.com

Bell Labs creates lensless single-pixel camera

Scientists at Bell Labs have built a prototype camera that uses no lens and a single-pixel sensor. This idea is based around a grid of small apertures that each direct light rays from different parts of the scene to the sensor, and can be opened and closed independently. The sensor makes a series of measurements with different combinations of open apertures, and uses this data to reconstruct the scene in front of the camera. No lens to focus the resultant image means infinite depth of field and low cost. Click through for more details and a link to the original research. 

Fujifilm harnesses silver for new touch-screen technology

Fujifilm is looking to bring down the cost of touch-screen technology by harnessing materials and manufacturing expertise used in creating film emulsions. Touch-screens are quickly becoming the standard interface of nearly every piece of mobile technology. Currently these screens utilize the fairly rare metal, indium. Due to its rarity, indium is responsible for a significant portion in the cost of current touch-screen displays. Fujifilm hopes to use its long history with silver to bring down the cost of these displays and grab a piece of the ever expanding touch-screen market.(via Bloomberg)

Rambus unveils 'Binary Pixel' sensor tech for expanded dynamic range

US technology company Rambus has unveiled 'Binary Pixel' sensor technology, promising greatly expanded dynamic range for the small sensors used in devices such as smartphones. Current image sensors are unable to record light above a specific saturation point, which results in clipped highlights. Binary Pixel technology gets around this by recording when a pixel has received a certain amount of light, then resetting it and in effect restarting the exposure. The result is significantly expanded dynamic range from a single exposure. 

Fujifilm patents hybrid organic/CMOS sensor

Fujifilm has been granted a patent for an innovative organic-hybrid sensor technology. However, while interesting, it may not offer a compelling advantage over existing designs, according to sensor technologist Professor Eric Fossum. The company has recently been granted a patent for its work on a sensor that uses an organic (carbon-chemistry-based) material on top of silicon circuitry. Speculation about Fujifilm's forthcoming mirrorless camera has latched onto a technical paper the company published in late 2009, but both Fossum and the company say the work shows more promise for small-scale sensors.

Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9