Stories tagged with technology

Total: 52, showing: 1 – 50
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Olympus patent points at sensors with built-in polarizing filter

Olympus has patented a technology that records polarization information on the sensor itself, giving the effect of a polarizing filter but without the light cost. The patent is for a two-layer sensor that records color and brightness information on the top layer, just like a conventional sensor, but then has a second layer that captures information about the polarization of the light arriving at the camera. Read more

Intel and Micron create 3D XPoint: a smaller, faster, more secure memory technology

Chip makers Micron and Intel have announced a new form of computer memory that promises faster, more reliable storage than current technologies, in a smaller space and at similar prices. The technology could reduce the distinction between memory and storage within computers and provide a faster, more stable way of storing large Raw and video files. Read more

Meet Ralph, the New Horizons probe imaging tool responsible for Pluto photos

Over the last week or so, images from the New Horizons mission have been arriving back at Earth as the probe begins the 16-month task of returning data from its July 14th Pluto flyby. Take a look at the imaging systems responsible for the impressive photos of the dwarf planet. Read more

Two new lenses and 'Post-Focus' technology on the way from Panasonic

Alongside two camera announcements, Panasonic has gone public with plans for a new post-focus feature for selected cameras and two new lenses. Enabled by 4K video capture and its DFD (Depth From Defocus) technology, Post Focus will allow users to select a focus point after capture. New lenses on the way include a Leica DG 100-400mm F4-6.3 zoom and Lumix G 25mm F1.7 prime. Read more

DxOMark: EOS 5DS/R sensor is highest-ranked Canon sensor yet

DxOMark published its report on the 50MP sensor in the Canon's EOS 5DS and 5DS R. They're the best-performing Canon sensors to date, offering massive resolution along along with small dynamic range improvements. Do the cameras raise the bar relative to competitors though? Our technical editor Rishi does a thorough analysis, using DxO's data to pit the 5DS against the Nikon D810. Click through for more

UrtheCast releases first full-color HD videos of Earth recorded from ISS

UrtheCast has published the first full color HD videos recorded of Earth from space via a new camera system mounted on the International Space Station. The videos are short recordings of regions in Barcelona, Boston, and London, and show the cities at a one-meter resolution. Read more

Opinion: The future of DSLR or: how I learned to stop worrying and love the ILC

Despite some sales growth, mirrorless isn't taking over photography. Equally, DSLRs aren't flying off the shelves the way they used to. But if you've found yourself arguing about whether mirrorless is the future, you've probably been addressing the wrong question. DPReview's Richard Butler argues that convergence is coming and that it's not the mirrors that matter. Read more

Panasonic 4K Photo reaches to grab stills-from-video dream

Using a video feed to capture stills isn't a new idea - Nikon's first electronic camera, the QV-1000C, did it in the late 1980s - but the resolution of 4K makes it more useful. Panasonic has recognized this way of working and has introduced 4K Photo mode to its 4K cameras, to make things easier for the user. We took the feature for a test drive. Read more

NCTech announces single-shot 360 camera for Google Street View applications

UK imaging systems firm NCTech is to introduce a four-sensor, single-shot camera that it says can create a 360 degree image of a street scene or an interior in less than two minutes. The iris360 uses four lens units in front of four 10MP sensors arranged at 90 degree intervals, and images can be uploaded directly to Google Street View. The lenses are triggered simultaneously and the resultant images are stitched together automatically in-camera. Read more

MIT algorithm aims to eradicate reflections from photos taken through windows

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology claim to have developed a method for eliminating reflections in glass via digital processing. It is hoped that with further development the idea could see its way into digital cameras, allowing reflections to be automatically removed when they interfere with the view through a window. Read more

Sources of noise part two: Electronic Noise

Following on our look at the effects of shot noise, our attentions turn to the electronic noise added by your camera. In this second part of the series, we look at read noise and how your sensor's behavior defines what your camera is capable of and consequently, how you should shoot with it. Read more

Lily Camera flies itself and follows its owner

Lily Robotics has unveiled Lily Camera, a self-flying drone designed to autonomously track and record its owner. Once it's thrown into the air it begins automatically following its target, which is anyone in possession of the accompanying GPS tracking device. Its camera captures 1080/60p HD video and 12MP stills, and the device itself is waterproof to 1 meter underwater. Read more

What's that noise? Part one: Shedding some light on the sources of noise

How would you react if you were told that the aperture and shutter speed you choose make more difference to image noise than the ISO setting? You might be surprised to discover that a lot of the noise in your images doesn't come from your camera at all: it comes from the light you're capturing. Our own Richard Butler explains. Read more

Sony Semiconductor site gives glimpse of next-generation sensors

A 20MP Four Thirds sensor, a high-speed APS-C sensor, and a Stacked CMOS design for enthusiast compacts are likely to be just three of the sensors we can expect to see in cameras over the coming months. Sony's semiconductor division has made these products public with the creation of a new website, which lists some of the chips it offers to potential buyers. Alongside many familiar-sounding sensors are examples we've yet to see in any cameras. Read more

Columbia University researchers create self-powered video camera

Columbia University researchers have created a self-powered video camera featuring a sensor that both captures images and powers the device. Although it can only record low-resolution 30x40 pixel images at 1fps, the photodiodes on the camera's sensor can switch between being photoconductive, and photovoltaic. In the latter mode - given enough light - the photodiodes supply enough power to a built-in supercapacitor to keep the camera operating indefinitely. Click through for more information

Flat elements developed by Harvard could make camera lenses smaller, lighter and better

A team at Harvard School of Engineering has developed a method for making flat lenses that could dramatically reduce the size and weight of camera lenses in the future. The method employs tiny silicon antennas positioned on flat glass components to redirect light when it reaches the surface of the lens instead of relying on refraction and the thickness of glass to bend light in a particular direction. Learn more

CP+ 2015: Canon shows off prototype 120MP CMOS sensor

We're at CP+ in Yokohama, Japan, where Canon is showing off a prototype ultra high-resolution 120MP CMOS sensor. Canon is claiming it has a pixel count equivalent to the number of photoreceptors in a human eye. Its surface area is halfway between APS-C and full-frame, and it appears to be mostly directed at video applications, capable of recording at approximately 60x the resolution of Full HD. Click through to have a look

3,200 megapixel LSST camera gets construction approval

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, more commonly referred to as the LSST, will take ultra-high-resolution images of the universe around us in the relatively near future thanks to recent construction approval from the US Department of Energy. This will pave the way for the telescope's completion for its anticipated 2022 completion date. Read more

BPG image format aims to replace JPEGs

There's no doubt that JPEG is the web's go-to image format, offering both widespread compatibility and small file sizes, but it's far from perfect. Alternative image formats have been developed that provide higher-quality compression, but nothing yet has come close to toppling JPEG thanks to its ubiquity. BPG is the latest new format to challenge it. Read more

Google develops 'coherent' image identification algorithm

Google is working on an image identification technology at its Research Labs in Mountain View, California. The latest complex algorithm from the search engine giant is able to systematically 'produce captions to accurately describe images the first time it sees them', creating coherent sentences rather than individual tags. Read more

Sony debuts 21MP stacked CMOS sensor for smartphones

Sony has unveiled a new stacked CMOS image sensor for use in smartphones. Called the IMX230, it features 21 effective megapixels, on-chip phase detection AF and 4K video recording. The chip is a 1/2.4-inch type with square pixels measuring 1.12um x 1.12um each. Video of up to 4K (4096 x 2160) resolution is available with HDR function (also available in stills mode). Read more

Lytro's new Develop Kit opens platform to NASA and more

Lytro has opened its doors to outside companies with a Lytro Development Kit (LDK), giving the likes of NASA and the Department of Defense - two of its first customers - access to its light field technology hardware and software. This is part of its Lytro Platform, and it starts at $20,000 USD. Read more

High pixel-density camera displays and wide-gamut Cinema 4K panel technology on the way

Reports from Japan's Display Innovation 2014 exhibition highlight a number of advancements and prototypes in camera LCDs. Included are a high-pixel-density 3.2" display using WhiteMagic technology, a high-resolution touch screen with in-cell touch sensors and a 31" cinema 4K wide-gamut display with 99.5% AdobeRGB coverage from LG. Learn more

Canon patents lens designs with variable and glass elements

It's not uncommon for a company to patent technologies that might be incorporated into products at some point, though the company might not have any plans to use it in the immediate future. Such a business move appears to be the case with a recent Canon patent, which details the use of variable lens elements in combination with traditional glass elements. Read more

Panono announces pricing and availability for rolling ball camera

German startup Panono has announced availability and pricing for its ball-shaped Panono Camera. The device shoots spherical panorama images and will cost $549/€549 when it ships worldwide in the spring of 2015. The first to receive the camera will be the backers of the crowd-funding project the company used to get started before the camera goes on general release. Learn more

Sony develops sensor capable of rendering color images at 0.005 lux

Sony has introduced a new CMOS sensor, calling it the highest sensitivity sensor of its kind. Developed for automotive use, the new chip can capture color images in light conditions down to 0.005 lux. The sensor is 1/3-inch type with 1.27 effective megapixels, and supports a Wide Dynamic Range system that uses extended exposure times rather than using multiple exposures. Read more

Tiny fps1000 high-speed camera boasts 18,500fps

Graham Rowan of Hertfordshire, UK has created a small camera dubbed the "fps1000", and as its name suggests, it is designed solely to record high-frame-rate videos. The goal is to open up high-speed shooting to a wider market by offering a relatively inexpensive product that is highly portable. Learn more

'Cities at Night' project puts citizens to work identifying images of Earth

Got a few minutes to spare? You've got enough time on your hands to help a group of researchers tackle a massive problem. Cities at Night is a project aiming to recruit help from ordinary citizens in classifying images of Earth at night taken by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. An effort of Universidad Complutense de Madrid staff and students, their main goal is to better understand and reduce light pollution. See how you can help

ESA's ATV-5 equipped with camera to document atmospheric breakup

The European Space Agency's ATV-5 supply vessel docked a couple of days ago with the International Space Station. Not just loaded with cargo for the ISS, the ATV-5 is also carrying newly developed camera technology which will record the final moments of ATV-5's breakup on re-entering Earth's atmosphere. The Break-Up Camera was designed in only nine months and will relay images from the last 20 seconds of the vessel's life to a capsule that can survive the extreme heat of reentry. Learn more

UPDATED: Sony's curved sensors may allow for simpler lenses and better images

UPDATE: Sony has released an image taken with its curved sensor, and provided more details on what we might expect from its curved sensor technology. We've updated our previous story with this image and details. Read more

What is equivalence and why should I care?

Equivalence, at its most simple, is a way of comparing different formats (sensor sizes) on a common basis. Sounds straightforward enough, but the concept is still somewhat controversial and not always clearly understood. We thought it was about time we explained - and demonstrated - what equivalence means and what it doesn't. Learn more

High ISO Compared: Sony A7S vs. A7R vs. Canon EOS 5D III

The A7S is Sony's newest entry in its full-frame mirrorless lineup. But where the 'R' in A7R stood for resolution, the 'S' in the 12MP A7S stands for sensitivity. We've recently received a Sony A7S and wasted no time putting it up against the A7R and Canon EOS 5D Mark III to see how it compares.

Sony's curved sensors may allow for simpler lenses and better images

The sensors inside digital cameras are - generally - flat. But curved sensors promise greater sensitivity, better image quality, and provide scope for simpler lenses. Recently, Sony showed off some examples of curved image sensors, including (tantalizingly) a full-frame chip. Device manager Kazuichiro Itonaga claims: "The team has made somewhere in the vicinity of 100 full-size sensors with their bending machine. We are ready." Read on to learn more about this exciting new tech, how it imitates the human eye, and how it may find its way into consumer products.

Sharp thinking: Nikon creates selectable strength low-pass filter

Nikon has patented a technology that can adjust a camera's low-pass (AA) filter based on the situation. By using an electronically controlled liquid crystal panel, the AA filter can either be turned on and off, or set to 'normal' or 'high' intensity. The first design would allow for a D800 that become a D800E at the push of a button. The second design would have a mild anti-aliasing effect for stills, and a stronger effect to reduce moiré in movies. More details on this exciting development after the link.

Faded dream: blogger looks back at the failure of the Silicon Film project

In the early days of digital photography a small American company, Imagek, started developing a digital sensor module that could be installed in film SLRs. The idea still generates excitement today, more than ten years after the company (by then named Silicon Film) failed. Photographer and blogger Olivier Duong has taken a look back at the promise and disappointment of the Silicon Film dream.

Researchers in Tokyo develop high-speed subject tracking system

Engineers at Tokyo University's Ishikawa Oku Laboratory have come up with new technology to track extremely fast motion. Their new system - which uses 'Saccade Mirrors' for pitch and tilt, a 'pupil shift system', and very fast image processing - is able to keep even the quickest subject in the center of the frame at all times. According to engineers, the initial application for this system could be to capture video at sporting events. They expect it to be market-ready in about two years. Follow the link for a video demonstration of this intriguing new technology.

Aptina's Clarity+ sensor tech promises 1EV improvement

Sensor maker Aptina has given more details of its Clarity+ technology that it claims will offer a 1EV improvement in sensitivity over conventional sensors. The company believes it has found a way to use clear pixels to capture more light while retaining the image quality of a standard Bayer sensor. Although initially intended for smartphone sized sensors, the company says it could have applications in larger formats. Find out more over at connect.dpreview.com

Bell Labs creates lensless single-pixel camera

Scientists at Bell Labs have built a prototype camera that uses no lens and a single-pixel sensor. This idea is based around a grid of small apertures that each direct light rays from different parts of the scene to the sensor, and can be opened and closed independently. The sensor makes a series of measurements with different combinations of open apertures, and uses this data to reconstruct the scene in front of the camera. No lens to focus the resultant image means infinite depth of field and low cost. Click through for more details and a link to the original research. 

Fujifilm harnesses silver for new touch-screen technology

Fujifilm is looking to bring down the cost of touch-screen technology by harnessing materials and manufacturing expertise used in creating film emulsions. Touch-screens are quickly becoming the standard interface of nearly every piece of mobile technology. Currently these screens utilize the fairly rare metal, indium. Due to its rarity, indium is responsible for a significant portion in the cost of current touch-screen displays. Fujifilm hopes to use its long history with silver to bring down the cost of these displays and grab a piece of the ever expanding touch-screen market.(via Bloomberg)

Rambus unveils 'Binary Pixel' sensor tech for expanded dynamic range

US technology company Rambus has unveiled 'Binary Pixel' sensor technology, promising greatly expanded dynamic range for the small sensors used in devices such as smartphones. Current image sensors are unable to record light above a specific saturation point, which results in clipped highlights. Binary Pixel technology gets around this by recording when a pixel has received a certain amount of light, then resetting it and in effect restarting the exposure. The result is significantly expanded dynamic range from a single exposure. 

Adobe's Fujifilm X-Trans sensor processing tested

The Adobe Camera Raw 7.4 and Lightroom 4.4 release candidates include a much-anticipated re-working of raw support for Fujifilm X-Trans sensor cameras the X-Pro1, X-E1, X100S, and X20. Find out if these changes offer the quality improvements users have been waiting for.

Fujifilm X100S Digital Split Image focus - how it works

The Fujifilm X100S is the latest in a recent rush of cameras to include phase-detection elements on its imaging sensor, giving an AF system that is a hybrid of contrast and phase-detection methods. However, Fujifilm also uses this system to provide a unique and incredibly clever manual focus aid - which could finally allow digital cameras to offer the speed and convenience enjoyed by manual-focus SLR and rangefinder users. Fujifilm UK has posted a video showing 'Digital Split Image' focusing and Japanese camera site DCWatch has published details that allow us to show how it works.

Fujifilm X10 'Orbs' Investigated. Does the Firmware Fix Work?

Not long after samples of the Fujifilm X10 became available reports started surfacing of 'white orbs' appearing in images. Fujifilm subsequently released a firmware update that promises to address the issue. So does firmware version 1.03 banish the dreaded 'white orbs' for good?

An introduction to OLED
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OLED screens are becoming increasingly common on enthusiast cameras. So, what’s all the fuss, and why should you care about the technology behind your camera’s screen? We look at the benefits, challenges and possibilities of OLED for photography.

Fujifilm patents hybrid organic/CMOS sensor

Fujifilm has been granted a patent for an innovative organic-hybrid sensor technology. However, while interesting, it may not offer a compelling advantage over existing designs, according to sensor technologist Professor Eric Fossum. The company has recently been granted a patent for its work on a sensor that uses an organic (carbon-chemistry-based) material on top of silicon circuitry. Speculation about Fujifilm's forthcoming mirrorless camera has latched onto a technical paper the company published in late 2009, but both Fossum and the company say the work shows more promise for small-scale sensors.

Lytro Light Field Camera first look with Ren Ng

Lytro founder and CEO Dr. Ren Ng talks us through the company's Light Field Camera

A distorted view? In-camera distortion correction

Richard Butler looks at the trend towards cameras correcting lens distortion and what it means for photographers.

Sense and Sensitivity
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Sensitivity (ISO) in digital imaging is the subject of quite a lot of confusion - it's becoming common to hear talk of manufacturers 'cheating with ISO.' Here we look at why sensitivity can be hard to pin down, why we use the definition we do and how it's really as complicated as it can seem.

Behind the scenes: extended highlights!

Sensors, sensitivity, exposure and dynamic range (blog post)

Exclusive: Fujifilm's phase detection system explained

With the announcement of the Fujifilm F300 EXR and Z800 EXR coming on a day that also saw four other cameras being launched, it would be easy to overlook their most radical feature. Because, with the latest version of its EXR sensor, Fujifilm has achieved something that's been hoped for but not previously brought to market - through-the-lens phase detection autofocus on a compact camera. The company is claiming the system enables focus times as fast as 0.158 sec. We got some more details of the system from Hitoshi Yamashita, manager of the company's Technical Support Group.

Total: 52, showing: 1 – 50
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